Member Review

Princess Margaret

by
Pub Date

Review by

Marialyce W, Reviewer

Last updated on 30 Nov 2017

I Recommend This Book

Maybe

If you have always wanted to be a princess and live in a palace, perhaps reading this biography might change your mind. 

Princess Margaret was the younger daughter of King George VI, whom she adored, and Queen Elizabeth (the current Queens's mother) She was sister to Elizabeth II, the longest reigning monarch in England's history, and one supposes both of these girls led a life of charm, wealth, prestige, and honor. Elizabeth went on to becoming queen at her father's death while Margaret went on to becoming a much maligned jet setter who earned a reputation for being quite controversial in all she did and especially in her choices of men. Forced to give up a man she loved, Peter Townsend, because he was divorced, she eventually married photographer, Antony Armstrong-Jones, had two children and embarked on a road to a very shaky marriage. Later, they divorced and Margaret's name was linked to many other men.

Margaret was brash, outspoken, and very often the brunt of newspaper headlines that portrayed her as wanton, snobbish, and impulsive. Margaret once said  "It was inevitable, when there are two sisters and one is the Queen, who must be the source of honour and all that is good, while the other must be the focus of the most creative malice, the evil sister."

It was often sad to read of Margaret's life. She always seemed to be in the spotlight and many of her remarks and activities were taken out of context. In a way, one might say that Margaret was born before her time. She was a strong advocate of the arts, especially ballet, loved couture clothes, and represented her nation in countless ways. 

In reality for Princess Margaret being royal, living in a palace, being a Princess was often a nightmare. She handled this role as well as she could with the undeniable ability to be her own person with not a care as to who liked it or not. In the end Margaret paved the way for divorce in the royal family and some think that was her legacy. 

Thank you to Theo Aronson, Thistle Publishing, and NetGalley for providing a copy of this book.