Cover Image: Outdoor Kids in an Inside World

Outdoor Kids in an Inside World

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Member Reviews

This book was inspirational at the start, and got me thinking about a lot of different ideas throughout. 

I have to say by the end of the first chapter, I had to pause reading and look up all the local parks/ trails near our house. It gave me the kick in the butt/ inspiration that I needed mid summer to get back out there and explore nature with my six year old. It also got me bugging my husband (of 10 years/ together 13) about why we have never been camping? He use to talk all the time about how much he loved it and how he wanted our kids to love it too, but he has never said lets go. Now, I think I have him thinking about it too.
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Outdoor Kids in an Inside World is interesting and informative.  It is not an instruction book but rather a wholesome storytelling that outdoorsy families will enjoy and relate to.
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Good book with some solid advice. However some of it comes from a place of privilege in the way that the author has more at his disposal than a lot of people out there. It is a good book and many parents will get a lot out of it just know that some of the stuff that is talked about in here will be harder or not achievable for everyone.
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Outdoor Kids in an Inside World: Getting Your Family Out of the House and Radically Engaged with Nature by Steven Rinella is a call to go outside. This book seems inspired by the author's experiences with his family throughout the pandemic. While I would concede that parts of this book, like the part about hunting, will not be for everyone, I still think that portions of this book would benefit all families. We need to get kids outside and off screens. This book is a call to action. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher with no obligations. These opinions are entirely my own.
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I thought this was going to be more of a guide... though it is in a way. It's more a telling and suggestions of what the author did with his own family. It was really interesting and a great read for parents looking to get their little ones outside more.
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I loved this book, just as I loved his previous books. Partly this is because I enjoy Rinella’s writing style - a mix of poignancy and humor that I find deeply effective. And partly it’s because I share his philosophy and his advocacy for the outdoor life.

Many thanks to NetGally for providing an ARC copy for my review.
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“There can be an elasticity to the circumstances in which we live our lives, and in how we react to those circumstances.”

This quote sums up the vibe of this book. As Rinella shares stories of introducing his children to nature you can see how something as simple as a muddy and rainy camping trip can prepare a child to face future life disparities with optimism. 

Confession. When I requested this book on NetGalley I had no clue who Steven Rinella was. Luckily you don’t have to have seen a single episode of MeatEater in order to have a few good takeaways from his latest book Outdoor Kinds in an Inside World: Getting Your Family Out of the House and Radically Engaged with Nature. Through his personal experiences, Rinella shares how he (and his wife of course) is parenting tough, curious, and competent kids who feel at home in the outdoors.

The book was not what I expected. I was hoping for a larger focus on the ‘how” with ideas for implementing outdoor life with kids. Instead, the format was a blend of practical advice and personal stories, with a heavyweight on the personal stories. Although I found it to be an entertaining read, I would have rather seen the shift of the book’s focus on practical advice. Even for the seasoned outdoors enthusiast, activities like hiking, fishing, camping, etc. are WAY different with kids, especially when it comes to rolling with the punches.

With that being said, I still enjoyed the read and reflecting on Rinella’s experiences and how they may look played in our own home. Especially the idea that this is a journey you (the parent) need to be on too, after all, our kids are a reflection of who we, the parent, are.

I recommend this book to someone who is maybe interested in seeing the benefits of these philosophies through storytelling as opposed to learning the philosophies themselves. 

Thank you, NetGalley, Random House, and Steven Rinella for the gifted eARC in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.
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I’m a big believer that children should spend at least as much time outside as they spend looking at screens. It can be hard to get your children outside. Your family might not consider themselves outdoorsy. This book can help you learn ways you can get your kids outside and enjoy it. It has never been more important to get kids out in nature than it is now. If they’re not connecting with nature as children they’re not going to want to protect it as adults. Even as a family who spends a lot of time outside, I was able to get some ideas for helping my children to connect with nature.
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I requested this book to review because I thought it would be full of practical tips and advice on raising kids outdoors and teaching nature appreciation. This story is more personal stories and sharing of wisdom and lifestyle. I did enjoy the stories but it was not what I had hoped for out of the book. Thank you NetGalley for the eARC in exchange for an honest review.
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This book is great for urban parents who haven’t spent much time in the country or the outdoors. The writing and stories Rinella shared were insightful and enjoyable to read. However, having grown up in the country with a deep love of nature, I felt like Rinella’s suggestions were rather obvious. That being said, I think he’s a fantastic author and if you’re a fan and want to get to know him on a more personal level, this book is for you! He does a great job at being nonjudgmental of other parents and sharing his own perspective at the same time. 

Thank you NetGalley and Random House for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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I love Steve Rinella - I watch his Netflix series and listen to his MeatEater podcast. When I found out about this book, as an outdoor mom, I felt that I had to give it a read (I could even hear his voice in my head narrating). 

In the similar fashion of his series, he shares his wisdom through storytelling and I love that. There are so many parenting books out there that list what you "should" be doing to be a "good" parent. Steve shares his own real-life experiences and has actually opened my mind to new ideas to help nurture a further love for the natural world with my daughter.

