Cover Image: We Are Not Like Them

We Are Not Like Them

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Member Reviews

This is not a perfect book but it is a needed book. The conversations it can lead to and the thoughts it can provoke are worth the read in itself. It is also an interesting story with great characters. Definitely recommend.
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One of the perfect things about this timely story is it’s imperfect heroines. Joined at the hip from an early age, each have supported and been allowed to grow to womanhood . Each has chosen paths that reflect the drive begun in youth. Each now faces the moment welded long ago to rise to the person they as adults need to be. It is rich in character but long on philosophy. A racial divide in this country speaks to a shift long overdue. A moment when justice moves beyond the word to the actions of the courts and the daily practice of our leaders. The writers have illustrated in these two characters the struggle of history human and its desire to do the right thing.
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Thought provoking, emotional, and relevant. This story tackles tough topics of racial injustice and brutality. It's also an examination of friendship, lots of food for thought and discussion fueling subject matter.  A great pick for GMA Book Club.
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We absorb many beliefs as we grow up. Many of us go through life never having to question these ideas.  These two women came face to face with them.  How would I deal with such circumstances?  I don't know. Do read this book, share it and talk about it.
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I actually liked this book. I was initially intrigued by the idea of having co authors in this topic. I have seen some negative feedback about how the topic was handled and while I do agree with some of those ideas I think overall it was a very good book.
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We Are Not Like Them, by Christine Pride and Jo Piazza, is a thought provoking story of friendship, motherhood, race, and justice. I really enjoyed this book and recommend it for book clubs and book discussions. This book is sure to be a conversation starter. Thank you to NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for providing this book in exchange for my honest review.
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Powerful. Important. Heartbreaking. This book should be read by everyone. It changed me, and I will never think the same.
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A fantastic read that confronts issues of race, police brutality, and friendship head on. This collaboration between a Black author and a white author makes for a very realistic portrayal of tough conversations that more people in our country should be having today. Such an important book. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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If WE ARE NOT LIKE THEM isn’t the perfect book club selection, then I don’t know what is. @goodmorningamerica chose this as their October pick and I can see why!

The story centers around lifelong friends Jen and Riley. Jen is a white woman married to a police officer, and Riley is a Black woman seeking to climb the career ladder as a television journalist. The limits of their friendship are tested when Jen’s husband is involved in the shooting of an unarmed Black child. 

Make no mistake, this is a powerful story about race in America, but it is also a story about navigating friendships through new seasons of life. The novel is written in collaboration by a white woman, Jo Piazza. and Black woman, Christine Pride, which brings authenticity to the story.

There is a lot to unpack that merits thoughtful discussion. The authors have graciously offered to match up diverse buddy reads for small groups to facilitate conversations that might not otherwise take place. How incredible!

RATING: 4/5 

A big thank you to Simon Audio and Atria books for the audiobook and electronic ARC in exchange for an honest review. The full cast audio narration takes this production to the next level.
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This book is great! Would definitely recommend. Thanks so much to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC.
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This is such a powerful story.  It is written by two real life friends from two different point of views.  It touches a number of very relevant topics in such a raw, emotional way.  Certain parts of this book made me self reflect in ways I wasn’t expecting.  Were parts of this book uncomfortable to read?  Absolutely.  Do these uncomfortable conversations need to happen?  Absolutely.
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We Are Not Like Them offers alternating perspectives between two close friends after a life altering event. 

