Cover Image: In Case You Get Hit by a Bus

In Case You Get Hit by a Bus

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Member Reviews

One of the authors of the book “In Case You Get Hit by a Bus: How to Organize Your Life Now for When You’re Not Around Later” by Abby Schneiderman, Adam Seifer, and Gene Newman, had a brother who died unexpectedly in a car accident.  His family was heartbroken at the loss, but also very much in the dark as to how to respect his wishes,and,how to carry on some of the routine family tasks that he had done.  And this was on top of dealing with his estate which is a big job as anyone who has lived through dealing with an estate knows.  Two of the authors of this book are associated with Everplans, a digital life planning company.

Here is a description of the book by the publisher:

“A step-by-step program for getting your life in order, so you’re prepared for the unexpected.
 
The odds of getting hit by a bus are 495,000 to 1. But the odds that you’re going to die some day? Exactly. 
 
Even the most disorganized among us can take control of our on- and off-line details so our loved ones won’t have to scramble later. The experts at Everplans, a leading company in digital life planning, make it possible in this essential and easy-to-follow book. Breaking the task down into three levels, from the most urgent (like granting access to passwords), to the technical (creating a manual for the systems in your home), to the nostalgic (assembling a living memory), this clear, step-by-step program not only removes the anxiety and stress from getting your life in order, it’s actually liberating. And deeply satisfying, knowing that you’re leaving the best parting gift imaginable.”

For those of you that are ultra organized Type A personality types here is a more detailed breakdown of the included sections of the book:
LEVEL 1
 ❑ Organize Passwords & Codes
 ❑ Compile all the Money You Have
 ❑ Create a Home Operating System
 ❑ Organize Contacts
 LEVEL 2
 ❑ Get Your Legal Docs Done
 ❑ Look into Creating a Trust
 ❑ Write a Letter of Last Instructions
 ❑ Compile all the Money You Owe
 ❑ Get a Handle on All Your Insurance
 ❑ Construct Your Personal Medical Journal
 ❑ Create Your Advance Directive
 ❑ Make a Digital Estate Plan
 ❑ Name a Digital Executor
 LEVEL 3 
 ❑ Gather up All Your Physical Memories
 ❑ Fill Out an Ethical Will
 ❑ Write Blurbs and Letters /Make Videos for Loved Ones
 ❑ Pre-Plan Your Funeral
 ❑ Write Your Own Obituary

What I liked about this book is that the projects are divided into sections that can be tackled in reasonable amounts of time one at a time, and you can prioritize only those sections that apply to your situation.  After my parents died and I dealt with the paperwork that ensued from that, I vowed to organize my husband and I’s affairs and to fill out and leave paperwork that would make this task easier for my family someday when they were in the same shoes.  I thought of many of the things in this book—but not all of them.  

This is a topic that many people do not wish to confront, but they should for the sake of their loved ones.  One recommendation that I would make is to buy this book in print format.  Then you could write notes in the book for your loved ones, and keep track of what you have done and not done.  I received the Advanced Reader’s Copy of the manuscript in an e-format that was full of useful information, but was also full of some formatting and editing errors (which were probably removed before the book was officially published) which hindered how easy it was to read.  From reviews written by purchasers of the published print version this does not seem to be the case.

Thank you Workman Publishing and NetGalley for the Advanced Reader’s Copy of this book and for allowing me to review it.  (Publication date 22 December 2020)
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No one wants to think about dying but it will come.  Death won't care if you are ready or not.  Accidents happen and you can have things prepared for your family and loved ones by reading this book.  The authors have lived the experience of navigating funeral arrangements and moving forward when a loved one died without any provisions for the future. This is a easy to follow guide to making life go smoothly for the ones you leave behind.  Great advice and full of options many do not think about.  I received a copy of this ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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A useful resource for every adult.  It isn't pleasant to think about being "hit by a bus" but it sure was helpful to know what needs to be done and to have a guide and helpful hints.  I think all together this book is a lot, but a chapter at a time is manageable.  I would love to do a book group with this at our library for those of us wanting to get things in order before the bus arrives.
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Sadly, the ebook file was not formatted well for Kindle so I cannot give an honest opinion of. From what I've read online, it offers excellent resources and my library did order it for our catalog. I am hoping to read the actual print copy.
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<em>It's (really) your funeral...</em>

