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Daughter of the Morning Star

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Member Reviews

A new Craig Johnson book is always something to look forward to and Daughter of the Morning Star doesn't disappoint.  It brings up difficult subjects that need to be brought out in the open but with Mr. Johnson's flair for telling a good story and characters we know and love this book is a winner.
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Daughter of the Morning Star:  A Walt Longmire Mystery
By Craig Johnson
Viking 
September 2021	

Review by Cynthia Chow

“I am a young woman in modern America, living on the Rez – my life is always in danger.”  When Jaya “Longbow” Long says this to Absaroka Sheriff Walt Longmire, the high schooler is only speaking the truth.  Native women are murdered at a rate ten times higher than the national average, yet the numerous reasons linked to racial and economic disparities are often ignored by the general media.  Jurisdiction miscommunications and confusion play a large role in this as well, which is why Lame Deer, Montana Chief Lono Long has requested/ordered a favor from the Wyoming sheriff.  Absaroka may be the least populated county in the least populated state in America, but Walt has encountered and survived more than his share of criminal investigations.  He’s in the town of Lame Deer with his sizable best friend Henry Standing Bear, aka the Cheyenne Nation, to look into who has been sending over 30 written threats to the promising basketball star Jaya.  Walt can’t help but connect the hostility to the disappearance of Jaya’s older sister Jeanie, the “good” sister last seen on a van trip with friends over a year ago.  

With his unassuming but still very large presence, Walt begins following the trail that leads from Jaya to the last sighting of Jeanie. With a mother in prison and an ex-con father now associating with white supremacists, the cascading tragedies seemed to doom Jaya’s prospects for a future.  That’s where the rest of the Native community steps in though, not only with the coaches but with Walt and Henry.  Inadvertently finding themselves as occasional drop-in girls’ basketball coaches, they humorously yet compassionately deliver sound advice and an occasional kick in the butt.  As they question those who were friends with Jeanie and a part of her complicated life, they all are unable to ignore the repeated sense and presence of the something…dark.  Walt feels it as an ominous void, but the Native people know it as the Éveohtsé heómėse, the Wandering Without that devours souls.  

This 17th of the series resembles the novellas the author has written over the years, shorter tales that highlight the spiritual sides and myths of the Native people.  Yet while Walt and Henry feel guided and haunted by inexplicable forces, they both track down very real threats that have long jeopardized Native women.  Poverty, substance abuse, and systemic racism linked back to the taking of their lands has led to higher rates of teenage suicide and violent crimes against the women.  This novel seems so timely considering the national attention recently given to the disappearance and murder of a white woman, while thousands of Native women go missing or are victimized regularly.  Readers should be reassured though that the author skillfully and masterfully weaves this information into an undoubtedly funny and wry mystery.  The trauma of the Native People seems to have led to the development of a clever and understandably dark sense of humor.   Walt and Henry’s conversations are always a delight, with their dry wit often cynical but based in a long friendship.  Being in Montana means that profane Undersheriff Victoria Moretti only makes brief appearances, but enough to delight longtime fans invested in her and Walt’s relationship.  The compassion of this novel, mixed with the fascinating depiction of life on a Cheyanne reservation, make this another entertaining entry in one of the best mystery series being written today.
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Book 17 in the Longmire Mystery series.  Can be read without reading others in the series, but you should read them all.  Longmire is out of his jurisdiction , doing a favor for the local rez. police chief. Their top female basketball star is receiving threats which might lead back to her sister's disappearance a year ago. Lots of Native American mysticism, which is one of the things I like about these books.
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I received a copy of this book for review from NetGalley.  Craig Johnson, why must you leave me wanting more like this? Walt Longmire is back, this time investigating on behalf Lolo Long, whose teenage niece has received threatening notes. Jaya has had a rough life so far, including the loss of her sister the year before, and Walt quickly began to believe that the two events were connected. With the help of Dog and Henry, he delved deep into the mysteries.
With his trademark hints of mysticism, Johnson crafted a compelling mystery, but the dang cliffhanger left me feeling a bit unsatisfied. I love this series, so I would have read the next book regardless, but I am still a little miffed at the end. This is definitely not a stand alone, but it is a good addition to the series.
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Craig Johnson's Longmire series has been mostly fabulous, with a few spotty books in the mix. This was one of the better ones, with one exception that keeps it from my highest rating. At the very end, I felt as though a crucial aspect of the story was left hanging to make sure that we purchase the next in the series. I don't accept that strategy as one that a truly wonderful writer needs to resort to. Johnson is a truly wonderful writer, so it disturbed me quite a bit.

