Cover Image: Dusk, Night, Dawn

Dusk, Night, Dawn

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Member Reviews

Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC of this title. If you know Anne Lamott, you love Anne Lamott. Even though her life experience is vastly different from my own, I found so much I could relate to in her stories. She blends humor and profound wisdom so effortlessly. I think there is something for everyone in these stories.
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I really wanted to love this book and went in with high hopes because I am in desperate need of a guide to "restore hope and joy in our lives." Unfortunately, this one did not work for me and I ended up skimming the majority of it. I plan to come back to it in hopes that maybe this is a case of "reading at the wrong time", but for now this one is a miss.
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Anne Lamott does it again. Dusk, Night, Dawn is a beautiful meditation on life. Her reflections on the pandemic were particularly relevant. Long time fans of Lamott will enjoy this newest book.
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This title is absolutely everything. I want to be Anne when I grow up. I'm sure she'd have a pithy comeback for that comment, but to be able to articulate her thoughts and ideas in a way that is stripped down yet sincere is just masterful. I'm not in the "third third" of my life yet, but I'm getting there and hoping to learn from the wisdom she shares. And Neal. I love Neal. I love Neal and Anne. I love how Neal loves Anne and how Anne loves Neal and how she so perfectly describes marriage . This is a must read for anyone of any age. I've already sent out mass recommendations!
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I discovered Anne Lamott's "Operating Instructions" as a new mom over 25 years ago, and I believe I have read most or all of her books since. This is my favorite of her recent collections of essays. While our lives and experiences of faith differ greatly, her sensibility and humor is very much in line with my own, and it has been a pleasure to read about her path and evolution over the years, especially now in this "third third" of life (and as a newlywed to boot). I look forward to continuing to follow her on her journey, and thank NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC of this book.
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Anne Lamott’s newest collection of essays was written during the early days of the pandemic, and her wise vulnerable words that lovingly confront the fear and anxiety of our current age seems especially appropriate and well timed. Her stark questions and hilarious turns of phrase (like comparing an agonizing family conversation to reading Wikipedia’s entry on PMS) disarms the listener to probe more deeply into the soul’s layers underneath the seemingly endless reasons for anxiety. Lamott, who always narrates her own audiobooks, is known for saying that “laughter is a bubbly, effervescent form of holiness”, but her witticisms don’t come cheap or without cost. Her meditations on her late father and mother’s influence are her most grace-filled, thoughtful and wise words she’s written yet. Her voice gets rougher as she shares how she separates the trauma they left her, while also holding onto the good she still clings to. Her distinct, slightly raspy voice is more grandmotherly, enlightened, and wry as ever as she attempts to remind the young generation of protesters that her generation still has something left to offer--they know all the protest songs, after all. This newest collection of essays is the perfect antidote to the constant doom scrolling of social media. Recommended for lovers of memoirs, essay collections, and spiritual wisdom seekers.
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Lamott’s twelfth non-fiction book deals with the connection between personal anxieties and social concerns like climate change. With her quiet humor, she talks about how salvation will be grassroots efforts and becoming more mindful and intentional by focusing on personal growth, we have taken the first step to helping society. Lamott’s many fans will not come away disappointed. Lamott continues to help us focus on our own spirituality to improve the world.
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A friend messaged me the other day, telling me Anne Lamott's newest book is coming out soon. We both agreed we needed her words now. NetGalley read my mind - thank you for the ARC in exchange for review. And I truly mean it. Thank you.

Anne Lamott's words are always a salve, but after the last four years in this country, I wasn't even sure her words could touch my inner wounds. I was wrong. Mostly because my inner wounds are nothing compared to what so many are going through. But really, because Lamott has this gift of knowing my soul, and the souls of my friends, and the souls of strangers...which leads me to believe we are all more alike than different. 

Fans know Lamott is still a newlywed at 60ish. She spends a good deal of the book talking about imperfections, what love is, and what it isn't. I'm guilty of looking for perfection in love. I'm also constantly disappointed. I do have the love Lamott describes and I just needed her words to remind me.

In addition to her new marriage, she opens up about her childhood and her alcoholism. In those chapters I found a forgiveness for my own parents and an appreciation for those struggling with addiction. 

But the most personal part of the book came at the very end. Here, Lamott talks about a retreat she attended. As she was talking, it reminded me of a "life changing/mountain top" retreat experience I had 20 years ago. A week that changed my life. I fondly compared my week to what she was describing. As I ended the book, I kept reading, looking at the acknowledgements - which I don't usually do. This time, I saw a name I will never forget. She thanked Mark Yaconelli, the retreat leader of my life changing experience 20 years ago.

What are the odds? I'm not sure. But a good friend told me we needed this book. NetGalley offered it immediately. Lamott's words entered my inner being. And I was reminded of a spiritual guide who helped shaped my life. Dusk, Night, Dawn is fate.
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It's been awhile since I have read Anne Lamott, and this book reminded me why I like her.  There is much we disagree on, but I can't help loving her very real approach to faith.  And, as I think about getting older, I also appreciate her down-to-earth, serious yet lighthearted descriptions about moving into this next stage of life. If you haven't read Lamott, I recommend starting with one of her earlier books.  If you are already a fan, you'll enjoy this.
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I am usually a huge fan of Anne Lamott’s writing. That is not the case with this book. It just feels random and disjointed. Maybe because she wrote it during the time of Covid when most of our brains are feeling random and disjointed, and hers is feeling that way as well. Looking forward to her next right in the post Covid world! Thanks to NetGalley for a complimentary copy of the book in exchange for my honest review.
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I will read anything my girl Annie writes, but few compare to her early religious memoirs "Traveling Mercies" and "Plan B". However, this one felt fresh and relevant and JUST what I needed to read as a coup was attempted at our nation's capitol. Lamott's words bring me comfort, but they also weave together ideas and wisdom in a totally fresh way. I finished this and immediately started it again, and I rarely re-read books.
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Anne Lamott has done it again and again and again, offering solace with wit and grace and bravery, too. Love this book. Everyone should have a whole shelf of Lamott's books.
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Much of Dusk Night Dawn: On Revival and Courage by Anne Lamott sounds like what readers have heard from her in previous books. Something new is Anne got married! She talks about her new husband and married life. Now she has someone with whom she can share her insecurities.

Lamott talks much about contemporary issues in this volume: the pandemic, politics, and taking care of the earth followed by thoughts on redemption and forgiveness. Her sense of humor is infused throughout each chapter.

As usual, I have no idea what Lamott is talking about in places – the governess? --  while in other parts, she makes great sense of the confusing world. 

Fans of Lamott’s might find this to be a lightweight contender in her body of work but will read it anyway. First time readers would be better off with Bird by Bird, my personal favorite.

Anne Lamott, writer of both novels and nonfiction, uses her life experiences in her books, including alcoholism, single motherhood, and spiritual experiences. 

My review will be posted on Goodreads starting January 1, 2021. 

I would like to thank the Penguin Group Riverhead and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in return for an objective opinion.
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Really Anne can do no wrong in my book. I thoroughly enjoy her wit and wisdom, and her unique view of the world. This was a quick, delightful and important read.
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