Own Your Weird

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 10 Sep 2019

Member Reviews

***Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review***
This was less a humorous self-help book and more about how to capitalize in the business world, which I was not really into.
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I found his point of view and topics/ideas to be helpful. There are ideas to think about and possibly put forth in ones life, depending on the reader. From work to personal, I think it can be a great reference for those who want to start saying no, to make a new start or to be themselves in one way or another.
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I thought this would be a self-help/personal development book, which this was at times, but not as much as I expected. It read more like a business book, specifically for those who want to strike out on their own. That being said, there were still aspects of Zook's work that spoke to me, specifically his message that just because something hasn't been done before doesn't mean it can't be done.  

I received a free copy of the book from NetGalley.
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Own Your Weird… and Capitalize on It

This is a somewhat peculiar book, which I suppose is not expected given its title and its subject. The author purports that the book will help you own your own weirdness. This isn't just on a personal level as one might think. In fact, the thrust of the book seems to be about how to take your own unique weirdness and turn it into a profit. The author himself has done quite a number of outrageous and unique things that are only possible in this age of the internet: he auctioned the rights to his own last name for a pretty penny, he got sponsorship for one of his books by selling tweet-sized ads in his book to online businesses, and he would wear others’ branded t-shirts and go about on social media for a price.

The book is split into three sections, owning your weird mindset, how he owns his weird, and creating your own weird blueprint for business and life. The book is surprisingly thought provoking. The pace at first is a bit frenetic and odd, but once he gets into the meatier chapters, he simmers down a little and actually does provide some nuggets of wisdom. Each chapter ends with a brief exercise to help you find your own weirdness or express it, based on the chapter topic. 

The problem with the book, though, is that the author is essentially everywhere in it. It was like he couldn't keep from discussing how someone could cultivate their own unique weirdness without injecting his story into it, even in the third section. I did find this a bit annoying and perhaps a little pretentious. Also, parts of the book just seemed like some random ideas thrown together. My sense is that he did much of this book on the fly. He does seem to have enough experience and insight that he could have created a pretty fantastic book, but it falls short due to the apparently spontaneous nature of the writing and a singular obsession with inserting himself into every bit of the book. 

Although the subtitle says that this book is about work, life, and love, it mostly talks about how to use your uniqueness to start a business or profit in some other way. There are only very small sections on the other topics. Still, however, I will admit that I found this to be a rather intriguing read, and it did get me into thinking more about my own uniqueness and how I may want to let that shine going forward.
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In this book, Jason Zook talks about owning your weirdness and making it a part of your authentic life. This, too, is a book on values disguised as weird (or not giving a f* from the Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*). The book was full of stories of how Jason has owned his weirdness in his life and his business. While the advice came from a good place, most of the work and life part will be valid to you if you own an online business and sell products to people. Overall a fine read.

I received a free copy of the book from NetGalley.
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Okay, so clearly, I haven't been cashing in on my weirdness, because reading all about Jason's escapades just shook me to the core!
I wonder, the first quarter of this book has some kind of energy, reading it you'd feel as though someone was excited about what they were telling you and the words just keep pouring out- in other words, the pace is a bit too hurried and I had to take a step back, read it slowly to try and grasp what point he was trying to make.
We've all got some weird juice in us and reading this book is one sure way of getting your confidence up a notch and working on some things.
Thanks Netgalley for the eARC.
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