Two Cheyenne teenage sisters, both basketball players, are plagued by nasty notes. Then one goes missing. Is she dead, is she captured by some sort of mystical force, or is she somewhere in the corporeal world? Longmire is hired by the reservation police to investigate. He works with his longtime Cheyenne friend, Henry, to find the answers, and their search takes them into a very dark place. At the same time, Jaya, the remaining sister, needs guidance as does her basketball team, and somehow Longmire gets involved in this as well. The book is a great story of growing up strong against all odds, at the same time that it delves into racism in the West and, yes, even supernatural influences. As always with this series, the characterization is incredibly strong. And this time around, even in the midst of violence, there are some extremely amusing scenes.

I loved the book, and I will certainly watch for the next in the series, but I would have liked to not have been left hanging.
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Another great installment of the Longmire series.  As usual, whip-smart dialogue; especially between Walt and Henry.  This book also touches on the disproportional abuse, murder, and missing persons associated with Native American women.  As well as the dubious history of "Indian Schools." The plot brings Walt and Henry to Montana and two different Reservations.  Walt is assisting "Rez" law enforcement in the case of a missing girl and threatening notes being sent to her sister, a basketball star with a chip on her shoulder.  The good sheriff even takes a whirl at coaching girl's basketball!  I hope Craig Johnson continues to write these books with their great characters!
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This latest Longmire mystery does not disappoint.  The combination of Indian legend, current events, basketball competition, women's issues, and suspense makes this a thoughtful page-turner.  Johnson's heartfelt introduction about the historical and contemporary tragedy of Indian women's rampant victimization sets the tone.  Readers will not be surprised by the events that take place, but they will be moved.  The familiar characters of Longmire and Henry Standing Bear are front and center, but others such as Vick and Katie remain on the sidelines this time.
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The latest Longmire story finds the good sheriff assisting the tribal police chief in investigating threats to Jaya, a teenage native american star basketball player whose sister disappeared under mysterious circumstances a year earlier. Walt winds up investigating both situations and along the way helps Jaya come to grips with herself and her situation. A very spiritual aspect to the story and the investigation leaves Walt with unanswered questions at the end which will hopefully be resolved in the next book.
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Jaya Long is a Native American sixteen-year-old basketball player. A phenom, and the hope of the Lame Deer Morning Stars girls basketball team. With her playing, there’s a chance to win the state championship. But there is a problem. Jaya is also angry, undisciplined and the victim of threatening notes. Last year her sister Jeanie became one of the many missing Native women, and it seems Jaya may be next. When Walt Longmire, Sheriff of Absaroka County, Wyoming, is asked by Jaya's aunt, Tribal Police Chief Long, to get to the bottom of this mystery, he can't refuse. Both to discover what happened to Jeanie, and save Jaya from the same fate. But matters are more convoluted than he expected. Murder is part of the trafficking. Then there are the visions people, including Longmire, keep having. Oh, and he needs to make sure the basketball team wins their victory. This isn’t going to be easy, you can count on that.