You know, after finishing Abby Schneiderman and Adam Seifer's <em>In Case You Get Hit By a Bus</em>, I realized something. There's a reason why all of this stuff is usually handled by professionals. As monumentally beneficial it is to be aware of all this information, it is <em>extremely</em> overwhelming. Quite frankly, the first chapter alone, on <em>passwords</em>, of all things, was a huge undertaking.

<b>Death is Stressful</b>

I really don't think there's any other way to put it. Even before you're dead, your death is <em>stressful</em>. This is probably why a lot of people put off thinking about it. And honestly, I'm only a few years shy of 30. By all accounts, I shouldn't really <em>need</em> to think about this for a long time now. But, when it comes down to it, accidents happen.

And, much to my personal dismay, there is a lot involved with figuring out what comes next after a person dies. I'm honestly annoyed as hell about the finances involved. Frankly, I think it should be simple and not require family members to pay anything; but then, I'm honestly of the mind that graveyards are a waste of space and the only reasonable use of a body after death is donation to science. So, I recognize that I'm probably in the minority here. That said, the conclusion I've come to is that death is a stressful and, unfortunately, expensive time for a lot of people.

And, theoretically, this book is supposed to make it easier. 

<b>My Experience</b>

For me, this book was overwhelming. I moved from one topic to the next reading this in perhaps the worst way possible: like I'd read a novel.

Let's just say, the way to get through this book isn't to just read through it. You're gonna want to pause periodically every couple of pages or chapters to go back, reread, and work through the topics. And I'll be honest, I didn't really feel like doing that when I read this book. As it is, when I sat down to simply compile all my passwords together I just about started screaming in frustration. And yeah, this is probably a sign that I should do what the book says and get a password manager.

Regardless, as I said before, there's a reason you get other people involved in setting up all this after-death planning stuff. There's simply so much involved that you can't get through it without some stress and help from others. Which, brings me to the entire purpose of this book: promoting their website.

<b>Everplans</b>

So, the authors of this book also run a website called Everplans. This website basically breaks down sections of the book into a format that allows you to input all of this information in one place for the people you leave behind to have easy access. You go through organized lists of the very concepts in this book. I'll say this much, the website is <em>much</em> less overwhelming. The problem? It costs $75 a year. And part of me very seriously wonders if that's worth the price.

In the end, I'm left feeling overwhelmed, disappointed that the easier option requires a subscription fee, and not at all ready to tackle my death plan. But, admittedly, part of that is influenced by my own inability to find time for other important things in my life. Adding this on right now would just be incredibly difficult.

Ultimately, I think the book is a decent one. And it's certainly something that you'll have to tackle in pieces. And you'll probably want to do it with a partner. But, I dunno...next time, I think I'd want a book with pages I can fill out the information into rather than relying on the companion website that I don't want to pay for. 

<em>I was provided a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.</em>
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This is a winner! As the adult in my house that handles all of the paperwork and bills, I cannot wait to dive into the processes that the authors lay out for passing things on to someone else. This is going to be my big summer project. Everything is organized very clearly and step by step to help the reader "just do it" which I appreciate. I could see this being a great gift as well!
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The book is divided into sections and gently eases you into the various things that will help you in the event you can’t speak for yourself or will assist your loved ones (or those who get stuck with cleaning up your affairs) after you’re gone. There are some anecdotes included to help make the points more relatable and bring it home that this is something people need to think about and then go do. Beyond the usual Wills and putting sticky notes on objects to go to certain people, we now have a digital world that must be dealt with. Some things will end when you do but others, with monthly auto payments, need to be stopped in order to avoid unnecessary draining of your bank account. Then there’s the stuff on your computer that you don’t want others to see. Yeah, porn stashes are listed as major embarrassments next of kin sometimes discover on a deceased’s computer. You also want someone who is absolutely discreet to clean out your home.  

