Educated

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 23 Apr 2018

Member Reviews

A memoir that would be preposterous fiction -- proof that truth is stranger than fiction. The author was raised in rural Idaho in an extremist Mormon/survivalist family who, despite the lack of an education, grew up to be a Cambridge PhD. Sometimes very difficult to believe, this is a fine example of resilience of the human soul. Although sometimes the narrative drifts into so much introspection that I was a bit bored, most of the time I was glued to the story. For fans of other memoirs like Running with Scissors or fiction like Room.

NOTE: The author is clear that her father's beliefs were a corruption of the teachings of the LDS (Mormon) church, and is not critical of the...

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Quite a fascinating memoir about the author's childhood growing up in a family that shuns formal education and modern medicine, only to experience a seismic shift in worldview when she took herself off to college at seventeen.

Really gripping in the first half, the book becomes a more emotional piece about family dynamics towards the end.
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I'm still trying to wrap my mind around this book. When you see the title "Educated," you automatically think "school," but by the end of Tara's memoir, the word holds much more weight. Life experiences, valuable role models and mentors, and constant self-discovery all contribute to a person's education, and no one's path to becoming educated is the same. Tara's unconventional path is a testament to that and should give hope to anyone who feels like taking control of their life is impossible.

Tara's story is a truly remarkable one - until the age of 16, she had no formal education and was living in a house mostly cut off from the modern...

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EDUCATED
Tara Westover

MY RATING ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️▫️
PUBLISHER Random House
PUBLISHED February 20, 2018

A gripping, heartbreaking memoir of a woman who, against all odds, overcomes immense family obstacles to gain an education, opening her eyes to a world she never knew existed.

SUMMARY
TARA WESTOVER never went to school, never saw a doctor and did not have a birth certificate. Her parents were Idaho survivalists, and wanted nothing to do with the government, schools or hospitals. She and her six brothers and one sister lived off the land. Her mother was a midwife and healer and treated every family malady—cuts, burns, broken bones, and head trauma— with herbs and oils. At age 10, Tara is...

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Incredible true story of young girl raised in a survivalist family where the word of God and her father rule her upbringing.  Amazing the strength and courage she had to muster to educate herself and escape that small tiny world she only knew.
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Two different worlds converge and collide in this autobiographical account of a young woman growing in self worth and worldly knowledge. The imagery portrayed through her writing was evident on the first page of the Prologue. I was drawn into the pictorial account of her writing by the vivid phrases used to portray the geography where she was raised. The story gave an open account of the trials that familial relationships go through when faced with conflicting personalities and challenging mental health issues. As the author grew in understanding through education, she was forced to acknowledge discrepancies in what she had been taught growing up and what she learned through advancing...

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While I was moved by Tara's story, I was less impressed by the storytelling.  This was an intense read and I kept wanting it to just be over and for Tara to tell of her happy ending.  For me this would have been a better inspirational talk or magazine article than a book.
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I found it difficult to put this book down!  Westover's story was fascinating.  It wasn't perfect - there were problems with pacing here and there - but then again, I don't think I'd trust the veracity of a perfectly paced memoir.  I wish her all the best, and I'm glad I read her story.
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Loved this story of a girl who can step away from her family and move forward to reach unheard of levels of accomplishment and happiness. She did it with dignity and no need to trash her parents or their beliefs. Thank you for not making the Mormons look like strange fanatics, but acknowledging it was her father taking his beliefs too far.
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Fabulous book.  Thoroughly loved.  Highly recommend!
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A memoir covering Westover's childhood growing up in Idaho with an unstable, violent family, obsessed with preparing for the end of the world, to her escape into higher education <i>Educated</i> was a difficult book to read. Not because it is technically difficult, but because I was mentally screaming at the abuse she had to endure at the hands of her family, even into her adulthood.

Furthermore, I was surprised by the tone of the book. I wanted her to condemn her family for what they had done to her (I really, really wanted her to!) but Westover makes few judgments as she lays out the facts for us.

Overall, it's an interesting, hard read. Maybe not my cup of tea...

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Of first note from my reading of Educated: A Memoir is that the book is nicely written.  What I expected to find in these pages was a nonfiction story about the education system, but the book is far more personal and literary than that.  This expectation is probably due to the research articles I spend my time reading, and I am happy to report that this book was far more engaging.

The book is also the amazing account of one person's childhood, path to adulthood, and, yes, the author's path to education.  I found Tara Westover's writing to be worth the investment both as a well-written story, and as a look at a different path to education.
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With Educated Tara Westover writes a startling memoir of her life growing up in a fundamentalist family that believes in complete self-reliance. Their anti-government attitude extends to public schools, and Tara receives very little homeschooling.
When Tara, despite opposition from family members, does attend university later, she is at first confused by the history surrounding the Holocaust and the Civil Rights Movement, because not only had she not been taught about these items at home, she had also been fed an ideology that did not square with them.
As she works on her formal education, she is torn by her loyalty to her family and her desire to learn and think critically. This...

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She was the youngest of seven, one sister, five brothers. Raised on a mountain top in Idsho, by a survivalist father and midwife mother . Of the Mormon religion, her father preached the coming of the end days, intrusion by the government, built a bomb shelter, stockpiled fuel, food, guns. He ruled with an iron fist, the word of God and the family fell in line. Though there was another factor in her father's psyche that she wouldn't understand or figure out until much later. There were no doctor visits, no immunizations, no formal schooling, no friends other than family, so many things not allowed. They were in effect totally off the grid. Yet, somehow this young woman manages to...

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It is inevitable that a reader/reviewer will be attracted to books of similar subjects, and nowhere was it more evident than two books I read recently -- Kristin Hannah's The Great Alone and this debut work by Tara Westover, Educated. Both present an isolated family controlled by a delusional charismatic father. Hannah's tragedy plays out in the far north of Alaska, while Educated is centered in the deep wilderness of Idaho. To me, Westover's memoir is by far the more powerful for being true. With no defense but her own developing mind, Tara fights the sick family dynamic created by her paranoid father and his perverted view of the will of God. The extraordinary fact that...

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Wow. Just Wow.

I described this book, poorly, to my husband as "a Glass Castle on steroids," but of course, it is similar but also nothing the same.

It boggles my mind what some endure, and how they detach from it (or survive it) to go on to lead normal and/or successful lives, and others cannot/do not.

There were times when this book was almost impossible to continue, it was so horrible to imagine. 

I am glad I read this book and wish Tara Westover the very best of everything.

Thank you to Netgalley for the opportunity to read this amazing book.
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Wow. Just wow. What a story of strength and tenacity and the power of the human spirit.
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Wow. If you're looking for a book to assure you that you did, indeed, have a pretty decent childhood, here you go. I'm so glad Tara survived her harrowing upbringing and was able to get her "education."

*Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing an e-galley in exchange for an honest review.
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This book was one that touched me. Reading all that the family has been through was quite an emotional roller coaster ride.
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This was such an engaging book. I still cannot believe all the accidents that happened to this family and they all survived without hospital interventions. A sad commentary of parents who raise their children with their zealous religious beliefs. Such physical, mental, emotional abuse in this book. I felt the author ‘s deep commitment to her family and the anguish she experienced when she finally let them go and focused on herself . Tara understood the value of knowledge and how being educated creates a better self. Tara was lucky she encountered many good people on her journey. They saw the real Tara and with their guidance and love she was able to reshape herself . She made many...

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