Cover Image: Frizzy

Frizzy

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Member Reviews

I would like to thank netgalley and the publisher for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this story about a girl who feels unsure about her curly hair and how it’s deemed messy or ugly even by friends and family. Also shows the ups and downs of a mother/daughter relationship. Loved the art that went with it.
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This book sends out positive massage to everyone who worries about his/her appearances.  
The illustrations are nice. 
The book is suitable for grade 3 and up.
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Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an eARC of this title.

This is a lovely graphic novel that middle grade readers will enjoy! Marlene learns about self-love, acceptance, and embracing her beautiful curls in this coming-of-age story. A must-have for the middle school library! 

4.5/5 stars
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I wish I had a book like this when I was a kid! As someone with naturally curly hair, I found it difficult to style and control. Much like the narrator’s mother, I thought straight hair was prettier and would spend so much time straightening my hair every morning. I appreciate that this book breaks down that beauty standard and even goes into explaining why her mother had these beliefs. 

Another thing to note is all the bullying that the narrator experienced because of her hair. As an educator, I see how cruel kids can really be sometimes. Middle school is a hard age and bullies only make it worse. I didn’t like seeing the narrator get in trouble, but not seeing the kid who made fun of her dead dad receiving no consequences. It really made me feel for the narrator. It seemed like an unfair situation. 

The only thing I don’t like about in this book is in the beginning when the narrator goes to the salon, her hair is put into rollers so that it is styled into looser curls. Later at the party, her hair is referred to as being straight. I didn’t see her hair as being straight. I saw it as trying to fit into the stereotypical “pretty curls.”

I hope that this book reaches a large audience of young adults who are going through similar struggles and learn that their hair is beautiful, no matter the style.
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"Frizzy" is a wonderful graphic novel about a middle schooler named Marlene who has very curly hair and is told to maintain and straighten it in order to be "presentable." She longs to wear her hair naturally, though, despite the majority of people in her life putting her down for it. The story does a fantastic job at covering topics like ingrained beliefs, intergenerational ideas, and anti-blackness at a level at which middle schoolers could understand. I also very much enjoy the art and how relatable the characters themselves are. This is easily a new favorite graphic novel of mine!
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Thank you NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

This one hits more close to home so I'm sure there's bias I can't help. Following Marlene was a very realistic and painful showing of the prejudice curly hair is often treated with. 

We see how her family views her hair, as well as internalized racism and its generational effects. There were moments where I was shocked at how bullied this little girl was and was blamed for most of it, bringing up the opportunity for a conversation about victim blaming.

I wish this book existed when I was young, it would have helped a lot with how I viewed myself. Even to this day I get nervous if I let my hair go natural with my tight curls.

My favorite scenes have to be the ones where the audience is shown through the story how to properly care for curly hair. This is often a misunderstood subject so it was refreshing.

All in all a sweet book that touches down on topics such as PTSD, grief, generational prejudice, internalized racism, and what it means to love yourself.
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I got the chance to read an ARC of this book on NetGalley before it's release in exchange for a fair and honest review. 