This book confronts real life issues, but at times felt like it didn’t go deep enough into those issues. The first half was a little slow, but the second half flew by, leading me to want to see what happened next. At times the friendship between Jen and Riley seems to not exist at all. Overall, it was a compelling book that made you think and reflect.
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Great timely story. I didn’t love how it ended as it felt nothing much was learned by either party but great writing and overall an amazing theme.
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This was such a great read. I can honestly say I didn't think I was going to like it as much. With all the racial tension in the world and all the killing of innocents - it was like will I be able to handle this. It was easy to fell for each woman's plight - and while I at times couldn't stand Jen's behavior or thoughts sometimes I was happy to see Riley put her in her place. I definitely think this was timely and will be a beneficial look for allies and others alike.
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Smart. Moving. Two women, two voices, both struggling to see if their friendship can survive- if there can be any common ground between a black woman and the wife of a white police officer following a tragic shooting that ignites a racial firestorm. When you realize that there can be no truth without acknowledging the truly different experiences between Black people and Whites, no matter the length of history, love, and shared experiences. This book gives two valuable perspectives- also highlighting one similar thread: the fear that the ones you love won’t make it home, a fear that is palpable whether who you live wields the power and privilege, or whether how you love is powerless. Highly recommend .
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Two women of different races find their friendship tested after the shooting of a young Black person. They face the issue of identity and how race plays a role in every-day life while trying to maintain the relationships that mean the most to them. Authors Christine Pride and Jo Piazza tackle a subject of relevance to today’s cultural climate with cursory treatment in the surface-level book We Are Not Like Them.

Riley Wilson has recently moved back to her hometown of Philadelphia after a short stint as a news reporter in Alabama. She thought the move to Alabama would be a boost to her career, a chance to move up to the next level. Instead, the microaggressions and racial inequity become too much. When a job offer for a better market comes her way, she doesn’t think twice about coming home.

The move is a step up both professionally and personally. As an up-and-coming reporter, she’s covering important stories and eyeing the anchor desk. Her personal idol and one of the few Black anchors in the local market currently sits in that seat, but word around the newsroom is that Candace will be retiring soon. Riley is doing everything she can to prove she deserves the spot.

Work keeps her busy, but she has her family right in town—her parents and her brother, Shaun, and her best friend, Jenny Murphy. Jen and Riley have been inseparable ever since they met as preschoolers. They’ve supported one another through everything, including Jen’s fertility issues and Riley’s recent messy breakup with her longtime boyfriend. 

Jen is equally thrilled to have her best friend home, although she can’t deny that the vibe between them is different now. Maybe it’s because she’s finally pregnant. Maybe it’s because Jen worries about her husband, Kevin, a cop for the Philadelphia PD. Now that the baby is coming, he’s picking up all the extra shifts he can to make more money. 

While pursuing a suspect, Kevin and his partner shoot a Black teenager. Within 24 hours, Riley and Jen find their lives blown apart. Riley’s boss puts her on the story as the lead reporter. Jen spends much of her time in limbo trying to support Kevin, which is hard when his ex-cop father and current officer brother keep trying to strong-arm him into responding a certain way.

Jen and Riley face issues of race they’ve never considered before, particularly when it comes to their friendship and how they relate to one another. As the women navigate their personal lives and the public aftermath of the shooting, they learn what lines they need to draw with one another and what lines they can cross.

Authors Christine Pride and Jo Piazza dial right into one of the most discussed topics of current times: police brutality and how it intersects with race. As marketing materials promise, the premise of the book feels familiar. Real-life news stories offer similar scenarios, albeit often with more depth and heft.

Although Pride and Piazza aim for a thoughtful, in-depth look at how the murder of a Black person by a police officer affects people, the result is a book that comes across as superficial at best. The book skips along the surface of the issues, touching on many different topics but not settling deep enough into one to pull readers into a heartfelt examination of anything.

Riley accuses Jen of not stopping to consider the Black experience without ever bothering to share what that experience actually is. In front of her husband and in-laws, Jen finds herself weakly defending all Black people with Riley as proxy as she’s questioning whether she even needs to do so. Several events in the book feel placed, as if meant more for the sake of an introduction to the Black experience instead of an eagle-eyed examination of how Black people suffer. Characters like Jen’s mother and Kevin’s partner feel more like placeholders.