Closing down social media accounts, cancelling credit cards, and Ebay or Amazon accounts helps prevent identity theft and unauthorized shopping sprees. And don’t forget unused gift cards or all that online media you’ve bought and which retailers consider that you’ve only “rented” for your lifetime. Oh, and you might want to consider the photos you’re storing in the Cloud, with Amazon, or other online storage sites. 

The book doesn’t deal with any end-of-life medical issues or hospice – just getting everything neat and tidy so someone could step in and act for you if, for whatever reason, you can’t. They do mention their company which can help with all this but also give lots of other choices – many free or low cost – which can do the same things.   

Takeaways from the book? Passwords, passwords, passwords and the authentications needed to access accounts. Any wishes you have or legal forms that you’ve filled out – LET PEOPLE KNOW ABOUT THEM. Carefully choose the people you wish to act for you and again – let them know you’ve done this and talk with them to see if they’ll do what you want. At a time when your nearest and dearest are grieving or grappling with your medical issues, having all your medical, legal, and financial ducks in a row will take some of the burden off. B
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Excellent and timely resource that I found to be beneficial.  This will be a good addition to our rural library collection.
My thanks to Workman Publishing and NetGalley for the chance to preview the ARC.
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IN CASE YOU GET HIT BY A BUS by Abby Schneiderman, Adam Seifer, and Gene Newman provides "A Plan to Organize Your Life Now for When You're Not Around Later."  It is actually a great idea, especially as the New Year approaches and with many of us looking for productive ways to spend time during the pandemic. The authors begin with a section on why planning for a sad, but inevitable event is so important. First, they cover "stuff" – those passwords, money and securities, and your home. Next, they focus on assembling the pieces (wills, trusts, power of attorney) and debt as well as medical insurance and checkups. The third section is much more fun – compiling memories or photos to be able to share the story of your life. The authors acknowledge from their own experiences that these tasks can be overwhelming and therefore provide helpful "plans of attack." They stress that this work is not really about death; "it's about life because getting everything organized lets you live to the fullest."

The Wall Street Journal, of course, offers frequent articles about digital options for financial planning and often refers to Everplans, the company that Schneiderman and Seifer co-founded. For a bit of perspective, here is an older (2014) interview with co-author Abby Schneiderman:  [Embedded video] 

Overall, a useful tool although the preview Kindle version I used had several formatting errors. I would like to see this in print, too. 

Embedded video from this link:
https://www.wsj.com/video/managing-your-estate-there-an-app-for-that/A02F911A-9806-481C-97F6-EFDC2E69EE81.html 
Other links in post:
https://www.wsj.com/articles/estate-planning-goes-digital-as-many-families-explore-options-11585128602 
https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-to-prepare-your-financial-information-for-when-you-die-11601697960
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An excellent handbook clearly setting out how to make preparations for your own untimely death, in the tragic event of being hit by a bus, or modern equivalent: Covid19 
As a child, being hit by a bus was a common phrase in my house and we all knew that we were living day by day. Now with gadgets, encrypted passwords and online banking and various online accounts, it is imperative that our near and dear, can access our accounts and documents in case of sudden bereavement. It falls to us all to be mindful of this, and to simplify access if necessary and make preparations to relieve the stresses involved in sorting financial affairs in the midst of grief. 
A great, thorough and clearly set out handbook. 
Thanks to #NetGalley for the opportunity to read this ahead of publication in exchange for an honest review
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Not at all what I was hoping.  Wanted s more how to - this was just generalized things I would hope people know!
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In Case You Get Hit By a Bus is described as a  “step-by-step program for getting your life in order, so you’re prepared for the unexpected.” Written by the people responsible for Everplans, a company that specializes in “digital life planning,” it includes three general areas. The first is “urgent,” and is excellent at itemizing the truly essential things that someone will need right after you get hit by that bus: things like passwords. They have specific recommendations, including several password managers (including Dashlane, which I use and love). The second general area is the “technical,” which extensively outlines how to create a manual for the systems in your home (who should be called if the A/C stops working?). It is exhaustive and incredibly useful. The third area is nostalgic, including things like how to assemble a living memoir, write your own obituary, etc .  
 
