Cover Image: No Reading Allowed

No Reading Allowed

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date:

Member Reviews

What a fun book! Anytime we poke at language I enjoy it. My toddler enjoyed time reading this to him.
Was this review helpful?
This book is fun, with so much wordplay and a fair amount of dorkiness going on! The authors of P Is for Pterodactyl bring readers more fun with the English language, this time focusing on homophones and homonyms, with some punctuation thrown in. The illustrations are quirky, with lots of detail and color, and they really help express the text. An engaging, sneakily educational read.
Was this review helpful?
I loved it! Another winning title for this dynamic duo! I can't wait to booktalk it when we begin to visit our schools again!
Was this review helpful?
If you enjoyed P is for Pterodactyl, chances are you'll enjoy No Reading Allowed. Authors Haldar and Carpenter are back with another silly romp through the English language. Centered around homonyms, homophones, and punctuation, readers of all ages will once again get a kick out of the tricky wording and funny accompanying illustrations.
Was this review helpful?
'No Reading Allowed: The WORST Read-Aloud Book Ever' by Raj Haldar and Chris Carpenter with illustrations by Bryce Gladfelter is a book of puns based on similar sounding words.

Using two phrases that sound the same, but are kind of mostly ridiculous, the authors show how we have many words and phrases with similar meanings.  So, things like "They Bowled in All Caps" and "'They' (bold, in all caps" are illustrated with ludicrous pictures.  

It's a very punny book, made fun with the illustrations.  The statements go from straight to outrageous.  What a weird language English can be.

I received a review copy of this ebook from Sourcebooks Kids and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.
Was this review helpful?
This is a punny book, some are funny, some naff & some stretching a little.

Overall a clever, witty short book.
Was this review helpful?
I love a book that shows us how absurd the English language can be.  
This is a book of homophones. Homophones being pairs of words that sound the same, but have very different meanings and different spellings.  
This book relies heavily on the illustrations for the humour, because the nature of a homophone is that each sentence will sound the same, it’s the spelling of the word that will change the meaning.  So reading this book out loud, without showing the illustrations might actually make it the ‘worst read-aloud’ book ever, as it states on the cover.  It does however, make a great book for sharing and discussion, and an excellent choice to liven up an English lesson in the classroom.
This book is American, so for readers in Australia there may be some additional explanation of the words to ‘get’ the humour, as we pronounce some words differently, or we don’t use some of the words featured in the book. 
For example:
We saw the queen’s burrow thanks to our ant hill.
We saw the Queensboro, thanks to our Aunt Hill   
We don’t pronounce Aunt as Ant in Australia, so the sentences won’t sound the same.
Similarly, 
The pitcher held the batter –We don’t use the word pitcher, here we call it a jug, and baseball is not a commonly played sport.
That’s nothing against the book.  I don’t think those ‘Americanisms’ will take away from the enjoyment of the book at all, and it gives parents/educators additional discussion points in regard to the English language.  Even though Americans and Australians speak English, there are still plenty of differences.
There is also a glossary at the back of the book, so if the reader is in any doubt as to the meaning of a word, they will find the answer there (although ‘pitcher’ is not on that list)
Was this review helpful?
This was such a fun book to look at! It would make a great gift. The writing is clever and the illustrations are bright and cheerful. If you enjoyed P is for Pterodactyl, you will enjoy this book. Thanks, netgalley, for this arc.
Was this review helpful?
This was fun!  I like this series and how it is showing how different aspects of language can be interesting, sometimes silly, and thought provoking.  Part of this were a bit over my daughters head (she is almost 4), but this was a great way to introduce these concepts and definitely got her thinking and asking questions.
Was this review helpful?
I love this series of books! They are so clever and my kiddos really enjoy reading them! It's educational while fun at the same time. Even I have learned a lot from them!!
Was this review helpful?
This book would be good to add to a ELA teaching library. It would be great for a lesson on homographs and homophones. Children would also enjoy the play on words and the pictures all by itself.
Was this review helpful?
What a delightful book! This book is full of the most imaginative homophones I have ever seen. It's so fun and even hilarious at times. It's a must-have for English teachers everywhere!
Was this review helpful?
No Reading Allowed was a cute and clever little book.  It was very difficult to read in the Kindle app, but I was able to get the gist of it!
Was this review helpful?
This is such a fun book! We were fans of Raj Halder’s first book and heard him speak at a Literature Breakfast in the winter last year before COVID hit. He was phenomenal and made us super excited about this book! I definitely recommend it to any educator or mom out there to read to their class/kiddos! 🙌🙌
Was this review helpful?
What a fun book! This will appeal to elementary school aged kids. Great book for a classroom, a school library, homeschoolers and kids (and caregivers) who love word-play. Fun illustrations and clever word-play.
Was this review helpful?
Such a fun book for word nerds and language lovers! 
As a homeschool mom, I'm thrilled to add this to my library for 1st-3rd grade, although my older kids (and I!) enjoy it as well.
Was this review helpful?
"No Reading Allowed" by Raj Haldar and Chris Carpenter is a book filled with homonyms and other words that sound alike to create pairs of sentences that although they sound alike, mean something completely different. This book highlights how strange the English language can be and will have readers critically thinking while enjoying some amazing illustrations. As an adult, I loved this book but I'm not sure what level of reader this book is best suited for. The content is sure to skip right over the heads of younger readers, but perhaps older kids will be able to fully appreciate the work. I do feel somewhat perplexed by the intended audience, but as an adult... I thought it was a cute and fun read. It is definitely not a book to read aloud as the title suggests! 

Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
Was this review helpful?
No Reading Allowed pairs hilarious artwork with the dual-wield of language. Teachers will love this book that shows the use of homophones and how they can change the meaning of what we write and say! My favorite part is that this book uses words designed to build and grow a vocabulary, promoting communication and language skill in our young readers!
Was this review helpful?
No Reading Allowed, by the authors of P is for Pterodactyl, is a fun book about homophones - words that sound alike but don't mean the same thing. There were a few reaches for some of the words/phrases, but all in all it was enjoyable and silly.

I would definitely use this with grade school kids, along with classics like A Chocolate Moose for Dinner, to get them thinking outside the box about language. It might also be fun to incorporate art by using some of the homophones as a prompt and seeing what people came up with.

My thanks to Sourcebooks and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
Was this review helpful?
Thanks to NetGalley and SOURCEBOOKS for the chance to read this book! My sons and I had a lot of laughs while reading this brain-twister puzzle of a story. Humorous illustrations and clever wordplay! Well done!
Was this review helpful?