Birds of a Feather

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Member Reviews

This book has delightful pictures that children will love. Most children younger will not understand the idioms even after discussion, but this is a read-to-book and great for discussions especially with older children.
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This is a fun, engaging learning tool. My rating 4.25.

As adults we have heard idioms all our lives but you can well imagine that a child might wonder what is meant by “ants in his pants” or “bull in a china shop”. And what are “goosebumps” or a “wild goose chase”?

This book covers sixteen or so well-known idioms. The book states the idiom with a whimsical, interpretive and engaging illustration. The meaning of the idiom, and an example using it in a sentence, is shown upside down on the bottom of the page. Some images, like “barking up a tree” and “raining cats and dogs” are perfectly fitting. Other illustrations did not fit as well in my view, even though they were all fun.

I love words and the meaning of words, so I was naturally drawn to this. I have also read and enjoyed two other books by Vanita Oelschlager. I found the tone and intent of the work delightful and think it would be wonderful to use with children.

Source: 2019 NetGalley.
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A beautifully illustrated book with pictures that match the idioms they’re representing. It was grey how simple the book was. An idiom, a drawing and what the idiom represents. This book was fun to read and had me giggling at a lot of the drawings. 

I’d give a bunch of examples of the idioms in the book but I don’t want to let the cat out of the bag.
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Beautiful illustrations!  Love the concept of helping children understand idioms through pictures as well as written explanation.  As a librarian who reads to her students I would have liked the explanations written right side up (instead of upside down as they appear in this book).  Some of the pictures are not what I would have pictured, but, they are still amazing.  I will be adding this to my library!
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The pages with the idiom written out and the adorable and detailed image is amazing. The icing on the cake is the two small lines (smaller text and upside down on the page so it's not obvious) explaining what the idiom means and using it in a sentence. 
I just read this book to my four year old and she loved it but I could see it being perfect for someone who'd have heard about half or more of the idioms before. Overall an adorable book that would be perfect to read to kids, for young readers, or even adorable for someone new to the English language.
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Super cute! Not sure who liked the book more the kids or myself. Idioms. The illustrations were funny and wonderfully drawn. We will be reading and laughing again and again.
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Using Robin Hegan’s adorable illustrations, Vanita Oelschlager teaches children about idioms such as hogwash, goosebumps, spring chicken, and snug as a bug in a rug. Adding to the fun is a sentence using the expression, which can be read when the book is turned upside down. By making learning so much fun, kids will be delighted to learn new phrases and improve their reading skills.
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Birds of a Feather is a cute introduction for children on Idioms. Each page has one idiom in bold letters with an adorable illustration to show the idiom. When you flip the book over, the explanation for the idiom is in small letters with a sentence including the idiom to explain further. The author has a wonderful explanation at the back of the book called “What are Idioms” with an illustration and the history of that one particular idiom. 

Although I found this book totally adorable with its illustrations, I wish it would have had just a little more. The history that the author did for the one featured idiom at the back of the book was informative and interesting. I wish we would have gotten more information for the other idioms featured in the book. Also, I had an issue with the extremely small print and having to flip the book. The arc I received was in digital format, so possibly the book format print is not as small. For young children, this book is cute and fun and they will probably get a good laugh at it, for the slightly older child they may need a little more as I mentioned above.
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This is a darling book about idioms that can be used for a teaching tool for children. I can see my nephews thoroughly enjoying this book while actually learning something new.
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A children's book of idioms and silly illustrations of those idioms. I can see my granddaughter giggling with each page. A good teaching guide as to what an idiom is. I would recommend this book for children.
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Birds of a Feather by Vanita Oelschlager is an excellent book to teach and review some of the most commonly used idioms in the English Language. The artwork is beautiful, colorful, and eye catching. This book could be used to introduce Idioms or for a review of Idioms. I would suggest it for purchase to be used in Language Arts Classrooms Kindergarten thru Eighth Grade.
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{My thoughts} – This is a nice book about idioms. It helps to introduce just how silly they are when taken literally. The illustrations are nice and the book appears to have been well thought out.
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This is a wonderful way to teach children about idioms. Every page has an idiom not only listed but also beautifully illustrated and giving its literal meaning. The illustrations are hilarious and sweet, especially as they all feature birds or animals. My favourites were ‘Bring home the bacon,’ ‘No spring chicken’ and ‘Let the cat out of the bag.’ 