The odds of getting hit by a bus are 495,000 to 1, but the odds that you are going to die? Yes! Everyone needs to do some planning, I would expect. Not too long ago, my husband and I were involved in untangling the affairs  of his parents and my aunt following their passing. Fortunately, all had wills, which helped a LOT. My aunt had planned everything so that things went very smoothly. But we realized the amount of STUFF that needs to be handled as part of this process, and since we have no children, we thought “who is going to have to take care of everything after we are gone?” We spent a lot of time creating a trust, etc etc etc. I actually thought we had things fairly well covered. But reading this book made me realize we still have a lot to take care of. 

The idea is that if you follow the guidelines this book, you will end up with a system for managing passwords and secret codes, your money and assets (including bills and debts) will be organized, you will understand medical directives,  wills, powers of attorney, and trusts, and you will at least have THOUGHT about what to do with photos, recipes, and family heirlooms. It isn’t something that is easy to talk about or deal with, but if you have been through it after someone passes, you know what a help this kind of planning can be. Yes, they are trying to sell subscriptions to Everplans, but it definitely isn’t required, and any steps you can take as a result of reading this will help whoever after you are gone. Five stars
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This book had good, practical information. I don’t like to think about some of these things, but with the events of 2020, I’ve been thinking about them more often. I liked how the authors went beyond the usual end of life decisions (such as funeral planning and medical care) and talked about topics such as passwords and digital management. I’ll be sure to share this information with my family and friends.

Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC, in exchange for an honest review.
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I picked up this book because one of my favorite sayings is, "what if I get his by a bus?" I mean things need to be in order so someone can pick up where I've left things if I was to be no more. My boss has forbidden me saying this any more, but then this book came out and I couldn't resist.

This is a great book about being prepared when you or people you love die. I think we all know there are certain things we should have when that time comes, like a will, for instance. After that, I was somewhat in the dark. Thank goodness for the common sense spelled out perfectly in this book.

I like the tone of the book. It is a difficult subject, but one we all need to talk about. The author writes with humor and authority, making this very accessible. There are also tests in the chapters to see how prepared you are (and to make you realize how very UNprepared you may be).

In the first chapter, the reader is given 10 minutes to locate important documents: social security card, driver's license, marriage/divorce paperwork, birth certificate, etc. It may be eye-opening to realize the things you don't have ready access to. Another chapter shines light on the importance of someone you trust having access to your passwords since we keep so much of our lives somewhere in the ether.

Really good, really accessible, easy to understand - I couldn't ask for a better way to start a difficult conversation.

My thanks to Workman Publishing and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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I didn't get through the whole title, but this is one I may have to buy for my personal collection. It's so important to plan ahead, but I kept not wanting to read it for that same reason.
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I have to say, I am truly amazed at all the things I would have overlooked had I not read this book.  I have already gone through the sudden deaths of loved ones and the chaos that ensues - and now I wonder all that I had missed in terms of putting things in order as well as how much easier things would have been had things been taken care of beforehand.  This book is sympathetically written, easy  to follow, has great action plans and checklists, and a wealth of information on this very hard subject.

The book is broken down into three major topics: Start with your stuff (passwords, people, money, and your home); Assemble the pieces (trusts, wills, health care, and your digital matrix); Finishing touches (memorabilia, letters, funeral planning, and obituaries).

There were so many good topics in here: e.g., how best to store/save passwords so that your phone, ipad, computer, etc., can be accessed/used and don't need to be thrown away.  But there are other considerations such as diaries and saved letters - do you really want your family to read those private love letters you wrote to someone in the past? Of course, it covers the usual needed items such as wills, writing your own obituary, and ensuring that children understand how you would like items distributed.

