Crazy Horse Weeps

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 05 Mar 2020

Member Reviews

I requested this title on NetGalley because I am trying to expand my reading, both in non-fiction and items written by marginalized people.  Joseph Marshall's ,"Crazy Horse Weeps" is a series of essays which detail the history of Native American Tribes, specifically the Lakota, and the struggles they have faced since the beginnings of European influence on North America. 
I'll admit, I was not nearly as engaged in this work as I am for many of the fictional tiles I read.  There was lots of good information and Marshall's call to action to the remaining Lakota is compelling.  However, I found the essays choppy and difficult to follow.
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A very intersection book. It’s written in the form of a historical biography. Written in the format makes it very different than similar books. I’ve learnt historical facts regarding Native  Americans and how badly they were treated by new comers. It’s certainly a book that I’d keep on my bookshelf for my children and their children to read so they can learn on how people were treated and how we should treat all people with love and respect.
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This book is a collection of essays on what it means to be Lakota in modern America. This is also a book that should be read by historians. It shows how the consequences of years and years of cultural destruction have wrought havoc on the Lakota. It is told from the perspective of a man who was raised by traditional Lakota grandparents and has firsthand knowledge of these things. His essays are disturbing, but the stories need to be told. The destruction of Lakota culture has come with a heavy price. 

The people on the reservation live in poverty and have a higher rate of death from avoidable causes than the general population. The younger generations are being raised to know more about TV stars, music, and popular culture than their own rich cultural traditions. Sadly, this means those cultural traditions may be lost. Author Joseph Marshall III writes of these losses and also offers hope that Lakota culture can be saved and renewed. The last chapter sent shivers down my spine. Powerful stories. 

I am sad to say that I missed an opportunity to hear the author speak at my local college a couple months ago.  I wish I’d known about it sooner. He has a very passionate message that needs to be heard and heeded. Before it’s too late to save what’s left.
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A series of essays on the history of the Lakota tribe of Native Americans. Sad, tragic, frustrating. A history of how the Lakota has been mistreated. And of how they are struggling to maintain their culture. It's awful that "Americans" involve themselves in so many people's struggles, all across the globe, yet we turn away from the situation facing people in "our" own country.
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A fascinating book about the loss of the native American culture and it's effect on the native American people a must read
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"Hope is the refusal to give in, the refusal to yield."

In this collection of essays, Lakota author Joseph M. Marshall III writes about the past, present, and future of the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota people.  Equal parts mournful, nostalgic, and optimistic, "Crazy Horse Weeps" documents and reflects the thoughts of Marshall and many other Native voices regarding tribal and reservation issues, to include: poverty, addiction, the affects of colonization, health issues, and lack of tribal knowledge being passed down to the younger generations. These essays encourage dialogue regarding these issues, which leads to discussion of how to go forward by knowing the past, how to take charge in order to fight back against white colonization and assimilation, and how to prepare the next generation.
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An investigation into the fading Lakota culture by a Lakota tribal member.  The argument for maintaining the culture, language, and rituals is explained in detail.  This is a wonderful book for anyone interested in hearing from the source about the Native-American situation.  Much of the book is sad but there is hope to be found.  Fascinating on all levels.
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At its heart, this book seems to be by Lakota, for Lakota. There is a repetitive account of the tragic history of Native peoples, current examples of a lack of any change on the part of the white powers in the country, and a desperate plea to do everything possible to preserve and pass on Native culture and traditions to the next generation. There are good takeaways scattered throughout: “Hope is often the last resort, the last effort we make when all else has failed or fallen short.” and the one that struck me as most poignant: “Legality is a matter of power, not a matter of justice.” I didn’t find any new information for myself in this volume, but anyone who takes the time to read it will certainly feel the passion of Marshall’s message. It could be a go-to for inspiration or motivation toward support of a Lakota (or other Native) cause. A strong voice.
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Growing up in North Dakota, and living near a reservation, gave me a mixed view. This book, written from an insider point of view, was enlightening in many ways. I must admit that the very beginning gave me pause, simply because although "white" my ancestors struggled and had issues in their old country, and were also punished for speaking their language and keeping some of their culture once they got here. Granted there are many differences, and I am not trying to compare or judge which had a harder time, but I am just saying I wasn't interested in reading about history that would make me feel guilty for history that I cannot change. However, that being said, I stuck with the book, and once I got into the heart of the book I couldn't put it down. Filled with essays instead of chapters, it was eye-opening to read about the issues the Lakota and Dakota people have and are still struggling with, and made me rethink and consider that their voices need and have every right to be heard. Highly recommend this book and author. Well worth the read.
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