Cover Image: Planet of Science

Planet of Science

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Member Reviews

I make no secret of my fondness for profiles of interesting and under-sung people, especially scientists. This one is a bit of a mixed bag, both in subjects and in presentation. We have a fair number of familiar figures here. You know: Archimedes, da Vinci, Einstein, Darwin. Those sorts. So yes, we've heard about these people before. But since the stated aim was to highlight people who made life changing discoveries it would be strange to exclude them. And Fischetti makes it a point to set the record straight when it comes to what we've been told about them. Newton and the apple. The "eureka" moment. Even Pythagoras and the theorem. So I learned a lot from even these brief profiles. I could have done without the comics, though, since they are more about puns and gags than adding any clarification to the profiles.
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I like the illustrations and text meant obviously for younger readers. I think this could be a primer for a young person interested in science, especially around those ages when kids start dreaming up what they’d like to do when they get older.
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I think this book has great appeal for age 8 upward. The cartoons definitely add to the appeal for this audience. Interesting information on people as far back as the Ancient Greeks and what they’ve done for society. Nicely done.
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Thanks to Netgalley for a digital copy in exchange for an honest review :) 

This book has a great premise: presenting scientists in an accessible and funny way. The descriptions were easy to understand and informative. It also has one page for each scientist that presents an event from his/her life in a funny way through comics. Some of the comics were interesting, but they were not my type of funny content unfortunately. 

I believe that the title is a little to generous for the book. It claims to be "The Universal Encyclopedia of Scientists" but it presents just 37 scientists and most of them are Europeans ones, which did not make me very excited. I expected more diversity.
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Planet of Science.
I got this book today itself, as I was done with my stuff for the day. I opted for this book as yesterday itself I have read a wonderful graphical novel which was the biography of Charlie Chapline from the same publisher. It is a good book for children only.

The book is an encyclopedia of about 37 revolutionary scientists from around the time and world. To be mentioned few of the very old names are Pythagoras, Thales and the well known like Darwin, Einstein, and Da Vinci. There also some who are not much talked about. The book narrates about the basic information about the scientist and there work so as to introduce them to the kids. The graphical party of the book is good for the kids, and it is good to go with the kids only.

Thanks to Netgalley and Europe Comics for the book.
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This was a big surprise for me – a book from Europe Comics I would not really declare a comic.  And certainly I might not wish it was a comic.  We look at 37 great minds of history, from Thales and Pythagoras through Einstein and beyond, with the help of nice, readable, succinct little biographies, that tell us just what we might want to know.  The comic bit comes from one trivial detail of the biography being blown up cartoonishly, and extrapolated on to try and get a yuck out of it.  Inevitably they fail; they're not visually appealing, they're not humorous or particularly surprising, and all they serve to do is to brighten up the spreads in this worthwhile primer for science history students.  The written content is fine – worth exploring and keeping.  But every second page, with its full-sized scrawl, is just off-putting junk.
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The combination of comic strip, prose, and content knowledge is inviting in this book. A wonderful resource for the classroom or home library.
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