Death is probably one of the hardest subjects to discuss with family but if you don't, you could leave them in a very bad situation of having to do so much work to put your affairs in order while also grieving your loss.  This book is a one-stop shop that is nicely presented, has great checklists and action lists to keep you focused on the topic, and a very friendly and encouraging tone that makes it so much easier.  Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.
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This is the book that no one wants to read or deal with until they absolutely have to; but when you have to, you should be prepared, and not overwhelmed. This book is the guide or tool to help you accomplish all the tasks almost painlessly. Plus, it does not have to be done all in a few days, you can take a week or even a month to gather all the required information. 

This book is readable, well-organized, provides all the important topics, and even checklists! Who does not love a checklist, they are fool proof? The unchecked little box just glares at you until you get it done!
Abby Schneiderman and Adam Seifer are the cofounders and co-CEOs of Everplans.com, that help people of all ages organize their lives and legacy now— so that their loved ones will not have to have to later. Everything is clearly designed and easy-to-follow, to help even the most disorganized reader take control of modern life’s burgeoning mess of on- and off-line details. (paraphrasing mine)

Here is a Summary of the Checklist of Main Topics:
LEVEL 1
 ❑ Organize Passwords & Codes
 ❑ Compile all the Money You Have
 ❑ Create a Home Operating System
 ❑ Organize Contacts
 LEVEL 2
 ❑ Get Your Legal Docs Done
 ❑ Look into Creating a Trust
 ❑ Write a Letter of Last Instructions
 ❑ Compile all the Money You Owe
 ❑ Get a Handle on All Your Insurance
 ❑ Construct Your Personal Medical Journal
 ❑ Create Your Advance Directive
 ❑ Make a Digital Estate Plan
 ❑ Name a Digital Executor
 LEVEL 3 
 ❑ Gather up All Your Physical Memories
 ❑ Fill Out an Ethical Will
 ❑ Write Blurbs and Letters /Make Videos for Loved Ones
 ❑ Pre-Plan Your Funeral
 ❑ Write Your Own Obituary

If you have known anyone who has faced this unfortunate situation suddenly, then you know how important it is to be prepared with all this information. I include myself in this process as well. I highly recommend this book.


Thank you to Netgalley, and Workman Publishing
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Thank you NetGalley, for this ARC in exchange for review. 

When I requested this book to preview, I had no idea a friend of ours would die soon after. We are heartbroken for his family, but his wife told me he was very organized and she knew exactly where to find everything she needed. My husband and I got to thinking...that is not us.

In Case You Get Hit By a Bus is timely for many reasons. All of us think we have all the time in the world to get to the end of life planning. If there is anything we've learned in 2020, the end of life came for over 300,000 Americans because of an uncontrolled virus (so far/December). We ALL have to be cautious of what we are leaving behind. Gone are the days of putting everything in one folder. Our digital footprint is everywhere - that needs monitoring after we are gone. 

The best part about this book isn't even the guidance, its the humor. If I can laugh out loud at a book about my own demise, the authors are onto something. Written by the founders of Everplans, this may read as a commercial for their website. But who cares? I need the info and I need someone to explain it to me. This fit the bill. 

Recommended for those 18 and up...anyone who needs someone to look after things when they are gone.
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Since I was unable to read the book due to a multitude of formatting errors, I will not be reviewing this book. Although I suspect the book would earn a higher star rating had I been able to read it, I can't justify giving it more than one star at this point.
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Thank you to the authors, Workman Publishing and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

This book is a comprehensive and clearly structured guide for working through all the questions most of us are eager to put off for "someday". However, it goes far beyond the usual advice on wills, trusts, living wills etc. It includes extremely useful information and tips on managing your digital presence, tips for reducing your material possessions to lighten the load on your heirs, guidance for leaving effective departing words and planning your funeral (should you be so inclined), and ways to and encourage and support your loved ones in their planning.

Two things I had issues with: the formatting - why o why the difficult to read two-column style? - and the fact that the checklists would be better placed at the front of the book. In addition, I found it very USA-centric , albeit still very helpful for those of us in other countries.
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