Meet Cute

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 02 Jan 2018

Member Reviews

I don't read much of a book with multiple stories but I could say this one is worth reading for! I love every short stories and they're inspirational.
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A lot of anthologies are a hit or miss for me, and that was still the case for this one. I think the concept just didn't work for me. As soon as every story got interesting, they ended. I wanted to see what happened next every time and was just left disappointed.
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Honestly, one of the cutest books I've read in a while. 

However, I wasn't a fan of every story. I enjoyed a lot the f/f stories, and a few of them here and there. There were  some however, that were harmful and hurtful. I also can't believe there weren't any m/m stories? There are certainly a lot of YA authors that could have contributed. 

Overall, the stories that I enjoyed were super super cute, but the ones that I disliked were... a big disappointment.
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Meet Cute has a few stand-out stories, and I'm glad I didn't miss out on those (Zoboi, Lord, Murphy), but the bulk of the anthology is not great, at least if you came here looking for cute romances. A few of the stories I would have liked more had the collection been themed differently, but the title and description led me to expect certain things that I largely didn't receive.

"Siege Etiquette" by Katie Cotugno
This, right here, is why I find anthologies so incredibly frustrating. An anthology called Meet Cute with the subtitle "Some People Are Destined to Meet" should be full of adorable romances with meet cutes. That's what I was promised. Instead, it opens with this story about a queen bee who called the cops on the part she's attending and hides in the bathroom with Wolf, a boy who lives on a farm and is thus not cool. They do not bond but they make out some, and it's the least cute thing ever. To top it all off, it's in SECOND PERSON. ½

"Print Shop" by Nina LaCour
LaCour's offering is actually a cute start to a romance, which is good. A girl with a new job running a Twitter account for a print shop discovers that the disgruntled customer flaming them on Twitter is a cute girl in high school. There's not enough to really explain the bond between them and it ends before anything happens, but the writing is good. Minus the first and last sections which refer to Lauren as "you" though the rest does not, which I loathe. ★★★

"Hourglass" by Ibi Zoboi
Finally a story I firmly like! "Hourglass" is about a 6'5" black girl in a small white town right at the end of the year. There are tensions with her best friend, her family, and her college plans. (Aside: always apply to a safety school if you possibly can.) The writing and voice are amazing, and I think this would have been an easy five star if there'd been more of it. However, the story ends immediately after the meet cute with no resolution to anything. I was stunned when I turned the page only to get the next story. :'( ★★★★

"Click" by Katharine McGee
"Click" is the first story that fits my expectations of what the stories in meet cute would be like: a meet cute to start off a potential ship and a little bit after that. The story is sci-fi, set in a future US with a massively accurate dating app called Click, which mines all our data on the internet to identify compatible matches. However, the story also attempts a grief component which feels like too much for a short story, and none of the emotions really had time to build. ★★★


"The Intern" by Sara Shepard
I've never read Sara Shepard before, always having assumed her books would not be for me, but this story makes me think her fiction might be worth a try. "The Intern" is a celebrity romance between the daughter of the owner of the record label and a cute musician. Once again, it's a story about overcoming grief. I didn't really get shippy feels, and once again it leaves off a bit earlier than I'd like. ★★★

"Somewhere That's Green" by Meredith Russo
A transgender girl in the midst of a battle to use the girl's bathrooms at school discovers that there's more to the story of the girl who spoke out against her at the Little Shop of Horrors cast party. Much as I want to love this, I did feel like it was more about the message than the actual characters. It's a great message, but in such a short format it does feel a bit forced and clunky. I'm also not sure whether I think saying transphobic things about a classmate really constitutes a meet cute either. ★★★

"The Way We Love Here" by Dhonielle Clayton
A bit strange. In a magical realism/fantasy world where people know when they'll find their love because of marks on their fingers, a girl saves a boy from drowning. They then proceed to view possible futures in a Sliding Doors fashion. And I think if you fall in love you can leave this magical island? Or something? TBH, I was confused by this. It wasn't bad but also what? ★★½

