Chimera

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 06 Nov 2018

Member Reviews

A fantastic graphic novel. Very reminiscent of Saga, but with its very own flavor.
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Unfortunately this one did not quite grab my attention. I found myself skimming a lot, dialogues that were supposed to be funny had no impact whatsoever and I wasn't interested in what was going on.
Which makes me sad, because plot about heists and such are usually my jam :(
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While I'm reading it, I feel a bit lost. The story itself is not clear enough. 
Only worth 1 star in my opinion.
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This was just cool! It was fun, exiting and action packed. It did show a hint of typical first comic in a series, but that's understandable. The need for world building and character development is there, and I wouldn't have it any other way. I will definitely be checking out this series further down the road!
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Even if this book seem to have everything to please me, I just never really been grip by it, maybe the story was a bit too slow for me, but I fine it a bit flat. Even if the illustration are beautiful, even if the universe look interesting, it lack of the little thing, the little spark, the would have let it become something more.
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DNF - got to a halfway, but the story was too scattershot and weird for me to feel like continuing.  Sure it looks great, but the different religious kinds (I think) battling each other (I think) for a Macguffin (I think), and the copious switching of timeline, all conspired to make me less and less interested in seeing the pretty artwork as I went on.  Marked up for the visuals.
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A ragtag gang of thieves tries steal a magical artifact in the midst of interstellar war in Tyler Ellis’s graphic novel Chimera. Ellis’s book has good action sequences, chrisp artwork, and several well-developed characters. There is some real strength in the artist’s experimentation on the page, and in the building of the world’s religions. 

The issues of this book occur in the constant shifting of time. Ellis indicates each switch by labeling the page as ‘Then’ or ‘Now.’ This device does not permit the reader to spend enough time with any one character or story line. And unfortunately, the payoff is not worth the energy it takes to figure when in time each event is happening.

Thank you to Comicker Press and Tyler Ellis for the copy to review.
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