Cover Image: Sacred Earth, Sacred Soul

Sacred Earth, Sacred Soul

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Member Reviews

When I first heard about this book, I was looking for an overview of celtic mysticism. This book goes super in-depth to the background and theology of the culture. This book is just more academic than I wanted, but if you are looking for that sort of thing, this might be the book for you.
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This would be an excellent book for church history fans or even for seminary course on church history. The content is rich, chronicling the history of natural-based spirituality from early times up until the twentieth century. The book is beautifully and thoroughly researched and presented in a highly readable format. There are reflection questions and prayers at the end of each chapter. Highly recommended for adult formation courses and for those interested in the rich background of nature-based Christianity.
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This book was absolutely wonderful in many ways. I have always been curious about Celtic Christianity and this book gives a pretty great overview of how the Irish/Scottish Christians connected with both the Sacred Spirit of God and also appreciated the sacredness of the Earth and all that lives on it. It's a book I have referred to at least 100 times since I've read it and keep telling my friends that once it comes out it is a MUST read. I was honored to read it before print, and I honestly can't wait to have a physical copy in my hands!
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This book is a companion for learning, living, and embracing Celtic spirituality. It’s a spirituality firmly grounded in nature, in which God is found within everything and humanity is simply part of creation (rather than lord over it).  The teachings are filled with community, connection and love.  In each chapter, Newell shares the life and teachings of nine historical Celtic leaders. These include Pelagius, St Brigid of Kildare, John Muir, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin and Kenneth White.  His goal is to equip the reader “with the teachings and practices of past Celtic leaders so we can listen for the sacred and reverence it within us and all around us today.”  Each chapter ends with a meditation based on the message presented. This provides a nine-day cycle of meditative awareness. Celtic spirituality is both ancient and modern. Its connection to life leads to action for environmental and justice causes. For many today who struggle with religious dogma, these teachings will resonate deeply.  It is a book to be read slowly and often.
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John Philip Newell’s “Sacred Earth, Sacred Soul” is a sacred gem that guides us into the depths of sacredness through the exquisite lens of Celtic Christianity. You cannot help but feel deeply grounded and inwardly inspired when reading these pages dripping with profound reflections that call us into the sheer beauty, wonder, and interrelatedness of all things. Such a deeply moving read!
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As a Christian with strong Scottish, Irish and English heritage I was interested in this book.  It gives an historical review of a number of people who were important in the Celtic stream of Christian thought and practice.  This includes such diverse people as the heretic, Pelaguis, the Irish Saint Brigid of Kildare, and the naturalist John Muir.  It was very enlightening to me to learn about each of the persons included in the book, their thoughts and influences.  The theologian Alexander John Scott, included in one chapter, influenced a number of the greatest literary figures of his day such as Dickens, Thackeray, and Chopin.  
Celtic Christianity is an important theme in Christianity as it calls to reverence and steward well all created things, not just people.  I encourage anyone interested in Celtic history or Christian history and thought to read this book.  
I received a complementary copy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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An interesting premise, mainly a history lesson on Celtic and early Christianity. Wasn’t sure what to expect with this one, but a little too bogged down in data for my taste. If you are interested in the history of the change in religion than this book would be a good read.
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I read this book one chapter at a time as I felt a need to absorb the subtle and hopeful thoughts and prayers. The celtic world is well known to me. I was still in awe of the new information and teachings gleemed from Mr Newell's book. The chapters contain celtic figures that have a point to make about the sanctity of our earth. It is a very peaceful book and I found myself wandering more often on the nearby trail thinking about the natural world and its beauty. Hopeful and prayerful. This book is a delight!
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His book was written really well but it just wasn’t for me unfortunately..............................................
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The book “Sacred Earth, Sacred Soul” by John Phillip Newell was simply outstanding !  If were asked to teach a class on Celtic spirituality, my text would be this one!

The outstanding qualities of this book arewas extremely well developed with dates, places, folktales and poems. Additionally, it has a rare clarity and simplicity.

As for content, it embraces Celtic Mystery, the Celtic Saints, and Walking the Celtic Path. 

For me, as someone who focused Celtic Spirituality in graduate school and much of this book was a good refresher. Nevertheless, I learned something new in every chapter. The connection between the desert fathers/ mothers and Celtic Christianity was enriching.

The glaring weaknesses were the end of chapter exercises.   I would have appreciated more direction in the meditations. Also the collection of the same exercises in the rear of the book was redundent.  

It is a great book that I highly recommend. 

I just reviewed Sacred Earth, Sacred Soul by John Philip Newell. #SacredEarthSacredSoul #NetGalley
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I did not realize this book will lean heavy on Christianity and God. The indescribable names and context took away from the wisdom that could have been presented here. The book should go back into development and take a different approach.
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