Cover Image: The Egg

The Egg

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Member Reviews

The Egg is a lovely picture book for young children without text. 
The pictures are cute and might capture the imagination of some children. Mine really enjoy having a story so I had to make it up as we went, ask questions to them, point things out in the picture. For this kind of activity I usually prefer a more elaborate illustration style, where their is a lot of things to discover together. As it was the book is flicked through very rapidly.
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Great drawings so colorful and bright for my kids to use their imagination to tell their own story!  Thank you to NetGalley and Owlbright for a gifted copy.  This is my honest review.
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All kinds of delightful. So glad for the opportunity to read this digital galley, as I admit I’m not usually a fan of wordless books (I know, I know, travesty) and when I first saw the cover on edelweiss, I thought the illustrations were digital, not the astonishing cut paper they actually are. Because of the good reviews elsewhere, I’ve had The Egg in my maybe pile for months—reading it here rocketed that to the definitely pile 😊
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Although the book didn't download in or order in my Kindle, I got the gist of the tale and it was lovely! A bird loses it's egg during a storm, grieves, finds another egg and hatches a baby human! I love the illustrations, they appear to be paper cuttings and are beautiful. I love all the other birds with their assorted babies- piggy, fish in a bowl, a cat, other children... The message wonderful!
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One of the best things about this book is that it is wordless. Each time we read this book (My boys are 9 and 7) we created a different story based on the pictures. I know that sounds odd - but the kids got a kick out of it. My 9 year old, interpreted the pics differently then myself or my 7 year old. The back cover of this book states that "family comes in all shapes and sizes" Which was a great lesson for my children. While they are part of a blended family - it's important to know that their friends families may look different. 

We enjoyed this book. 

Thank you to the author and NetGalley for allowing me to read a copy of this book.
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If any book is truly all ages, it's a wordless picture book like this one. Valerio has done a masterful job of breaking down actions and moments into multiple illustrations so we can follow the story without having to speculate about transition moments. We can see essentially every action that the stork takes. We also get a clear idea of it's emotions, between body postures and facial expressions. It's fear, desperation, loss, and love are clearly portrayed.And given the simple illustration style, the details don't get lost in background noise. Quite lovely.
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This is one of those books that leaves you scratching your head. Not because it's difficult to understand... but because you're just not quite sure what to make of it.

In wordless paper collage, The Egg tells the story of a large bird who loses an egg during a storm. While searching, they find something that looks like their egg... but which actually turns out to be a swaddled baby. Undeterred, the bird raises the human baby as their own.

That's all weird enough, but in the final pages, we see all kinds of birds with their adopted children: a toucan with a rabbit (or maybe it's an aardvark); a flamingo with a little girl; a parrot with a pig; and, rather hilariously, a pelican with a goldfish (in a bowl). I'm not sure what the reader is supposed to take from this. Birds are kidnappers? The "families come in all shapes and sizes" message is almost obscured by the absurdity of the pairings.

No matter. This is probably one of those books that you'll either love or roll your eyes at. It does manage to tell the story clearly without any words at all, which I admire. And the cut-paper illustrations are fun to look at. Overall, this is a strange little book... but one that I'm sure has an audience somewhere.
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This wordless picture book is very sweet.  A crane has an egg,but a storm causes the egg to be lost.  The crane goes out seeking her egg and comes back with a very colorful one.  But it’s not a crane egg.  It’s a baby.  The baby is raised by the crane and has a grand time.  I read this book as a digital galley and that was not the greatest, but I love the art work and can not wait to see the real thing in print.
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Love the illustrations in this wordless picture book. I'm a sucker for found family and representation of all the diverse family units out there. Being wordless, this book leaves a lot of room for kids to tell the story and for it to become a conversation.
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This is a wordless picture book that allows imagination and conversation to flow.  The story opens with a beautiful crane sitting in her nest protecting her beloved egg.  She has a very happy look of contentment on her face.  A vicious act of nature arrives that  changes her world completely leaving her distraught with grief.  Her solitary egg is blown away.

The heartbroken crane searches everywhere for her precious egg but it cannot be found.  In her desperate search she stumbles upon another lonesome egg that is abandoned.  Although it's not hers she rescues it and tends to it like it is. 

What hatches is a great surprise to her and to the reader.   Whatever can it be?  Will she adopt it and they become a family unit regardless of their differences?  When they finally fledge together they encounter other birds transporting a diverse variety babies pointing out that families come in all sorts of shapes and sizes all held together by the strong bonds of love. 

The paper-cut illustrations are colourful, whimsical and full of emotions.  The wordless book gives opportunity for oral vocabulary building, contextual skills, and predictions.  I highly recommend it.
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This was a cute book with beautiful illustrations made of paper. Even though there were no words, the message about families coming in all shapes and sizes came through.
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I received an arc of this title from NetGalley for an honest review. I loved this book about how families are all different and come in various shapes and sizes. Excellent illustrations are a great addition too.
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The Egg was a beautiful wordless picture book about loving, caring families that don't always look exactly the same. Families come in all shapes and sizes. There are so many opportunities for learning and activities.
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The first thing that you (or a child) will notice is that this book contains not a single word of text.  The pictures tell the story and convey both what is happening and the emotions of the characters.


This is a tale about becoming a family and how a family may not always look as we expect.  The crane is caring for an egg; the bird is upset when the egg falls out of the nest...a spoiler (the egg survives).  Enjoy the surprise of seeing whohatches and the relationship that ensues.


I like that this book has no text.  Because of this a child and adult can tell the story and talk about it.


Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this title in exchange for an honest review.
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I could not follow the book at all.  It had a uniqueness in the way the illustrations were presented in the form of paper cut outs, but they were very busy and odd. Not a fan.
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The Egg is a wordless story about a crane and a child. They become an unusual, and beautiful family.

As an educator, this book would be great for helping students develop inference and prediction skills. The beautiful illustrations lend themselves to students using describing skills. The wordless story will help students improve their narrative skills by putting the story into their own words. 

Thank you to OwlKids and NetGalley for the ARC of this book to review.
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As a teacher, The Egg is a wordless story making it an opportunity to build on a reader's contextual skills and prediction and conferencing abilities.   This lends itself to describing, inventing, and creating as each page is turned.  For the youngest reader, the story tells itself in expressive faces that convey emotion without a single line of text.  The story pushes the outside edge of believability, but in a way that is charming rather than outlandish.  Young children will be delighted by what hatches out of this egg!

Thank you to NetGalley for the opportunity to read this digital ARC in return for a fair and honest review.
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The Egg had all of the potential for this to be fun but unfortunately I review with our daughters on our Kindles so this wasn’t possible! Bummed! 

Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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'The Egg' is a beautiful children’s picture book about loving families that don't look alike. I would recommend the hard copy of this book to appreciate the unique illustrations. Overall, this was a nice book, but I didn't love it. I would recommend this book for younger children about 2-4 years old.  

Thanks to NetGalley and OwlKids Books for providing a copy of this ARC.
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