"Oomph" by Emery Lord
I am so grateful that Emery Lord, aka one of my fave authors, brings to the table the first story that really completely embodied what I wanted. Well, okay, almost, since there wasn't kissing. But! Two girls have a meet cute in the security line at the airport and proceed to banter adorably. The whole thing was precious, and it had just enough back story to round things out but not so much that the story felt incomplete when it ended. ★★★★½

"The Dictionary of You and Me" by Jennifer L. Armentrout
Fluffy and cute, Armentrout's contribution is about a girl who works part time at the local library and her months of phone calls to a delinquent patron. They began as an attempt to get him to return an overdue dictionary but turned into flirting with unusual words. Slightly unbelievable (he's the only one who answers the home phone ever?) but exactly in the spirit I expected; I feel vindicated, since she's the editor of the anthology. ★★★½

"The Unlikely Likelihood of Falling in Love" by Jocelyn Davies
Davies is a new-to-me author, and I was surprised by how good this was (but probably I shouldn't hold people's paranormal novels from the early aughts against them). The narration's a bit distancing, as it's written (loosely) like a "report" for the heroine's statistics class. She does a project about the odds of seeing the boy she fell in love with at first sight again on the subway. I really liked it, though I have major suspension of disbelief issues about the enthusiasm her teacher and all-male class have for this project. ★★★½

"259 Million Miles" by Kass Morgan
As expected from Morgan (and the title), this story is science fiction, about teens competing for seats on a one-way mission to Mars. As part of the testing, the male MC and a girl are put into an isolation chamber for 24 hours where they flirt and dance and have a heart-to-heart. More about the MC's character arc than the romance. ★★★

"Something Real" by Julie Murphy
OMG, Julie Murphy, you queen. "Something Real" delivers a classic meet cute (reality TV dating show!), humor, characterization, and an adorable ending. Even better, it's all with a major dose of fighting against the media attempts to pit women against one another; I love when stories can deliver a great message without it being ALL message. This is a perfect example of how to short story. ★★★★★

"Say Everything" by Huntley Fitzpatrick
What a disappointment! I loved Fitzpatrick's first two books, and I was excited to see there would be something new from her in this anthology. The story itself does sort of fit the premise. It's certainly more focused on romance than some, but there's a lot of back story to this (his dad apparently ruined her family?) and the date is creepy af (he takes her to her old home ALONE—everything in me thought murder was coming). And, once again, the anthology special: SECOND PERSON. CURSES! ★★

"The Department of Dead Love" by Nicola Yoon
Iiiiinteresting. Speculative fiction set in a future where departments are set up to help with difficulties in love. The MC has gone to the Relationship Autopsy department to find out why his good relationship suddenly ended. I want to know so much more about the world, but it's an intriguing and unique idea. ★★★★

If you're a person who can skip around, I'd recommend checking out a few of the stories for sure, but if you have a compulsive need to read in entirety, maybe skip this anthology.
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Meet Cute is a collection of short stories featuring couples as they meet for the first time. Each story is vastly different, from a girl who meets her distant crush only to find out he's the son of the man who destroyed her family, to the girl whose challenging client at her new job turns out to be another teen with her same interests and passions. The stories span genres and styles, including a science fiction story about two teens interviewing for a spot to travel to Mars, and one featuring a futuristic dating app with a nearly perfect success rate. The stories also feature a variety of couples, including same sex couples and a couple that includes a transgender teen, as well as a wide variety of people from different races, backgrounds, and religions.

