Cover Image: Can You See Me?

Can You See Me?

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Member Reviews

*received for free from netgalley for honest review* Really like the artwork of this book and the idea of it, tho i do think the hard copy is better than the digital one lol
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This is a children's book that I read to my twin boys. I have to say I like the idea behind this book, and that this book makes kids think really about size of things. I have to say I was not a fan of the pictures and the front style the words was written in. I do not think the pictures pull kids into the book. I would have give this book 5 stars if I felt the pictures would pull the kids into the story. I think the storyline alone was so great. I was kindly provided an e-copy of this book by the publisher (Kids Can Press) or author (Gokce Irten) via NetGalley, so I can give honest review about how I feel about this book. I want to send a big Thank you to them for that.
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The world is a big and wonderful place but it can also be quite confusing. Why are elephants so big while ants are so tiny? Why do humans have two legs while spiders have eight legs and snakes have no legs? Gökçe İrten does a fantastic job of showing preschool-age children that our world is filled with a diverse array of creatures both big and small and that everything and everyone serves their own unique and special purpose. Can You See Me? is perfect for introducing young audiences to empathy- and perspective-building, and Gökçe İrten’s gorgeously rendered illustrations are sure to delight them as well. Can You See Me? is a book I’ll be eagerly recommending to parents, caregivers, and the children accompanying them.
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This title would be great to use as an introduction for a measurement in grades pre-k to even 5th grade. Art teachers would also benefit from using this book to teach perspective and proportions. Cute illustrations. I wonder if the pictures are to scale?
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This cute story would be great for children to spark the conversation about varying perspectives. The book compares things of different sizes and views them in different and new ways - an orangutan is small to a human but giant to a flea, a building is large to humans but small from an airplane’s point of view - working as a unique demonstration that things aren’t always what we see. The illustrations are wonderful and I think the book could be very helpful for kids to understand not only the world around them but give them a language about how they are feeling. Overall a fun and colorful story with a good message.

Special thanks to Netgalley for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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I really like the concept of this picture book. Different perspectives are key to introduce to children because not everybody will see the world the same way as you, physically and emotionally. I love the illustrations in this too, I think it comes across really clearly and is very clever.

I am unsure if the pdf I viewed was out of order, because some pages didn't quite link the way I thought they would.
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Well this is just the sweetest little book about perspective. I can see myself reading this to my toddler, to help her  develop empathy for people and things that are smaller than her (including her little sister)! A great little book!
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I loved loved loved this book! The introduction hooked me immediately -- 
"Some things around us are small and some things around us are big.  Buildings, planes, streets, and cities are big. Paper clips, daisies, pencil sharpeners, and teaspoons are small.  But are they really?"

This book can lead to great discussions on perspective and point of view. As a former kindergarten teacher, there are so many ways that I thought this could be used as a read aloud
- Math: discussion on big/small
- Science: comparing/contrasting scientific facts about the nature/world, researching some of the facts included in the book
- Writing: this could be a great writing prompt for students to write from a different perspective 

Thank you Netgalley and Kids Can Press for an advanced ebook.  This book will be published Sept. 7, 2021!
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This book is perfect for schools that follow the writer's workshop approach in school or for an art teacher to teach about perspective. The simple language and the appealing illustrations make this a good read!
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This is a cute book that explains how size (large vs small) is all a matter of perspective. It also gave some fun facts about some animals. I liked the style of illustration (looked like everything was made from ripped paper).
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This is a really unique picture book for young children exploring the complicated idea of perspective. It is very cleverly done through animals and insects that the children will be able to relate to. The text is written in a relaxed handwriting style and this makes it easier to access the information. There is so much great information contained in the book which will really get children ( and those reading to them) thinking about size. The text is carefully spaced out and the pictures dominate on the page which will capture the children's imagination. This is a book which will warrant lots of re-reading and will foster lots of talk and discussion. 

With thanks to the publishers and NetGalley for a very interesting and thought provoking read.
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This book was an okay book. The font made the story hard to read. It would work for a read aloud. Younger readers will struggle with the font.
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This is the first time i've read a book about perspectives. I really enjoyed the different comparisons and seeing things through another's point of view. I think this would be a great book for my next extended story time kit. Great book!
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It is easy to feel small in a world that is so big. But when perspectives shift, things that seem tiny in one circumstance can be enormous when examined a different way. A child’s room is filled with toys that represent much larger counterparts elsewhere on planet Earth. An orangutan, an airplane, and an Eiffel Tower reside with other items in a small basket, and they take on new relationships as they are compared to one another. For example, a flea on an itchy orangutan can appear to be walking in an orange forest when observed more closely. When feeling small, regarding the world from alternate angles can improve one’s outlook on life.

This picture book is written for young readers thanks to its limited use of language and ample white space. However, its message is universally accessible to readers of all ages. Hand-written text gives the book a playful quality, reading like a conversation with a friend more than a picture book. Speaking directly to the reader, this narrative uses a series of facts and comparisons to convince skeptics about the great skills the tiniest of creatures exhibit. By the end, readers who have ever felt small have a new perspective on their own experiences and how they perceive the world.

Collage-style illustrations blend with visible pencil lines and brush strokes to create nearly tactile images. Even though the pages are smooth to the touch, this design makes the story feel more immediate than traditional two-dimensional drawings would do. Focusing on the featured child’s bedroom, each image examines pieces of it from unexpected and unusual angles, emphasizing the overall message of the story. Using natural hues of blues, yellows, oranges, and grays, this book incorporates a palette that is memorable in its limited scope.

Readers of all ages will appreciate the supportive goal of this story that uses specific examples to remind readers that size is in the eye of the beholder. Translated into English, the narrative flows smoothly and easily, further demonstrating the universality of this idea. Through facts and figures and a dynamic visual presentation, this story is both enjoyable and helpful to young readers. This is a lovely addition to picture book collections for children.
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This was an interesting book that tries to explain size and perspective to young readers.  The illustration style was unique and incorporated many different art styles.
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In the book Can You See Me? we learn that size is just a matter of perspective.
I very much enjoyed reading this book with my 6 year old and we both loved the whimsical, colorful illustrations. 
The text, while it mostly makes for a good read-aloud, did get a little confusing in some parts. I had to go back and re-read a couple of passages to make sure I understood the comparison being made, and I am sure my 6 year old was confused as well at our first run through. My guess is that some of it's logic, or finesse got lost in translation, as I believe it was originally published in Turkish. 
That stuff happens, so it wouldn't surprise me. But whether or not the translation was at fault, a little bit of editing should have remedied that issue quickly. 
Overall a good, enjoyable read, that works well in the context of a school lesson plan.
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With mixed media type illustrations, this book explains that size is all relative. It's your power and possibility that are important, not your outward appearance. After all, "we live in a big world with many small worlds in it." You just have to inhabit your world.
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Gökçe İrten’s Can You See Me? is a sweet book about perspective. Size is relative, and viewing others is all about perspective. The illustrations have a mixed media feel of soft watercolor collages and line drawings, making the book appear whimsical. There are limited facts in the book, as the book is not meant to impart a lot of factual knowledge but to get the reader (or listener as the case may be) thinking about different viewpoints. Overall, it’s a cute book worth checking out from the library.
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I received an arc of this title from NetGalley for an honest review. A picture book for kids about big and small and how it's all relative in the scheme of things.
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A really good concept and lesson about perspective for young kids - I do wish the illustrations and story had been a bit brighter, happier and more engaging though. I thought the best comparisons were the water and the ladybug, the elephant footprint and the sightseeing insects. 

This book could definitely inspire a lot of discussion within the classroom.
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