Readers who want a quick read into a novel that mirrors current cultural clashes may like this one. Those looking for a more earnest book might want to try something else. I recommend readers Borrow We Are Not Like Them.
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I picked this up based on the concept: a black and a white writer teaming up to create this story together, both helping to write each perspective. I think I wanted a much deeper dive into the two besties really talking about race. All throughout the book Riley holds back on talking to Jen about it. Jen was pretty off putting as a friend. She never stuck up for Riley either. 

I think I expected to see more of the legal/court trials but they are completely skipped over. I was never sympathetic for Jen’s dude or felt that it was hard to pick a side. It’s Riley all the way for me. Either making the two sides way harder to pick could have elevated this book, or really really diving in on those racial discussions with friends and family could have made this story more heartfelt and insightful.

Special thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the eARC in exchange for an honest review.
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Jen and Riley have been best friends since they were young kids. Growing up Riley always noticed the difference in their race, but it was never a conversation they openly had. When Jen’s husband, a local cop, is involved in the shooting of an unarmed black teen, Riley, a tv journalist is put on the story. Will Jen and Riley’s friendship be able to survive this horrible situation? As a Black woman Riley has strong feelings about the way police treat her and others of her race, but knowing her best childhood friend is also hurting leads her to question if their friendship can truly handle this.

Do you ever go to take a picture of a book and think “I cannot take a picture that will be good enough for this book?” No? Just me? Ok well, that was the case with this book! I’m sure you have already seen me rave about this book on my stories, and I am here to tell you that you will see me rave a lot more because this was easily a 2021 favorite read! The ability for authors to write a story where you find yourself feeling empathy for the ”villain” is a true gift. You know he did wrong, you hate him, you want his life ruined for what he did, but there is that tiny part of you that feels for him. The way Pride and Piazza wrote about friendship was just absolutely mind blowing. I don’t even know how to write this review, but two authors, one Black, one White, writing a book together about race ended up being a truly beautiful thing. I also got to listen to both of them recently on a podcast and it was fascinating to listen to them talk about how writing this book together forced them to have conversations I wouldn’t have had otherwise, and I think that is such a beautiful thing. I could go on forever, but let me just tell you, you do not want to miss out on this amazing read. Do yourself a favor and order your copy now.
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LOVED LOVED LOVED. So well done - you really felt for each woman and this didn't feel super one-sided. A timely, necessary story that wasn't too preachy. I would definitely recommend. An easy 5 stars.
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A big thank you to @atriabooks for the gifted review copy.⁣
⁣
𝗪𝐄 𝐀𝐑𝐄 𝐍𝐎𝐓 𝐋𝐈𝐊𝐄 𝐓𝐇𝐄𝐌  had to be a difficult one to write and it’s definitely a weighty book to read. In it, co-authors Christine Pride and Jo Piazza tackle tender, fragile topics surrounding race and unconscious biases that need to be talked about much more, but that many want to shy away from. ⁣
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This is the story of best friends Jen and Riley who have known each other since preschool. Jen is white, Riley is Black. Jen spent much of her youth with Riley’s family because her own home life was unstable. Though adulthood took them in different directions, they always counted on their friendship as a touchstone to who they were. Everything about their lives looks different when Jen’s husband, a police officer, is involved in the shooting of a teenage Black boy. Jen’s world is turned upside-down, but so too is Riley’s. She’s dealing with her own feelings about yet another police shooting of a Black youth, while also reporting on the story for the television station where she works. ⁣
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From this set up, Pride and Piazza are able to generate many important conversations around race, particularly shining a light on white people who “don’t see color.” I appreciated the realities the story brought to light and that it was done in a story that was also compelling to read. I think the authors had to walk a delicate balance between hard lessons and delivering a story that many would want to read. I was engrossed from beginning to end, so obviously they did an excellent job. I initially felt the book should have gone deeper into the epidemic of police shootings and police reform, but honestly there is only so much one story can cover and in the end I think the authors truly got it just right. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️✨
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