The 57 Bus

Pub Date   |   Archive Date 17 Oct 2017

Member Reviews

I was gifted an advanced copy of this ebook in exchange for my honest review. This is a tough, but important read for young people. Sasha is an agender teenager who loves to wear skirts. Richard is a classmate who hates Sasha because they are different, until the day he set Sasha on fire on the 57 bus. It's the true and tragic story of the hateful crime that changed both of their lives indefinitely. Slater tells this enlightening story with such skill and respect for Sasha's identity, that in the end, we readers long for a world in which that respect is universal.
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What a timely and and important nonfiction title for teens. The subject matter is specifically relevant to the lives of young people today, and the story of these events is told with a deep level of empathy. Restorative justice is introduced in the aftermath of the fire and trial. The author doesn't offer simple solutions, but rather asks difficult questions and is honest in showing an immensely complex situation.
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This book is full of important issues in today's world. I think it will make more of an impact on the youth today because it is a true account.
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In November of 2013, teenagers Sasha and Richard didn’t have much in common. Sasha attended a small private high school, had a small circle of supportive friends, and identified as genderqueer (preferring they/them pronouns). Richard attended large, public Oakland High School and had already spent a year in juvenile detention. Their lives overlapped for a few short minutes each day on Oakland’s 57 bus. One afternoon, while Sasha was napping in the back of the bus, Richard flicked a lighter near Sasha’s skirt. It erupted in flames and left the teenager with second and third degree burns requiring surgery and months of rehabilitation. Sixteen-year old Richard, who admitted to being homophobic...

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Thank you to Farrar Straus Giroux and Netgalley for the advance copy of this ebook. All opinions are my own. • 5/5 for this outstanding book. It is based on a true story about a boy who, without really thinking on his way home one day, lit the skirt of a fellow passenger on fire, causing serious injuries. The fellow passenger was an agender person, which sparked a national a cry that identified this as a hate crime. Did Richard do it on purpose, or was he really not thinking? The story is peppered with enlightening facts about gender and sexuality, as well as incarceration data about African-American males. A must read.
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Sasha, a white teen who does not identify with any gender, and Richard, an African American male, are on the same bus when a prank goes awry. Richard accidentally sets Sasha's skirt on fire and is now looking at the possibility of being tried as an adult. At first glance one might think this ticks all sort of diversity and bullying checkboxes, but ultimately this is a tale of empathy that lingers in the reader's mind long after the last page is turned.
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Thank you Net Galley for the free ARC. Interesting book with many difficult complex subjects - gender identification, the justice system, poverty and gangs. Sasha's and Richard's stories intersect the day Richard tries to set Sasha's skirt on fire. This story will keep you thinking for awhile
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Great, descriptive book. This will be a good way to bring up social justice with my teens in a way that will make sense to them.
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Wow--there was so much emotion in this book. I cried, I got angry, I got a TON of great information in this case, and this portrayal of both victim and culprit is eye-opening. Thank God there is a book for teens that addresses gender fluidity head-on. I cannot wait to take this to schools to booktalk.
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On the evening of November 4, 2013, Sasha Fleishman woke up from a nap on a public bus to find that they had been set on fire. Dashka Slater's The 57 Bus is a remarkable work written for young adults that examines the factors which led to this horrifying moment and the effects it had on victim, perpetrator, and the families and friends of both. First of all, it is incredibly impressive just how much this book manages to deal with. It addresses growing up both as a privileged, agender, white teenager and as an African American, male teenager from a rough area. It also looks at the problems associated with trying juveniles as adults, as well as the problems which can arise when...

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I was glad to get an ARC of this book. Thank you Netgalley! While I was touched by this true story I found the list of genders to be so very long. This might be off-putting or even boring to reluctant readers. I get why the author wanted the list in the book but in my opinion it would probably work better if it was located at the end of the book as a glossary or vocabulary. I will say this book is a must have for school and public libraries.
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very good book dealing with timely issues, and well written
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Excellent book presenting both sides of a criminal incident where a juvenile was charged with a hate crime. Very thought provoking
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I rarely if ever read non-fiction. When I do, it's usually memoirs. So I'll be honest: when I picked up the 57 bus I barely glanced at the back and I thought it was going to be a whodunnit thriller. But I'm kind of glad I thought that, because otherwise I would probably not have read this amazing piece of work. I was only fourteen when the main incident described in this book occurred, and I had no idea that it had even happened until reading this book. I was horrified, but, at the same time felt pity for both Sasha and Richard. This book brings up a lot of important questions about privilege, racism, transphobia, hate crimes, and the issues revolving the juvenile justice system. I want...

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The 57 Bus was an excellent read for all ages but especially teens in these times of injustice. This book does an excellent job of describing both sides of the story, providing depth while getting the message out. It was a wonderful story of forgiveness and moving on.
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The 57 Bus tells the story of an agender teen named Sasha who is lit on fire while sleeping on a bus by Richard in what some call a hate crime and in what Richard says was just a silly prank gone horribly wrong. Slater takes the reader through the events leading up to this event and then through the arrest, trial, and aftermath of that one horrific interaction. While the events of this book are difficult to read, the story of Sasha and Richard can be one of hope and respect. The emotional arc the parents of Sasha, and Sasha as well, take throughout their ordeal is one of the most important parts of this book. Yes, they were wronged in the most horrible of ways, but they grew stronger...

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Shocking story. Well-written and thought provoking. It will be an excellent conversation starter and aid for teaching tolerance in our schools and communities
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I rarely read YA non-fiction, but I made an exception for Dashka Slater’s The 57 Bus. As a librarian, I’ve been searching for ways to address social justice topics. While it’s liberal, my home state is predominantly white. Fortunately as a child I lived abroad, so I had exposure to diverse groups of people and experiences. Born and bred Vermonters don’t necessarily have that luxury. Living in a small, rural, white state is akin to existing in a bubble. And that bubble can make it challenging for residents to fully empathize with certain societal issues. Black Lives Matter is relegated to a news headline, rather than being a fully realized idea. Working with teens, my goal is to promote and...

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This was an extremely well researched and written chronicle of a horrific crime, but for me, more immediate, was the authors way of clearly and compassionately exploring the lives and the perspectives of the two young people and their families. Through this text I was able to better understand the feelings an definitions of asexual, trans, non-binary sexual identities. The crime is almost secondary to all that this book is about and I would highly recommend this as a must read for all. Thank you to Dashka Slater for this very important work. Well done.
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Warning! The words "transgender and queer" show up on the first page.
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