Cover Image: Hack Your Kitchen

Hack Your Kitchen

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Member Reviews

Such a fun book. This one is filled with great kitchen experiments that kids will find a lot of fun. Some of these are even edible like a recipe for rock candy. Great suggestion for Christmas or Library shelves. Librarians in charge of makerspace programs should take notice of this book.
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#HackYourKitchen #NetGalley

Special thanks to NetGalley and Lerner publishing group for providing me with ARC.

I loved this book so much, science and cooking is perfect combination in the kitchen theses days, it made cooking so easy and save a lot of time that we need.
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Science and food, what could be better. Kids, with adult supervision, create edible science projects. Photographs of diverse families walk you through each step. The science is explained clearly, the instructions are clear, the end results look appealing. This is a must-have for all libraries.
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Simple and engaging food experiments for elementary-aged scientists! This colorful book does a great job of walking kids through the steps of the experiment, explaining the science behind it, and reminding them to be safe and responsible in the kitchen. A great way to encourage STEAM activity with everyday items, and all activities I want to try myself!
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Fun science experiments in the kitchen! I will definitely be using this book for my programs, and with my children.
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This book is from the Science Buddies organisation that provides science resources for parents and teachers. With just 10 experiments, it's not entirely clear what age group this is aimed at and certainly some of the experiments require adult supervision. It's a shame to see one experiment using bendable straws which are being phased out. It will be fun to try out some of the experiments - a blue erupting volcano from a lemon for example!
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The title had me thinking this children's book would be about cooking, but it's really just science activities that mostly require on things you can find in your kitchen. There are 8 experiments and they're simple to do -- make a volcano with a lemon and baking soda, make craters by dropping objects in flour, make edible paper with rice flour (one of my favorites), make a really long straw by connecting plastic straws, make colorful "walking water" with paper towels, make a slushy by shaking juice with frozen salt water, make baked ice cream (baked Alaska) and make rock candy. Each one is well illustrated with colorful images that easily show the steps. Each one also tells the science behind the results, which I appreciate. In all, it's a fun and well illustrated book that's easy to replicate, though I wish there were more experiments.

I read a temporary digital ARC of this book for review.
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Let's begin with the things I liked about this book. None of the experiments were overly complicated; the pictures and instructions were very clear, and I felt like the intended age group would be able to clearly understand them. There were a couple of experiments, like the lemon volcano, that would be great for STEM programs at the library. Now for what I didn't care as much for, the book is very short. I know it's a children's book but still, there are only 8 experiments and some of them, like the edible paper, require ingredients that most people are not going to have lying around the house (brown rice flour). I would still recommend the book to a patron who was looking for easy science experiments but I would probably feel the need to find them something else to go along with it.
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This is a very short book, there is only 8 experiments to do with your kids in it. The experiments are good, particularly the volcano and edible paper one, this last one I had never seen. They are very well presented with great picture-by-picture presentation. You really want to do them with the kids, they are very easy to manage, clear to understand and children are excited about the whole process, There is a little paragraph about what science each experiment teaches, which is nice, but I would have liked a little more on that. 
While what is there is very high quality, the book still feels a little lacking, I think it could have done with more experiments.
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Well illustrated little book of science fun in the kitchen. Eight projects are well explained and illustrated. Great ideas for young kids. Wish there were more activities.
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This is a fun kids science book to do in the kitchen. The pages are very colorful, full of photos and it looks very fun for the little ones. There are only 8 projects and it's a small book with only about 30 pages but you could do one project a day. I received a free digital copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review
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This book was a fun guide to different experiments to try at home. This book has lots fun things to try and I can't wait to do them. I also have never done a lemon volcano which seems wild!

THank you to netgalley and the publishers for providing me with and arc for an honest review.
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This is a cute little science book! It's short--only about 30 pages with 8 experiments, but I think that helps to keep it really manageable. The photos are clear and colorful and the instructions are easy to follow--even for this less-than-science-minded adult, I will have no trouble guiding my children. Really looking forward to adding these experiments into our home/remote learning in the coming weeks!

Thank you to NetGalley, Lerner Publications and Niki Ahrens for making this copy available for review.
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