Cover Image: The Other F Word

The Other F Word

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date:

Member Reviews

One of my fave ever anthologies. Beautiful stories that––in their authentic and innocent portrayals––force us to confront our own biases. The stories are moving and gorgeous. Highly rec 
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Thank you to Netgalley for sending me an arc of this book - this review is rather late but I loved this. I thought it was empowering and beautiful. It was a super short read but I enjoyed every second of it
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3.5/5

A raw, beautiful anthology - though as with anthologies in general, I enjoyed some sections more than others.
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I think this is an essential addition to any high school library, or any book collection teenagers have access to. Between the poetry, anecdotes, advice, and humour, there will be something here for anyone to connect to. This is really a book that could change lives, and I hope it gets into the hands that need it.
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//Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review//

As a fat person, I still struggle with calling myself one. The word has so much painful memories behind it, from doctors, "friends", strangers, and even my family. My grandma would constantly tell me how I need to exercise and eat healthier, because I don't want to be fat. "Fat is not beautiful."

This is the book that made me feel better about myself. The numerous entries in this anthology share positive and negative experiences, but mainly how to grow into loving one's body. The list of fat-positive bloggers and fashion companies at the end had me crying because I absolutely hate shopping for clothes in public, because it felt like there weren't clothes for me.

I think this is a must-read for people, because it shows how the body positive movement isn't "promoting obesity", but promoting self-confidence and self-love.
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The perfect introduction for teen readers to fat politics and movements such as fat acceptance, health at every size and body positivity.  Adult readers, particularly those who are well versed in the politics of fat, may find some of it reductive or simplistic, but for young people it's an essential collection of essays.
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I absolutely loved this book!

Often when I read collections of essays or stories by a variety of authors, I like a few of the pieces but not all of them. I loved every essay and piece of work in this collection. I could relate to most of them, and I learned new things from the ones I couldn’t relate to.

This collection is so important. It isn’t just for fat readers. Everyone can benefit from reading this book, because it gives a glimpse into the lives of fat people. Being fat is treated as even worse than other traits. When sexist and racist jokes aren’t allowed in mainstream media today, fat jokes still remain. This may be because people think you can change your weight easier than you can change your skin colour or gender. However, this is not always the case.

I’m so glad that I had the opportunity to read this book. It really means a lot to me! I would have loved to have read it when I was a fat teenager. I hope this book gets the recognition it deserves!

Thank you Abrams Kids for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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Anthologies are really hard to rate and this was even harder than normal because I wanted to love it so much. Unfortunately, the disparity in the quality of stories was pretty bad. The stories that were good were really good and the stories that were bad were really bad. I think it tried to include *everyone* without realizing that not everyone who was included has an approachable voice.
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I really enjoyed a great many things about this book. Characters were fleshed out and the plot was well spaced. Some of the secondary storylines could've used a bit more page space but all in all an enjoyable read!
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Anthology/collection of illustrations, pieces, and poems by fat creators. A love letter to all the fat teenagers out there. Pretty diverse touches a variety of topics like gender identity, sexuality, fashion, love, media representation… Very personal pieces, beautiful design of the book. A must for anthology lovers (like me!). Highly recommended.
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I wasn't able to read through the whole book before archive date, but what I did read was awesome! I'm glad we're seeing more books geared towards fat acceptance :)
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While a couple of the essays weren't my favorite, so many were absolute winners (and written by womxn I admire). I've already been recommending this to library patrons and friends. There's something in here for everyone.
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I really wanted to love this -- it's a subject I know well.

I'm so glad to see that there's an anthology like this out there, but I did feel like the essays were incredibly uneven in quality and focus. I'm picky, and I've read so many incredible essays on the subject, Maybe my expecatations were too high? That's part of it. 

All that said, Samantha Irby is queen of all her things, and I thought her essay was a stunner.
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I really liked this book. I think it would be perfect for teen readers and is a great place for fat-friendly resources and for finding new people to follow. The book is beautifully diverse and I loved the fact that even disabled voices were included. There were a couple of essays that were a bit long-winded or repetitive and just fell flat for me but on the whole, I was inspired and moved. I highly recommend checking this book out, especially if you are just starting out your body positivity/fat acceptance/self-love journey. It makes you realise that you are not alone and there are so many more important things about you than your size.   

I received a copy of the ebook via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review
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When I first saw this book on Netgalley, I felt that I had to get it because it’s such an important book, and I also wanted to know about the body positivity and fat acceptance movement. And I’m so glad that I got the opportunity to read this one.