The meaning of the idiom, along with an example of its usage in a sentence, is written at the bottom of each page, inverted, and in minute lettering, so that it can be referred to only when you really try to read it. Unfortunately, the writing was so small that I had problems reading it at all.

“Birds Of A Feather” concludes with an explanation of how a particular idiom originated, and encourages readers to find the origins of other idioms, as the words that are used in an idiom are generally not meant literally, however, neither are they a random group of words thrown together.

{Thank you to NetGalley, VanitaBooks, LLC and the author for a free copy and for giving me the opportunity to provide an honest review.}
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Vanita Books and NetGalley provided me with an electronic copy of Birds of a Feather: A Book of Idioms and Silly Pictures.  I was under no obligation to review this book and my opinion is freely given.

Author Vanita Oelschlager has done a great job of explaining the idea of idioms on a child's level, but where this book really shines is with the illustrations.  Robin Hegan has made the book come to life, with vibrant illustrations that have life and movement.  Each idiom is displayed with such character that will captivate children while teaching them something new.

Each idiom is given a definition, along with the phrase used in a sentence that children will understand.  The idea of an idiom is a complex one, but both the author and the illustrator have done a good job of bringing it down to a child's level.  I would absolutely recommend the book for both a classroom setting or a home library, as Birds of a Feather will help both parents and educators explain the concept of the idiom in a fun and colorful manner.
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Cute children's book. Great story. Illustrations are beautiful. Children will enjoy. Animals are great in the story
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My boys really enjoyed this book. It has tons of idioms and silly pictures. They giggled throughout the story. We really enjoyed the illustrations and learning things like what ants in your pants means. Will be reading again and again. Recommended.
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This is not really what I was expecting, and it kind of missed the mark for me. This is basically just a collection of illustrated idioms (some illustrated better than others; what was with the square "butterflies in your stomach"?) with basic descriptions of what the idioms mean. For example, "ants in your pants" means you are "excited and squirmy and can't sit still". Unfortunately, that wasn't enough for me. I wanted to know why that combination of words came to be used in that way, and I probably would've loved learning about the origins of these idioms (since I would've known the basic meanings of many of them as a child, anyway). There is one example of this at the end of the book, where "barking up the wrong tree" is given a more thorough treatment. I would've preferred the whole book to be like that, with the origins of these idioms explained, rather than just their meanings.

The illustrations are hit and miss for me, and I don't like the way the explanations are printed upside down in tiny print, necessitating flipping the book around if you want to read them (I read this on a laptop, which was pretty awkward). I also don't like how "bring home the bacon" has to adhere to gender stereotypes with the phrase: "In our family, my dad brings home the bacon." This book was published in 2009; why can't the mom bring home the bacon?

Overall, this wasn't great. If the author had extended the idiom origins throughout the whole book, rather than just having one footnote at the end, I would've liked this one more.
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Birds of a Feather introduces children to the concept of idioms in a very simple and straightforward way. For each idiom, there is a large and colorful illustration demonstrating what one might think the phrase means based on the individual words (for “barking up the wrong tree” there is an image of a dog barking up one tree, while the cat he is chasing resides at the top of the tree just behind him), followed by the actual meaning of the idiom and the phrase used in a sentence. 
It’s a very quick read and the illustrations are a lot of fun. My children just learned about idioms last year, in 1st grade, and my son has been inserting idioms into his speech ever since (and then informing me that he has just used an idiom, and what an idiom is). When I saw this book was available, I gravitated towards it for that exact reason. Two of my kiddos read it with me the second time around and they giggled at several of the illustrations, and both agreed that it was a good way to explain idioms to kids who might find them confusing.
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This book was just OK for me. From the illustration to the content. Thing i did like about the illustrations that they did show how silly some of the idioms my seem to a child.
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This is a book of idioms and silly pictures. There are things like raining cats and dogs and a picture of a little girl with an umbrella and cats raining on her, or Wild Goose Chase with a goose being chased by the police. Each one has what it really means written upside down on the page. This book is beautifully illustrated and the characters are really cute (love the ants). It has an explaination in the back of what an idiom is and explains how it has a hidden meaning. I recommend this book to 3-5 yr. olds. I really think they would love the illustrations and learn at the same time. 
I received this book in exchange for my honest opinion.
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