Cover Image: Babbit and Joan, a Rabbit and a Phone

Babbit and Joan, a Rabbit and a Phone

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date:

Member Reviews

This book is adorable! What a sweet way to talk about tech Sabbaths! I love that during Babbit's time away from Joan, he has an adventure out in nature, makes friends, and figures out how to do things without Joan the phone. A great narrative that gives us permission to take a break from our phones.
Was this review helpful?
I could not open this book. It just kept giving strings of gobbledegook.   sorry, I am sure it is user error and nothing to do with you and I love the sound of the book. I will keep trying and hopefully will come back and review properly The stars are for the idea and cover.
Was this review helpful?
I loved this book! As an adult, I always try to keep my distance with my phone, and I understand in these times, children need to learn this from the very early ages. I'm sure adults would also learn a lot from it.
Was this review helpful?
This one was so cute, but it also gave a very necessary message. I love the format, and the fact that this is a children's book giving such a message. I think more advocacy on technology use is something that is highly needed. I love the art style and the colors, and the writing style is fun and fluid. Overall, I quite enjoyed this one.
Was this review helpful?
I love the premise of this book.  We live in a society where we are so tied to our phones and children at such a young age become addicted to devices.  This book shows the importance of putting down your phone and getting outside in nature and using your senses.  It also shows the importance of community and how we do need people.  Overall I highly recommend this book because of the message behind it.
Was this review helpful?
An adorable reminder about not letting our phones rule our world. With kids younger and younger getting phones nowadays, this is a great message for any families with young cell phone users.
Was this review helpful?
Babbit's phone has had enough. It never gets a break from all the work Babbit makes it do. Babbit decided to tuck his phone in and go outside on an adventure. Originally, he feels very lonely because everyone is so distracted by their phones. After a bit, he runs into a bear. Together, the two go on an amazing adventure through the woods and river. At the end of the day, Babbit returns home and tells his phone all about the fun he had with his phone-less day.
Was this review helpful?
Babbit & Joan, a Rabbit and a Phone by Denise Turu deals with a very important issue. We are missing out on life experiences by spending too much time on our phones. 
The story begins when the phones go on strike. Babbit’s phone, named Joan, is tired from texting and taking photos. To give his phone a much needed break, Babbit decides to spend the day without it. 
Babbit starts off feeling alone. His neighbors don’t notice him, they are too busy on their phones. As the rabbit starts walking through the forest, he begins to see things that he never noticed before. He gets lost and can’t find his way back home without his phone, but then he makes new friends. Eventually, Babbit and his friends get where they are going. They also learned a valuable lesson. 
Denise Turu’s story reminds children that there is a world waiting for them away from their phones. Technology is great, but so is getting away from it. 
The book teaches children that even phones need a break to recharge. To make a deal with their phones, like Babbit. “…And sometimes Babbit would go out on his own to explore the world.”
Was this review helpful?
A cute picture book about a rabbit who has to go without his phone for awhile. A good read aloud and addition to a collection of picture books to discuss digital citizenship and tech use.
Was this review helpful?
This is a very attractive picture book with a worthy message. I did struggle a little bit to understand what age group it was aimed at since obviously EYFS children wouldn’t have mobile phones. And there are a couple of problematic moments (like wandering off with no way of getting help and being too easily trusting of strangers). However, it’s essentially a good concept with cute illustrations.
Was this review helpful?
Babbit the Rabbit must learn to fend for himself when the phones go on strike in this rather confusing picture book.

My issue:

Okay so phone are sentient beings who strike. I'll follow that.


But then Babbit puts his phone to bed for a nap and heads off to explore. During this every single house he walks by shows another on a phone.


So whose phones went on strike? Were these ones being forced to work? This is some pretty heavy implications...
Was this review helpful?
The illustrations are bright and fun and the story is short and sweet. This book is perfect for Screen-Free Week in April. Without any negative judgement about phones and technology, this book shows children how important it is to have a balance.  This book would be useful to begin class discussions about setting limits on technology and also, how to gain confidence in one's own abilities to gain independence. I plan to buy this for my library.
Was this review helpful?
I'm not sure what to make of this book. I really liked the bright colors in the illustrations in the forest and out on Babbit's adventure. And I understand we all as a society spend too much time on our phones, but it makes me sad that we need to tell stories that remind kids to put down their devices.
Was this review helpful?
The phones decide to go on strike because they have been overworked and overused. Babbit decides to take good care of his phone Joan and put her to nap and recharge. While she is resting Babbit goes on a walk and is able to discover things that he normally does not notice when he has his phone. At first he feels lonely without Joan as company but makes new friends along the way that help each other to where they need to be. When Babbit find his way home he talks with Joan and they discuss how important it is for them to have breaks from each other so that Joan can rest and so that Babbit can explore the world around him.

