The Washington Decree

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 31 Dec 2019

Member Reviews

I'm crazy about this series! Right up there with Henning Mankel's Wallander (which is milder) and Jo Nesbo (more violent). Each entry is superbly suspenseful and the translation work is wonderful.
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I did not enjoy this novel at all. Too many unbelievable acts, complete lack of reality in what Congress, the Secret Service, and the country would do to stop an out-of-control Presidential administration. One example: in what world would an administration allow the daughter of the man suspected of ordering the killing the President's wife continue to work closely with the President in the White House? And that's just one example. The book is full of them. And the ending is so obvious!  I rarely say that I regret reading a book, but in this case, it's true.
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This is now here near as good as his previous books and not written as well. I wouldn't recommend this to anyone. But his others? Definitely.
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This book started out almost as a chilling look at next week in the USA.  It later plummeted into a silly adventure of the heroine saving the world from a deranged President.  Author expands book to great boring lengths of useless "filler".  Disappointed in how this book took a turn towards the ridiculous.
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Politics, greed, and corruption seem to go together in most political thrillers. Throw in the murder of the first lady, and you get an entertaining read.
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Chilling a Presidential election the First Lady killled the turmoil that ensues in the country.This is a stand alone thriller so well written so involving.#netgalley #penguindutton.
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Thank you Net Galley for the free ARC. I love all the department Q books and had high hopes for this book, but it was a little bit of a struggle. The premise is a presidential election in which the future first lady is killed and the subsequent presidency becomes chaos for the nation.. I liked the idea.
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This standalone by Jussi Adler-Olsen is not as fully developed as previous writings. Would pass on this one!
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The Washington Decree is a political thriller by Jussi Adler-Olsen (author of the Department Q novels - though this one is a standalone, not related to that series). Originally released in Danish in 2006, the English translation was released 6th Aug 2019 by Penguin on their Dutton imprint. This edition is 592 pages and available in hardcover, paperback, audio, and ebook formats.

I read the book at a difficult time. As an American who spends a lot of time in Scandinavia, I feel as though I have a different perspective from a lot of Americans who live in the USA full time. Outside the USA, the media coverage is very different, especially regarding political coverage and culture. It often feels quite surreal to see the things which are happening inside the USA and reading this book was often difficult and distressing for me personally. It is a very long book, which wouldn't normally be a problem (I like big books and I cannot lie), but this one did drag for me in places. I think my major problem was that, when I'm reading Lee Child, Barry Eisler, Brian Haig, and that crew, my suspension of disbelief allows me to read and process the fiction without being constantly yanked out of the narrative because it's too real. There also seemed to be somewhat more filler here than for a lot of political thrillers which tend to be more action and less cerebration.

There were some British idioms which made it into my eARC, but not many and I don't think they would present any problems in context for readers. They included 'sacked' for 'fired' and possibly one or two others, which I couldn't find again from my notes. There are several references to alt-right organizations (KKK, moral minority, hell's angels, and finally 'White-Headed Eagles', which I believe is fictive, but all too believable - I do -not- believe that it was a mistranslation). Otherwise, the translation (by Steve Schein) was, for me, seamless. I did read the original at release in Danish, and am shocked and dismayed by the current political landscape and the eerie prescient reflections ripped from the headlines today. I think it's brave (?) of Penguin and the author to release the book into the current climate. The language is R rated and I would say typical for the genre. There is murder, assassination, discussion of sexual assault and rape, miscarriage of justice, and the depressing inevitable tectonic grind of political extremism.

I was left with a feeling of inevitability and sadness and despair reading this book. Despite a solid denouement in the book, I just can't help feeling we aren't going to get anything remotely resembling a neat resolution in real life. Everything is changed and it certainly won't be much improved in my lifetime at least.

Three stars for depressing content, four stars for writing, rounded up for relevance.
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This book shows what can happen when greed and corruption are at the center of the Presidency.  It was a great read, however, it would have been nice to see a more realistic ending.  I thought that would have been better than the unrealistic one the author provided.
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The Washington Decree is a political novel that shows what corruption and ambition can do to the country. The new President is grieving for his dead wife while his chief of staff is planning to take over the Presidency by helping to turn the country into a police state at war with militias. The pace of the story is hectic as a continue game of cat and mouse is played out. My only quarrel with the book is the two incidences at the end of the book that are very unlikely.
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