This is another exciting Longmire story that draws attention to the very real plague of missing Native women in the United States today, as well as the jolting proof of abuse at Catholic schools for native children. Read this novel for the great story, but remember its true life basis.
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#DaughteroftheMorningStar #NetGalley
Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the E-arc copy of Daughter of the Morning Star. It was another excellent addition to the Longmire series. I liked the last couple of books, but this one was top notch. I give it 5 stars for Longmire!
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First let me say I am a huge fan of Craig Johnson and I think this book, number 17 in the Walt Longmire series, is another terrific read. Some of his books are heavy on the actions of Walt and the other series regulars ranging from his fellow police officers to local business owners and members of the Cheyenne Indian Nation. And some of his books have more of a mystical, almost other-worldly feel. This book is definitely the latter as Walt joins his long time friend Henry Standing Bear  to try and solve the mystery of a teenage girl from the reservation who has disappeared. Adding to this tragedy is the young woman's sister, a star high school basketball player who has started getting threatening notes. Walt and Henry are such fine men with a sense of decency and honor and I always learn something from reading these books. The story line highlights the continued tragedy of missing Native Woman in Indian Country. The statistics quoted in the book are truly horrifying. I look forward to the next book where I think Walt will continue his quest to find out what has happened to so many of the missing Native children.
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Craig Johnson has created the world's best sheriff in Walt Longmire.  He's loyal to a fault, brave, compassionate, smart, and at times, funny.  Every addition to this series is excellent.  In this book, Walt is doing a favor for the police chief on the nearby reservation.  Native women have been disappearing in frightening numbers and one of the latest is the sister of the star basketball player at the reservation high school.  Now the young basketball player is receiving threats and the Native chief has asked for Walt's help.  He and his best friend, Henry Standing Bear work to find out the source of the notes and at the same time, search for the missing girl.  They accomplish their goals mostly by non-violent means and solve the mystery in the end.

Walt Longmire is a fantastically developed character.  The author's description of Walt's world living next to a huge Native American population with their customs and problems is excellent.  Walt's dry humor is wonderful and makes the stories more readable and fun.  I recommend this series and Daughter of the Morning Star is a great addition.  Craig Johnson has another hit.
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This book was hands down way better than the last one. I enjoyed the storyline and the mystery involving the old Indian schools which looks to continue on in the next book. We got more of Henry Standing Bear and less of Victoria Moretti which is a definite plus. I love the additions of Lolo and Barrett Long. Keep giving us more with Henry and Walt!
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I was apprehensive about reading this book since I was so disappointed in the last entry of this series.  It was with some trepidation that I began to read, waiting for the foul-mouth Vic to make her presence know.  However, I a very happy to report, that the crude deputy is not prominently displayed in this very interesting story and I immersed myself into the current abysmal record of missing indigenous women on our reservations.

Not only is this an exceptional mystery, but it brings to the forefront the misery, the abuse, and the horrible life led on some of the reservations.  I do not believe this gets the publicity it deserves and this narrative of missing women from their native lands will open your eyes to the persistent problem as well as give you a good read.

Highly recommended!
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Another Longmire pleaser. Plenty of mystery, action and a cliffhanger ending. There are supernatural plots that will need to be resolved in another story, which is absolutely fine because who doesn’t want to read the next book? Sports features heavily in this novel. Basketball is a metaphor standing in for self respect, life skills and community/family. Yes, the dark side to reservation life is on full display. Substance abuse, violence and the horrible plight faced by native women just trying to survive is shocking. But it’s intended to be shocking. Craig Johnson is fully aware that often the way to draw attention to an injustice faced by women is by hearing about it from a man. The author does not lightly add his voice to this cause. He rarely wades into social injustices with his own opinions, let alone requests for his readers, but in this case he does both. If ever there were a worthy cause to support, this is it. Walt Longmire is a fine sheriff and a good man, but fatally flawed with the unstoppable urge to save those who are beyond saving. We could all stand to be a bit more like him.
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A jim dandy book - the beginning is a bit hard to take as he relates the number of native American women who are abused, killed or go missing.  I wasn't sure I was going to be able to continue with the book as those facts were so disturbing..  More and more I realize that I have been living a white privileged life without every really realizing it.  Women  basketball figures prominently in the book as does spirituality...Events occur that seem to be beyond the veil, but so believable and necessary to the story.  I think this book may need to be read a couple of times to really get all the meaning out of it.  i wouldn't hesitate to recommend the series and sxpecially this book to anyone.
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My thanks to NetGalley for making an eARC of this book available to me.

Such a greatly entertaining read this was.  This time around we get large portions of Henry and Dog, small yet immensely satisfying portions of Vic, and several scenes of Walt's ongoing feud with Henry's truck, Rezdawg.  We've got a nice set of mysteries to solve, more Native American culture and spirituality, and plenty of Walt's dry humor.  Pick this one up at your own risk, as you won't be able to get anything else done until you finish it.
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