Cover Image: Marvel's Black Panther: Sins of the King

Marvel's Black Panther: Sins of the King

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Member Reviews

Clearly meant as an avengers script, this has all the elements for a great movie, but it's not a great book. Too much rehashing of old themes and with Graviton as the enemy, a little out there.  But it's still fun to see how these movies start.
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As a huge Black Panther fan, it kills me to my core to say that I could not finish this book. I'd love to highlight that the problem wasn't in the format or writing style at all. The plot just didn't catch my attention enough to push myself and still give it a try. Cuz' I tried, whenever I picked it up I'd start reading and dropping it a few pages later. 
I wanna still thank the author and publisher for their kindness in sending me a copy. I'll sure recommend it to my friends. Thanks and sorry again that it wasn't for me.
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After the death of Chadwick Boseman, this was a bittersweet read b/c as I was reading this, his portrayel of T'Challa was what I pictured. My heart though...
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Marvel's Black Panther: Sins of the King fires on all cylinders. It's a very well-written story that will have both fans of the character and newcomers enjoying all things T'Challa and Wakanda. I would encourage everyone to check out the audiobook from Serial Box. It is extremely well-voiced and adds another layer of greatness to an already great script.
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It starts off slow and kind of dense, but once the action begins, it's hard to resist the story as it drives forward. It reads as a true epic, one that makes you feel the world really has been reshaped as you read it. Would recommend.
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Exactly what I wanted, and now I want to pick up the audiobook! Black Panther fans should definitely check this one out.
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I received this e-book ARC from Netgalley of a SerialBox audiobook. But I thought it was a graphic novel. I'd rather read my superheroes in graphic novel form than book form. This story was okay. I'm not huge into Black Panther and the formatting on the e-book was just garbage so it was difficult to get through. I'm not sure where it falls in the Marvel timeline because it seemed both before and after. A little confusing. It definitely would've been better in audio form, as it was originally intended. I may listen to the other ones in this series.
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It's not unusual for me to step outside romance to review mystery or humor, but this was the first time reviewing a comic book story. It's very important to not get stuck in rut, no matter how warm and comfortable.
I am so glad I did! This was such a compelling story. I really feel like I need to go back and read more and then come back and keep reading whatever else comes next. I discovered Black Panther like most of the public (through the movies), so this was a great way to learn more about these characters.

Finding a great story regardless of genre is like finding treasure, so I am glad I gave this a try!
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Marvel's Black Panther: Sins of the King
by Ira Madison III (Lead), Steven Barnes, Tananarive Due, Mohale Mashigo, Geoffrey Thorne
T'Challa is haunted by his own mistakes, the consequences of being a super hero. You may have powers you may help people but there is a cost. Sometimes a tragic cost. His fathers return, causes him to fight with his own supporters. But finding the truth of his return may be the darkest secret of his guilt.
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Black Panther is a king of a small country called Wakanda.  His name is T’Challa.  The resources of his country are now available to a neighboring country Rudyarda.  However due to the past, there is difficulties that must be resolved.  Can that happen?  King T’Challa wishes he had help in deciding what to do.  His council doesn’t help him.  When he goes to try to get in touch with his deceased father through a ritual, his father appears in his physical body. King T’Challa can’t believe it.  He is happy yet concerned that this has happened.  What does this mean for Wakanda and for himself?  Suddenly Rudyarda is attacking Wakanda.  Why?    Will the two countries resolve their difficulties?

This is a well written story that reflects political problems, personal problems and family.  I did originally think this was a graphic novel.  It’s not.  However it is well written.  I found it fascinating how the “Black Panther” dwelt with his personal and political problems.  It’s an excellent story to read.
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The edition that I’m reviewing includes episodes one through thirteen, covering an entire story arc that revolves around a present-day conflict with its origins in the policies of Wakanda’s previous king, T’Chaka – hence, the subtitle. I mention this because the single “issue” / episode-only books seem to be what are currently posted on Amazon and GoodReads (though the blurbs they display are consistent with the story under review.) While I try to avoid being too spoiler-y, it’s hard to talk about a thirteen-issue collection without spoiling something about the first issue. 