There are occasional references to teenage drinking, but overall, the volume is relatively tame and could be appropriate down to the middle school level. Romance fans will go crazy for this set of tales, with the only possible complaint being that each story fades to black just as the characters are coming together.  It's the meet cute moments that the volume focuses on, after all.  But all of the slow-burning build-up to the romance is here, the primary topic of each story. This collection might have some potential in a family and consumer science class, like Contemporary Relationships, but is most likely to appeal as a choice novel for students. The short story format may make this volume appealing to busy or reluctant readers, who will appreciate the ability to jump in and out of the stories quickly, or skip over a story that is less appealing. This is a much more representative and modern collection of romantic short stories than one published even five or ten years ago. Your students deserve an upgrade.
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I wish I was more sucked into these stories. For some reason short stories are always hard for me to get into. I really wanted something cute and fluffy and this just didn’t deliver.
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This was my first ever anthology that I have read. It was super cute and I loved all the stories by the different authors. Some of my favorites were Oomph by Emery Lord (5 stars), The Unlikely Likelihood of Falling in Love by Jocelyn Davies (4 stars) and Click by Katherine McGee (4.5 stars). 
All the other stories were super good but these are the ones that stand out to me!
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I would love to commend Print Shop, it is the only tory that captivated me from start to finish and I wish I could read more, the other stories didn't really stay with me and it took me a long while to get into finishing the book, but I'm glad I finally have.
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As with any collection of short stories, there were ones I liked more than the others. As a librarian, my favorite had to be Jennifer Armentrout's story. I also enjoyed the ones by Huntley Fitzpatrick and Sara Shepard. I am likely to pick up another collection that include these authors. I liked the artowrk on the cover, but noticed there is a picture of two boys, but there was not a story about them in the book.
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Meet cute is exactly what the name says - CUTE! This collection of short stories written by famous writers is absolutely adorable and it makes you giggle and smile like crazy.
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It was...cute! I liked some more than others. There was only a few told from male main character pov. Many were LGBTQ. Since it was only about who each pair met, I guess I was left wanting more from most of the stories, but of course, that is the whole theme of the collection.
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Buddy read with Holly, one story a day.

Siege Etiquette - 3/5 I wasn't a fan of the narrative style but it grew on me.
Print Shop - 5/5 F/F That was A D O R A B L E, I'll definitely read more by this author.
Hourglass - 4/5 I know it's a meet cute but I wanted MORE
Click -
The Intern -
Somewhere That's Green -
The Way We Love Here -
Oomph -
The Dictionary of You and Me -
The Unlikelihood of Falling In Love -
259 Million Miles -
Something real -
Say Everything -
The Department of Dead Love -
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Some of the best authors in YA :)
My students love to read everything by a favorite author, so this is an great book for my classroom
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I personally did not really like this book. I tried to read it at least six different times and could not do it. The writing style of the few stories I read felt kind of amateurish, and I felt as though I was trying to push through it rather than truly enjoying myself while reading.
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There's something for everyone in this short story collection about first meetings. My faves: Print Shop (one of my fave short stories ever!); Click; The Way We Love Here; and The Department of Dead Love.  Like all short story collections, readers' mileage may vary on which of these stories will work for them, but this diverse grouping will have something to please anyone who loves a love story.
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This is one of the cutest books I've read! Each "Meet Cute" story was interesting in it's own way. Most of them left me wanting more, wondering where their relationship was going. While not every story is one of my favorites, most of them make up for that with diversity which is rare in most books I've read.
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Sometimes I just need to get sucked into a feel-good story and stay there until I'm finished. Thankfully, I accomplished just that with this anthology full of short bursts of sweetness with meet-cutes, butterflies, first impressions, and so much more.

Meet Cute is a collection of contemporary stories about cute first encouters turned into romance. Not all people enjoy insta-love but once in a while, you'll want it if you're looking for something fluffy. The stories were hit or miss to me but my favorites were written by Katharine McGee and Sara Shepard.
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This is such an excellent, charming, and enthralling anthology! I thought that most of the stories were very, very good. Of course, not all of them connected with me but I enjoyed it as a whole. It's a diverse collection of feel-good romances that most lovers of YA fiction and contemporaries will like, too! I recommend this one.
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Insta-love and I don't mix well. Perhaps I should have known that a short story collection based entirely on the premise of meet-cute and instant-attraction would not be my cup of tea, but considering the great reviews it was getting and its roster of incredible authors, I thought I'd give it a go. And it's not a surprise that it was, for the most part, a disappointment. Maybe it's one of those cases of, "It's not you, it's me!" Because for readers who don't mind stories about instant-attraction, and reading about your main character getting the warm fuzzies within 2 seconds of meeting their potential love interest, this might be perfect for you. But for me? I found myself rolling my eyes throughout 90% of these stories.

