Cover Image: No Reading Allowed

No Reading Allowed

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Member Reviews

No Reading Allowed pairs hilarious artwork with the dual-wield of language. Teachers will love this book that shows the use of homophones and how they can change the meaning of what we write and say! My favorite part is that this book uses words designed to build and grow a vocabulary, promoting communication and language skill in our young readers!
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No Reading Allowed, by the authors of P is for Pterodactyl, is a fun book about homophones - words that sound alike but don't mean the same thing. There were a few reaches for some of the words/phrases, but all in all it was enjoyable and silly.

I would definitely use this with grade school kids, along with classics like A Chocolate Moose for Dinner, to get them thinking outside the box about language. It might also be fun to incorporate art by using some of the homophones as a prompt and seeing what people came up with.

My thanks to Sourcebooks and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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Thanks to NetGalley and SOURCEBOOKS for the chance to read this book! My sons and I had a lot of laughs while reading this brain-twister puzzle of a story. Humorous illustrations and clever wordplay! Well done!
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A fun picture book exploring the ridiculousness that can come from homonyms.Another cute book from Raj Halder.
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From the author of P is for Pterodactyl comes a funny book on homophones! This book reminds me of the Eats, Shoots, and Leaves book about punctuation because the format is to show two different sentences that sound identical but are spelled with different homophones. Each sentence comes with a silly photo and then there is a handy glossary in the back for words you may not knoe. I learned a few words (and some that I had been mispronouncing)! Kids and (fun) adults can enjoy this one!
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This follow-up is just as great as its predecessor, P is for Pterodactyl. Kids will crack up and parents will be just as amused at the wordplay.
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I thought this book was a lot of fun!  I think it illustrates homonyms very well, and I can't wait for schools to open back up to share this book with school-age kids.  I love the type of book that drives kids crazy!
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Another fantastic picture book! This was a fun book to read aloud and sound out the sentences to see if you could hear the differences! I really enjoyed this and can't wait to read it for a story time to some older kids in the future.
Thank you to netgalley and the publishers for providing me with an arc for an honest review!  :)
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I received an electronic ARC from Sourcebook Kids through NetGalley.
Haldar and Carpenter take readers on a journey through the English language. They compare pairs of sentences and show how words can sound the same but have distinctly different meanings. Love the Glossary at the end.
Plenty of humor as readers read the sentences and see the illustrations. 
Have to agree - this would definitely fall in a worst read-aloud category but the fun you could have doing so.
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No Reading Allowed: The Worst Read Aloud Book Ever           This is now one of my FAVORITE books ever for teaching how much fun language can be and why context is so important when homophones are used.  For example,  If I tell you there is a hair/hare in my soup what do I mean?  It is for that reason that this book and its pictures will be savored and poured  over by children and adults alike.  Each time I read through this 48 page book I noticed something new that had me laughing all over again.  Homophones are pictured in context in two very different pictures and sentences.  
      I would highly recommend this book to teachers wanting to teach the use of homophones and to parents wanting to laugh alongside of their children as they add new words and understandings to their vocabulary.  

    It is recommended for ages 4 - 8/grades 1-2.   I believe children of all ages will be able to appreciate it, although those younger than 4 may not understand the word play.
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This was a very creative way to introduce homonyms. The pictures do an excellent job to explain the meaning of the words. Great discussions could be had to help children determine the meaning of the words.
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""They" (bold, in all caps)" --the line at which I squealed in delight.

Thank you for letting me review this DELIGHTFUL picture book that plays with all the weirdness of the English language.  Perfect for kids and adults the like, this is one that I will not get sick of reading with my second grader. The illustrations are darling and as a grammar nerd, I found the whole thing to be so charming.  An absolute pick.
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Anyone who has read P is for Pterodactyl will know what to expect from this book, ie, another delightful picture book that plays around with the utter ridiculousness of the English language.  The illustrations are adorable and work well to highlight the playful text.  I imagine that this book will be a lot of fun to read aloud with a small child, and will help to start some great conversations about spelling and language.
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Thank you Netgalley and publisher for an e-ARC in exchange for an honest review

I loved this book! As a fourth grade teacher, this is definitely one that I can see myself using while we are reviewing homophones and discussing author's craft. This book definitely gives it a great little twist with some added humor to play on word meanings. The illustrations are so fun and help get the sentence meaning across. 

I cannot wait to add this to our classroom library and share this with my students in the fall!
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I received an ARC through NetGalley from Sourcebooks. Every two sentences are presented with the same pronunciation to introduce vocab to young readers with obvious attention paid to famous homonyms and other sound-a-like words. My son is a huge nerd and even he was a little perplexed by some of the some of the sentence constructions. Very nice illustrations that help illustrate the sentences. Overall, it’s cute, but just like “P is for Pterodactyl” I think it can go over some kids heads a bit. Best for ages 6+.
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It's fun.  I like that ways in which it exposes kids to new vocabulary through humorous ambiguous sentences.   I think teachers will enjoy sharing these with kids, maybe a little more than kids will choose it for rereading.
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If you read and loved P is for Pterodactyl then add this to your TBR.  This book is full of examples that illustrate how words and combinations of words can mean two different things, like a loud, and aloud. Just like before the illustrations are fun and help get the point across.  
#BBRC
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This book is delightful and playful. The way it plays with the English language is phenomenal, and the pictures are fantastic by aiding with any possible unclear context.
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What a way to introduce how confusing the English language is! (Honestly, how are we ever able to communicate?) Silly homonym filled sentences are accompanied by illustrations that help demonstrate the dual meanings of the words. A fun and informative read.
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What a fun book of word play! These colorful and often hilarious illustrations are going to be ingenious tools to help teach children the meaning of the words on the page, and how words can come together to mean different things - even while sounding exactly the same. The glossary at the back of the book is helpful to both children and adult readers.
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