The story opens in media res with a fight against Graviton that takes place in Rudyarda, one of Wakanda’s neighboring countries. This battle includes not only Black Panther and other Wakandan warriors, but also a partial Avenger’s roster including Vision, War Machine (Col. Rhodes,) Ant-man, and The Wasp. This Avenger’s team will be “re-assembled” in the climactic battle – against another foe entirely. However, the heart of the story revolves around T’Challa / Black Panther (and also Shuri and Okoye (of the Dora Milaje)) operating more or less independently. The Graviton opening is mostly about getting off to an exciting start, but the most compelling parts of the story occur later when the characters are more isolated and vulnerable.

After the Graviton battle, there’s a bit of intrigue in New York that lets the reader know there’s more going on than meets the eye. However, the big shocker of the book comes upon T’Challa’s return to Wakanda when he finds his deceased father (T’Chaka) is inexplicably back from the grave. The strength of this story comes in the middle issues (Ep. 6 – 9) when the Black Panther is isolated from his resources and must rely on his mind and his capacity to endure adversity. While the Black Panther is away from Wakanda, the nation comes under a kind of Trojan horse attack, requiring others to hold the fort while T’Challa extracts himself and brings reinforcements. 

There is a false climax in Ep. 11, in which it seems that the forces of good have won – only for the battle to be taken to an unexpected domain. I would say the conclusion of the Ep. 11 battle was the least satisfying part of the story; the pacing and explanation gave it a deus ex machina feel. However, the fact that the ultimate battle was more satisfactorily concluded made the Ep. 11 victory less problematic. 

I found this story to be compelling and cleverly plotted. It keeps the reader engaged and – for the most part – satisfied. If you get a chance to read it, I’d highly recommend it.
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I quite enjoyed this read. Like the other Serial Box titles it’s thin on style and heavy on finding ways to stretch the story. But all that works. It’s a rapidly moving tale that pulls heavily from all corners of Marvel.
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This was a really well made Black Panther story. I enjoyed it as someone who is fairly new to the fandom, and I'd imagine others would as well whether they're new fans or old.
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I was a bit disappointed by this story. I thought it was going to be a comic book and instead it was just pages upon pages of dialogue. The story was interesting enough, but I was looking forward to an actual comic book so it kind of killed the interest for me.
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I feel like a dope for admitting how confusing I find the marketing/formatting of this product. It's an audiobook, but I read it, and you can only get text samples from the website at the time of writing? Oh, wait, depending on what link you use, you can access both the text as well as audio narration by Chidi, I mean, William Jackson Harper (but honestly, I can see Chidi standing at a whiteboard, animatedly reading this out loud to me before offering me Peeps chili, lol.)

Anyway, I read this in its entirety and sampled the first chapter as audio. As far as Marvel novelizations go, it's decent, with the edge probably going to the audiobook version (and I'm generally not good at listening to books, so this is pretty high praise from me.) King T'Challa of Wakanda a.k.a the Black Panther is pensive on the anniversary of his father's death, wondering whether he's doing his best in maintaining T'Chaka's legacy, especially in the face of constant criticism from his still-isolationist council. When the Avengers call, letting him know that the villainous Graviton is heading to the neighboring country of (siiiigh) Rudyarda to steal secret technology, T'Challa leaps at the chance not only to do something heroic but also to prove to his council the worth of improving foreign relations, especially with a neighboring nation they share a contentious relationship with.

Post-apartheid Rudyarda is appropriately thankful for the help, even though casualties are high and destruction of infrastructure even worse. But when T'Challa later attends a benefit to help rebuild the city of (siiiiiigh) Kiplingaard, he's assailed by an assassin whose subsequent death is captured on social media, labeling Black Panther a killer. Heading back to Wakanda under a cloud, he's stunned by the sudden, mystifying appearance of perhaps the last person he'd expected to see: his very own father, whose secrets may go a long way to explaining recent mysterious events.