Huge thank you to NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group for the opportunity to read this ARC in exchange for my honest opinion.
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This book has lots of ideas for helping take your family outside. During the pandemic there was a feeling of confinement. And even being outside around people you had to wear a mask. Culture these days has children and families spending more and more time inside. So I liked what Rinella has to say about helping your kids have more discovery outside. 

Thanks NetGalley for this ARC!
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My husband and I are both big fans of Steve Rinella, and loved his book American Buffalo. So when this book was announced, I immediately moved it to the top of my “must read” list. It absolutely did not disappoint. 

I loved the conversational tone of this book, and how Rinella shares wisdom and suggestions more through storytelling than bulleted lists. Rather than a boring “how to” guide, this is like talking to a more experienced parent friend who is raising their children in a way you admire. He has opened my eyes to things I can easily do with my son to increase his love for and understanding of the natural world on a daily basis. 

I highly recommend this book for parents of children at any age- your kids are never too young or too old to benefit from this outdoor-centric approach to parenting.
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I enjoyed the author’s perspective and the way he shared it. It made me appreciate my own outdoorsy childhood memories and want to take my kids for a hike right away.
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As a parent, one of our biggest battles can be getting our kids outside in the fresh air when we’ve become such an indoor society. Steven discusses different ways of exploring nature with his family, and how to peak your children’s curiosity about nature. 

This was an interesting read that gave me some great ideas for getting my kids outside (once the damn snow melts). I would definitely recommend this to any parents of littles! Thanks to @netgalley for the opportunity to preview this book. 

Outside Kids in an Indoor World releases on May 3rd by @randomhouse !
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Steven Rinella, host of Netflix's MeatEater, is an avid outdoorsman and hunter. Coming from a tight-knit family bonded by the outdoors, this novel is written to try to engage families in nature. 

As a fellow nature enthusiast, this book immediately caught my eye. I have always wanted a written guide with tips on raising my young children to respect and love nature. I had a certain idea of what I thought this book would have based off the description, but I found it was not what I thought. I had hoped to see a lot of tips, examples of activities, and some personal background pertaining to those topics. Instead, I found that the tips were hard to find, specific examples of activities weren't stated clearly, and there was more personal backstory than anything else. It seemed to be rambling quite a bit. While that rambling had wisdom and was interesting to read, it was not that important to the overall goal of the book. I would have loved to see more bulleted tips and specific activities to implement. 

Having stated what I did not like, there was still a lot I did like. I appreciated the feeling of inspiration knowing any family can do this. We actually ventured into 25 degree weather for a lovely hike because of that inspiration! It was wonderful to read how the Rinella family has bonded and grown together in nature. It is a beautiful picture to think that my family can accomplish this, too. Steven Rinella is definitely knowledgeable and this book shows it. If you are looking for more of a memoir and inspirational book to help your family engage with nature, this is a great resource. If you are looking for what I first thought this was, you may want to find another guide. Overall, this was a good read.
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As an outdoor adventure lover interested in learning methods to bring my child outdoors as she grows up, I was excited to read this book. The author is very knowledgeable and experienced with both being in nature himself and bringing his children out into nature. This book includes a lot of great insight and advice regarding how to bring your kids into nature more and enjoy it. I will definitely keep this advice in mind as my daughter is growing up.

The main thing I didn't like about this book was how the information was presented. At times the personal stories were too long. While they could be relevant, sometimes they seemed rambling. I would have appreciated if everything was more to the point - giving advice to parents. Also, I wish the information had been separated by titled sections in order to find information more easily. While reading whole books is great, as a busy parent, sometimes you just want to flip to something and read it without having to sift through the pages.
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This was a bit different than I was expecting, though I really liked how knowledgeable the author is about everything from camping to foraging, gardening, hunting, and connecting with nature.  I did feel a little intimidated at the breadth of knowledge and experience the author has with hunting, cooking, and foraging, but he does a nice job of reminding families to start with where they are in terms of experience and location.  I also liked that screens or devices were acknowledged as having a place at times (sometimes even when they went ice fishing) but that the family works on exploring and letting themselves get bored at times when they are outdoors.

This was such a nice reminder of all the simple joys that families can access in the outdoors and the fact that we are part of nature and at our most basic when we are outside.  I think this book will be a wonderful connection for families as they look for socially distanced and nature-filled ideas.
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As a nature lover and advocate of children spending ample unstructured time in nature, this book immediately jumped out to me as something I knew would resonate with my heart. There has been a lot of buzz around the nature deficit our children are experiencing, not just the loss of space to interact with nature, but also the adult initiative and freedom to do so. I’d argue adults are also facing a nature deficit, even just a couple hour a week have been shown to have significant improvements to physical and emotional health and still the divide between inside and outside are becoming surprisingly harder to step through. 

Steven Rinella offers data, personal stories, and tangible ideas about the shifts caregivers can take to cultivate “outdoor kids” If you’ve grappled with how to get pry your kids away from the screens and outside this book is a great start. And the very best foot forward in this journey begins with your lead.
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This is a great resource! It is full of easy to implement strategies and ideas for families to get outside and enjoy being together. This is one I'll return to again and again. Many thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley for the advanced copy of the book.
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