I feel that this book is important for me at this age, even though it’s focused more in catering towards youngsters. In the world I grew up in, I don’t know if this would have helped a teenage me, but I definitely need it now. This collection of essays, poems and art by fat activists and artists is necessary because first and foremost, it’s about making you realize that every body size is natural and every person deserves to be respected and treated with dignity, irrespective of their size. It’s about understanding that our worth doesn’t depend on us conforming to the society’s beauty standards. It’s about not letting the prejudiced words of others affect us and loving ourselves the way we are and living our best life. It’s about finding a community of people like us who understand each other and can help in facing the struggles we encounter everyday. And finally it’s about fighting for the right to exist and take up space in this world, without worrying about people who feel uncomfortable just because of our existence.

To conclude, I wanna say that this is brilliant collection of writings by a diverse group of people and I think everyone should read it. I loved how representative it was of race, sexuality, ethnicity and this is important because being fat is just one part of our identity and intersectionality is even more important. If you have ever struggled with accepting your body for whatever reasons and would love to find some resources, then this book has lot of information in that regard. If you want to know more about the body positivity movement or be a part of it, then this book is good beginner primer. Or even if you just want to read the experiences of other fat people who are a bit ahead of you in their journey of accepting themselves, do checkout this book. I promise you will find something in these pages that will resonate with you.
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A fantastic collection of stories, essays, art, and other pieces that not only reclaim the narrative around but also celebrate being fat. A necessary addition to all collections!
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1.) The list of contributors: The range of voices included in this collection celebrating loving your body and telling your own story is incredible. From authors like Julie Murphy to illustrators like Jiji Knight, there is something for everyone. I loved reading essays from favorite authors, but I also adored discovering new voices and artists.

2.) The premise: As someone who is fat, it's sometimes hard to find solid representation in books, fiction and non-fiction. This collection celebrates a community of people whose bodies happen to be fat. They are men, women, trans, non-binary, white, black, brown, mixed race, young, old, disabled, neurotypical, and neurodivergent, and more. They are writers, artists, podcasters, and more. I wish I had this book for myself when I was a teenager, and I'm so, so glad that teens will now have this book.

3.) My personal favorite essays, Jana Schmieding's "Chubby City Indian," and Hillary Monahan's "Fatness & Horror: The Match Made in Not Heaven": Jana Schmieding's writing is lyrical and lush, my favorite style for creative nonfiction. She discusses her intersectional identify as a fat, Lakota Native woman and what that looked like growing up and as an adult. Hillary Monahan's essay smartly analyzes fat characters and horror, where fat characters typically 1) don't exist on screen, or 2) are the first to die because...fat, apparently. She highlights a few recent successes like Ghostbusters with Melissa McCarthy but rightly points out that these are still few and far between, not to mention the lack of intersectionality among those fat characters. If I could frame both of those essays, I gladly would.
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Necessary, timely, and liberating. Manfredi has curated a phenomenal selection of fat creators. This would have been a revolutionary read for middle school/high school me and I look forward to putting it in young hands at the library now.
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We need more stories like this, talking about body image and fatness with young people, so that more young people can learn tools to love their bodies and feel seen in the world. This collection of holds some powerful stories from a diverse group of writers that can help young people to feel less alone and more understood in their world, which is one of the most powerful things that teens and young people need. I would definitely recommend this book for others to read and buy a copy for my library.
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Let me preface my review by saying that as a fat queer woman, I am over the moon that this anthology exists. Fatness is a topic that I haven't seen discussed much, and it is amazing that there is an anthology for teens about fat positivity that includes many amazing authors. 

However, I found it a frustrating read. I would say 80% of the essays were extremely repetitive. While the messages of these essays were great - they were all about self love and fat positivity - I think that there were a lot of different areas that these essays could have explored. I didn't personally think that there was a need to have four different essays all about fat fashion, or middle-school shame. Yes, these are great topics, and many people have similar experiences, but it got to the point where I was bored by these particular themes. My ARC also didn't have any of the art, which I would have liked to have seen. 

However, I still wholeheartedly recommend this book, as I understand that I am older than the target demographic and there is a real lack of books that talk about fat activism and body positivity, especially for teens. The book should also be commended for the diversity of its authors, which included nonbinary people, people of colour, aromantic and asexual people, and Indigenous people. I personally loved 'Fatness & Horror: The Match Made in Not Heaven' by Hillary Monahan, 'For the Love of Ursula’s Revenge Body' by Julie Murphy, and all of the poems by Miguel M. Morales as these went further than many of the other pieces, and far less repetitive. 

So, even though I wasn't totally in love with the anthology, I still have to give it 5 stars, as it is so important. I might also be buying myself a copy, simply to further support the authors.
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