Which is not to say that there weren't some standouts. There totally were, and from a lot of the authors that I had already been anticipating good things from. I found some new authors whose work I enjoyed so much that I'd be willing to pick up their other works too. There were some creative twists to the meet-cute trope, some amazing writing, some really nuanced characters, and some stories that I would have no issue picking up 300-page books of. But on the flip side, there were a lot of stories trying to do too much with too little, trying to sound quirky and edgy and unique but coming off pretentious and try-hard. But let's stop all that, and jump right into the individual ratings.

Also, for the sake of full disclosure: I did not read Dhonielle Clayton's story as several reviewers have pointed out that it is aphobic. I have also refrained from rating it.

1. SIEGE ETIQUETTE BY KATIE COTUGNO - 1 star. First of all, there was no reason for this story to be told in second-person except to maybe look edgy. It made the narrative seem clunky and awkward. Secondly, I will NEVER be on board with cheating narratives that are passed off as “cute.”

2. PRINT SHOP BY NINA LACOUR - 3 stars. I liked that this didn’t focus necessarily on the relationship’s development but more on a side-task that eventually led to the relationship's development. It was told well, and I loved the setting.

3. HOURGLASS BY IBI ZOBOI - 3 stars. This was really nice. I loved the way it focused on a wide scope of things like the main character’s friendships, dreams and university aspirations. I felt like I knew her. The meet-cute aspect itself lacked spark though.

4. CLICK BY KATHERINE MCGEE - 3.5 stars. This was fun! It reminded me a little too much of a couple of Black Mirror episodes but I liked how it was told and the characters were given distinct personalities.

5. THE INTERN by Sara Shepard - 1 star. This was cringe-worthy lmao.

6. SOMEWHERE THAT’S GREEN by Meredith Russo - 3 stars. I enjoyed how well-developed all the characters were, and it was a good length. The topics discussed were also done deftly. I don’t know how I feel about the love interest, though, and how her coming-out was handled.

7. OOMPH by Emory Lord - 4.5 stars. *yells incoherently* THIS IS MY FAVORITE ONE, IT WAS SO CUTE AND WELL-WRITTEN WITH A REALLY UNIQUE AIRPORT SETTING AND GAH *flails*

8. THE DICTIONARY OF YOU & ME BY JENNIFER L. ARMENTROUT: 3 stars. I liked the concept and the setting, but the dialogue was so cheesy. 😩

9. THE UNLIKELY LIKELIHOOD OF FALLING IN LOVE BY JOCELYN DAVIES: 4 stars. YAY for girls in STEM! I loved the concept of this, and it was told so fluidly with an interesting format (like how you structure a Statistics paper!). Also super props for including a realistic, positive family dynamic on top of everything else in a short story!

10. 259 MILLION MILES BY KASS MORGAN: 3 stars. Cute idea, and I thought the way the story progressed was unpredictable and interesting. The love interest had that manic-pixie-dream-girl vibe to her, though.

11. SOMETHING REAL BY JULIE MURPHY: 4 stars. I would definitely read a whole book with this premise and these characters. It was also kind of relatable because I'm also involved in fandom culture, and before I met my favorite celebrity, I had this nagging question of "what if he's not who I think he is?" So, integrating that and diverting the attention was really clever! 👌🏽

12. SAY EVERYTHING BY HUNTLEY FITZPATRICK: 1.5 stars. Yet another story told in second-person, rendering it clunky. @ authors, stop using second-person just to be quirky. It doesn’t work, it makes the whole piece sound pretentious and it ruins an otherwise good story.

13. THE DEPARTMENT OF DEAD LOVE BY NICOLA YOON: 2.5 stars. I'm so mad about this one because this had, by far, the most fascinating world of all the stories I read but it was carried out so lazily. The meet-cute aspect of it was such a let-down with things being wrapped up ridiculously quickly in the last few paragraphs. It's a shame, because this is one of those stories that could have really benefited from being longer - perhaps even novel-length. But as it exists now, it wasn't what it could've been. :(

BEST 3: Oomph by Emery Lord; The Unlikely Likelihood of Falling in Love by Jocelyn Davies; Something Real by Julie Murphy.
NOT-SO-GOOD: Say Everything by Huntley Fitzpatrick; Siege Etiquette by Katie Cotugno; The Intern by Sara Shepard.
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Very sweet overall. 

Short stories are always a hard sell in our library, but this book has enough big name authors and a great topic that it'll move.
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