So the absolute ridiculousness of a Dutch colony naming itself after perhaps the most English colonial writer of all time aside -- especially when the book later goes on to state that the founders were fleeing South Africa, which would definitively make the English their mortal enemies -- this was a pretty good look at African politics, and how countries world-wide distort history in order to make themselves look like the good guys. It brings in a delightful number of supporting characters and villains, and tho I thought the crush T'Challa had on Misty Knight felt a little bit forced, honestly who could resist Misty Knight? I did think it was a little weird that Ant-Man was still Hank Pym, but I haven't read the comics in years so I guess he's back? Or this is just in a random timeline of its own, who knows. 

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As a Black Panther story, it's quite entertaining, and the sound effects of the audiobook are pretty great. I couldn't help thinking that this would have been better served as a traditional comic book tho. The action is both predominant and yet not detailed enough: the text felt like it needed more to bring it to life, whether it was the cool effects of the audiobook or gorgeously rendered panel illustrations. Overall, a worthy package that discusses the costs of isolationism -- and a definite must-have for Black Panther fans -- but not essential reading otherwise.

Marvel's Black Panther: Sins Of The King by Ira Madison III, Geoffrey Thorne, Tananarive Due, Mohale Mashigo & Steven Barnes is a Serial Box exclusive and may be purchased <a href="https://www.serialbox.com/serials/black-panther?season=1">here</a> as audiobook with bonus ebook.
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I kind of expected a comic book or graphic novel here, but what I received reads like a comic book but without pictures. So, just reading what was in front of me, the story is exciting, and when I read along with daughter #2, who loves comic books and graphic novels, she felt the same way. She knows more about the Black Panther world than I do, but what information I gleaned from watching the movie gave me enough to grasp the story here. I think anyone who likes Black Panther will probably enjoy this book. As I said, the story is exciting and full of action. It's creative and intriguing, and fans of the genre should be all over this one.
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Black Panther: Sins of the King by Ira Madison III et. al. is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in mid-December.

These stories from individual authors are sort of connected and they tell of T'Challa balancing between diplomacy and heroically defending Wakanda, while struggling with mysterious dizzy/cloudy spells. Meanwhile, evil swarms around a nearby kingdom, drawing T'Chaka from the afterlife to assist. And, yay, Misty Knight!
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This is a awesome book on the Black Panther and Wakanda and how T'Challa has moved his area forward and can now help those around him protect their land and people.  But when T'Challa decides to help a neighboring area that is moving away from oppressing their people many don't understand and that is when the trouble starts.

This is a wonderful book and also includes some the Avengers in the action.  But the mystery will really hold you and not let you go until you finish the book and figure out everything behind what is going on.  The part I am not going to ruin for you.  Have fun and enjoy the book.

This review will appear on my blog on Jan 28th.
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An excellent medium for this story of the Black Panther.  The story is intelligent and well thought out to fit the manga style.  The target group loved this volume and asked for more.  I read it myself then had a group of 13-16 yr olds read it.  All gave 5 stars to the story and the illustrations.
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T’Challa strives to be a good and worthy King of Wakanda, as well as a global citizen, Avenger, and brother. He does his best to do this in spite of traditionalists pushing back at home, and his instincts are put to the test when the undead rise and overtake Wakanda. He then relies on his late father for help in restoring the country.

If you thought this was a comic book, nope. This is a full-fledged novel, and it’s a fascinating look inside T’Challa’s head. He struggles so hard to be a good man, a good king, and do the right thing by the neighboring country his father had shunned a generation ago. But his father is now back from the dead, Misty Knight is present as an investigator, and someone seems dead set on destroying the budding alliance between Wakanda and Rudyarda. When this is revealed, I was at once surprised and not surprised. This Big Bad pops up a lot in the Marvel Universe and often works toward global domination, which Wakanda is standing in the way of.

T'Challa relies on his family and friends and understanding others' motivations and the history behind it is critical for his successes. Even in the midst of apparent defeat, when it seems like he's at the lowest he could possibly be, he thinks critically and continues to take a proactive approach. Despairing moments make him think, and that's truly his superpower, not the benefits of the heart-shaped herb that confers the powers of the Black Panther. I really like that about him, as well as the conflicted drive to do right by everyone. It's a difficult path to walk, but he makes it work, and this is such a good message for everyone at this time.
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