A coming of age, learning to love yourself graphic for tweens and teens.
I really enjoyed this book! It addresses some of the behaviors that are passed down generationally that have helped keep the black and LatinX communities safe and assimilate into into the mold of "appropriate hair". 
Marlene is struggling with her "unruly" natural curls as she is finding out how important her appearance is to her family, and her classmates. All her life she has gone to the salon once a week to get her hair straightened, which she hates, but she endures it because it makes her mother happy, and gives them time together. 
Marlene doesn't want to feel like she is inferior anymore for having curly, frizzy hair, so she begins the journey of finding her authentic self by going natural with her doo. She soon discovers that letting her hair down isn't as easy as it seems. 
With the help of her best friend, a loving aunt who embraces her curls, and a lot of determination, Marlene learns that the way she feels about her own self is more important than what anybody else thinks.
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SUCH A DELIGHT AND TREAT AND JOURNEY!! As an adult reader, I just wanted to protect Marlene and was looking forward to her self-love journey, since from the outside you're well aware of all the factors that come to her personal trauma (consider this my anti-blackness and remainants of colonial ideology and eurocentric beauty standards claxon!). However, you are also reminded (just in case you'd forgotten) that kids and adults alike can be absolutely terrible and not realise the damage that their actions can cause on young people. 
WHICH IS WHY IT WAS SO WONDERFUL TO HAVE A POSITIVE INFLUENCE!! Who is not afraid of offering nuanced conversations and explanations behind these big concepts to said young people (hello generational trauma!). 
The stunning illustrations really brought the story to life and the overall product owns my whole heart. Cannot recommend this highly enough to readers of any age.
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This is a phenomenal graphic novel with great art and an engaging, relatable story. Young readers will empathize with the main character and her journey of self-acceptance. Highly recommended
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What a beautiful, delightful graphic novel filled with heart, emotion, and spectacular characters. I would definitely recommend this to any graphic novel lover or middle-grade reader looking for an emotionally compelling and educational story.
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This was just so cute and relevant!
I have curly hair myself and I used to experience similar situations in childhood. I've been called things just because of my curls and it's been hard for me to accept them but it's been easier over the years.
There is a lot to learn from Marlene, I hope -  and I'm sure - it will help little girls and boys to love their beautiful hair.
I highly recommend to everyone: accept your differences, you're beautiful just the way you are.
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A strong examination of ethnic hair and particularly Afro-Latino attitudes about looks, what is "acceptable" and the inner turmoil so many young Latine women in particular go through trying to fir into ALL the molds people think we should fit into a once! Strong title for young middle grade girls, will be adding to my library.
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Ughhhhh loveeeee. This graphic novel isn't out till October but I was lucky enough to get approved for an e arv on Netgalley. It's such an amazing book about accepting yourself as you are and not succumbing to beauty standards. I had never thought of the natural hair movement from the Afro Latinx perspective so this was a refreshing read and I LOVE that this was handled from the middle grade perspective. The aspects of school, family, friendship, and community are super great as well. I love the full color illustrations as well!
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Marlene’s cousin is having her quinceañera, so Marlene is at the salon with her Mami to get her thick natural curls smoothed and straightened. It’s painful, time-consuming, and necessary to make Marlene “presentable” - even beautiful? - for the festivities. Deep down Marlene just wants people to see her true self, and that includes flaunting her natural curls like her Tía Ruby, but her first attempt doesn’t go so well (thanks, bullies). Will a special weekend with her Tía help Marlene to embrace her curl power? Find out when Frizzy arrives in October of 2022!! 📚 🎨 🖌 👩🏽‍🦱
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As a curly haired girl, I grew up with all my role models fitting the Eurocentric narrative that straight hair was the standard of beauty, that curls were unkempt, unprofessional, the frizz that came with them a sign of laziness and disgustingness. Claribel Ortega has composed a graphic novel oozing with the journey to self- love and care, navigating the microaggressions and racism that underlies the curly hair hate in our world. I'd love to see more from Marlene's little world, as her journey is utterly heartwarming and what I would've loved to see and consume when I was her age, struggling with my hair and appearance and comparing to a standard that was not mine as a non-white little girl. The aesthetic and art for this graphic novel add to this beautiful feeling, and thus is an absolute win and recommendation from me :)
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Delightful middle grade read featuring an engaging, heartfelt topic, HAIR, and it’s role in building self confidence, self worth, community and self esteem.
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It was a pleasure to read this well-written graphic novel. The colors chosen were rich and the illustrations matched the text. The author put a lot of thought into the message that the story was going to convey to the reader.
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This is a delightful story about a young teen girl learning to embrace her natural hair and gently confronting her mother about the myth of "good hair," all with the support of an amazing best friend and badass "cool tia." It's got a great message, some seemingly truly excellent representation, and a kickass and sweet protagonist who loves drawing comics. I do think the mother character comes around a bit too quickly for someone who's insisted her daughter go to the salon with her EVERY Sunday for years, to "tame" her frizzy hair, but this is a book for younger kids, so I get it. It's got an incredibly sweet resolution, and the artwork throughout is absolutely stunning and beautiful, as is the color palette. Can't wait to carry this in the store I work in and recommend it to as many people as possible. If only for this reason alone, October can't get here quickly enough!!
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I loved this sweet story about a girl coming to terms with her natural hair. The artwork was beautiful and the characters stole my heart. Highly recommended!
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Empowering, heartfelt, emotional, and beautiful - Frizzy is a story about coming of age and handling generational trauma, pushing against harmful traditions while embracing culture and history.  I definitely cried while reading this and hope that this book makes its way into everyone's hands.  Even if the character's stories are different from one's own history, the impact and messages this story carries are important for everyone to hear.  Beautifully illustrated and powerfully written, Frizzy is absolutely a must-read story for all ages!
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