Cover Image: Feeling Sad

Feeling Sad

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Member Reviews

This is a fantastic, educational book for children, which is easy to read, and it has real life pictures of people who are feeling sad.  The book is great for showing children what it looks like and feels like to be sad, which is very useful.  I really like this series of books about different types of emotions, as they help my daughter a lot.

Many thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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This is a great book for younger readers to understand information. It has pictures showing sadness and how to combat these feelings. It gives parents ideas on how to talk to thier children about thier big feelings and how to cope with them and develop coping mechanisms
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Great reader for young kids to practice their reading skills and learn to deal with and talk through their emotions. Lists of high-frequency and content words at the back are included after some guiding questions and tips for caregivers reading the text with young school-aged readers. Part of a fantastic series!
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I thought this book was so educational and accessible! It really put sadness, an emotion that is difficult for adults to experience or process, into words that kids can understand, and have examples for the different ways sadness may manifest for themselves and others.
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This is a great addition to any classroom or home.  I love normalizing feelings in kids.  It is ok to be sad and we need to stop telling kids not to be sad!
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Feeling Sad presents sadness as something everyone feels in different degrees in a way that very young children can understand. It shows babies, children, and grownups exhibiting the body language of sadness. Tips for talking about the content with your child and techniques for increasing their literary fluency are included on the last pages. Useful text for younger children.
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I loved this book. I have a two and a half year old and this book was perfect to read to him. He's at the age where explaining feelings that he's experiencing is something we do daily  even multiple times a day.  Toddlers have huge feelings that are difficult to navigate so I think a book like this is important to read to them and read often. I'll be keeping it handy as a reminder of how we can work through feelings of sadness as they happen.
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A big feelings books for young children on the feelings of sadness. With pictures of other kids dealing with sadness and what you can do to combat sadness. It deals with looking outward towards others and seeing the sadness and helping others with their sadness. The book gives parents ideals on how to talk with their children on their big feelings and the tools to work out their feelings.

A special thank you to Norwood House Press and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review
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Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an electronic copy to read and review. 

As a kindergarten teacher I often have children who exhibit sadness when they have to leave their caregivers; especially at the start of the school year. This book will help all students identify 'sad' as an emotion in themselves and in others. It is especially helpful to let children know how to identify and help someone who may be feeling sad. I really like how the children in the book represent diverse cultures.
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This is the second of three books by this author for young kids I'll be reviewing this month, which focus on difficult feelings that children may have, and may not even have a name for, much less understand, but which are an important part of life; sometimes a debilitating one, and which cover topics such as loneliness, shyness, and in this case, sadness.

The book is about thirty pages long and consists of a series of photographs, mostly of children, accompanied by short captions discussing the topic, asking questions, offering ideas and suggestions about what to do if you have these feelings, how to recognize them, and how to deal with them if you think you see these same feelings in others. Feelings of sadness can derive from a variety of sources and this book does a great job is indicating this.

The captions are not overly dramatic. They're nuanced and reasonable, and indicate that some people might experience some of these feelings part of the time, but otherwise feel fine. In other cases, the feelings might be more pressing. I felt this was a good approach in that it leads thoughts into these areas without risking making children feel like they might be experiencing something they're really not.

Some of the children are so small in these pictures, and so perfectly-formed tiny human beings that it's really a grave pain in the heart to imagine any of them might have feelings such as those that this - and the other books - try to address, but it is a fact of life, and the sooner it's addressed, the better off we all are, not just the child who might be experiencing unaccountable feelings of sadness.

The book is commendably diverse in the imagery it employs, featuring children of all ethnicities. I did note a complete lack of pictures showing children with any sort of disability. I can see how that might distract somewhat from the main topic, or perhaps even lend some confusion, but I honestly do not think it would have hurt to have shown a child with crutches or in a wheelchair. A disability might well be a root cause of feelings of loneliness, sadness, or shyness.

That was my only concern about the book. Otherwise it was wonderful, and I commend this one as a worthy read to both educate children to the issue of sadness in young children, especially when they have been, and are going, through hell with the pandemic, and hopefully to encourage those who don't feel at their happiest, to reach out to others instead of withdrawing.
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This Big Feelings book explores sadness.   Using photographs and kid-friendly language, young readers learn how to recognize sad feelings in themselves and others.   They're also reassured that everyone feels sad sometimes and it might look and feel different for everyone.    Several suggestions are given both for how to help address their own sad feelings along with how to offer support to a friend.

In addition to the emotional intelligence exercise, there is a great reading fluency guide at the end with comprehension questions, suggested activities, and a list of words in the text.  This would be a great resource in pre-K and elementary classrooms.

Many thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review!
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This title is part of a series that hopes to help children recognize and cope with their complex emotions. The photos that accompany the text will help children to recognize how this feeling might look like in others. Ample permission is given for having this feeling and attention is paid to different ways in which it can be expressed. Ways of responding and/or getting help are also included. All in all, a good beginning text on this subject.

Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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