I think this is a very creative and cute way to teach children that electronics are to be used in moderation. By giving the phone its own personality children can see how a phone/electronic might need a rest or some time off. They also can see all the things that can be experienced and seen without electronics.

I also really loved the illustrations in this book. very colorful and loved the richness of the texture.
Was this review helpful?
I received an ARC through NetGalley. I'm often a sucker for a story about a rabbit. This one is a bit preachy in getting the point across about overuse of phones--- but, hey---I'm guilty! It's a bit hard to believe that Babbit would have never seen all the things he noticed when he left his phone behind, but that's the point. Of course, a cell phone doesn't really have to go on strike, it's battery can give out. The pictures are very vibrant, a definite plus. I was a bit concerned that the bear might eat Babbit, but we didn't have to worry about that!
Was this review helpful?
Babbit & Joan is such a colourful, detailed children's book. My son was immediately captivated by every page. The story is about Babbit the Rabbit and his phone, Joan. The mobile phones are going on strike. They're tired and want to be switched off. Joan works hard for Babbit all day, so Babbit gives Joan the Phone a day of rest and goes outside without her. Without his phone he explores the world and sees loads of cool things he wouldn't have seen before, like animals and plants. He makes some new friends who also don't have a phone, but they get lost! Instead of looking up the information on their phone, they have to work together and figure out how to get home again. What an adventure! Babbit and Joan agree to take some time apart now and then, with their new found appreciation of being apart.

I love the message, although I do wonder whether parents and children who are so absorbed in their phone that they really need to hear it, will be the ones to pick up a book and read to their children. Nonetheless this is a very charming way of imparting an important message about getting away from technology and enjoying the world around us. The simple language and bright illustrations will appeal to young children, but the message will be for older children and their parents. Hopefully this reaches the people it needs to reach!

Five stars for the illustrations, four stars for the story.

Thanks to NetGalley for providing me with an ARC.
Was this review helpful?
Denise Turu illustrates the benefits of setting technology and devices to the side and taking a moment to look up, see, and experience all that is around you.  Babbit and Joan, a Rabbit and a Phone would make a wonderful addition to any library.
Was this review helpful?
This sweet story reinforces the importance of unplugging from devices, experiencing the world in real time instead of virtually, and connecting with others.  When the phones go on strike, Babbit the Rabbit tucks his phone Joan into bed to recharge and decides to go outside to explore.  He meets a couple of friends who are sad that their phones are awol and they decide to make the best of a stressful, phone-free situation.  The illustrations are bright, fanciful and cheerful and celebrate the natural world.  It's sad that Babbit's neighbors don't seem to notice him or what is going on and that Babbit must go far afield to find new friends.  I hope that the audience of the book, children from ages 3-7, would  not have their own phones;  but it's a good message for their caregivers, too! 
 The book resolves the situation nicely.
Was this review helpful?
Cute story about a phone, Joan, going on strike and her owner, Babbit (who is a rabbit!) giving Joan a rest, and going out for a walk. Good reminder to put our phones down, give them a rest, and ourselves too! Plus when we put our phone down, we can notice and enjoy so much more around us, like beautiful singing, new friends, and stories. #DeniseTuru #BabbitandJoanaRabbitandaPhone #NetGalley
Was this review helpful?
As the story opens, Babbit the rabbit is looking out his window. He sees a disgruntled group of cell phones, tired of being overworked, on strike. Their unhappiness makes him think about his own phone, Joan. Seeing how exhausted she is from taking pictures and texting for him the whole day, every day, Babbit tucks her into bed and tells her to sleep well.

That afternoon, the rabbit goes aside alone for the first time. Deciding to go for a walk, he enters the forest. Babbit notices things he hasn’t seen before: a mother snail with her baby on her back, a beautiful plant, and ants carrying leaves ten times their size. As the rabbit continues on his way, he realizes that he is lost. How can Babbit find his way home without Joan to help him?

The theme of Denise Turu’s ingenious picture book is sure to resonate with young readers and listeners and the adults in their lives. The author’s vivid and colorful illustrations bring the story to life and beautifully capture its varying moods: from the striking cell phones, the deepening colors in the forest as night begins to fall, and the brightness of the moon and stars. Signs carried by the striking phones bearing messages like TURN US OFF! and WE WANT BREAKS! add a touch of humor even as they make a statement. The simple text makes the story one which beginning readers can read by themselves.  
   
The adventures of Babbit and the new friends he meets on the way become the material for stories they can share with others when they return home—showing the value face-to-face encounters with the people in our lives. (There is only caveat: the attachment Babbit feels for Joan might reinforce a child’s attachment to electronic devices. Parents and teachers may wish to focus on the protagonist’s friendships with real life characters.) 

A delightful way to encourage readers and listeners of all ages (even the grownups) to give the phones a break and discover the world. Babbit and Joan is ideal for story time and discussions on the use (and overuse) of electronic devices and the value of enjoying the wonders of real world and the people in our lives.
Was this review helpful?