Cover Image: Analog Heart

Analog Heart

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Member Reviews

It started of good but by the 80% mark I was ready for the story to be over. This is more my personal feelings but the book was trying to make robots real and make them feel human especially with what happens to the main character in the epilogs but I just wasn't buying it. So what was supposed to an emotional ending fell flat. Other than that it was an interesting Sci fi story exploring what it really mean to be alive and a living thing. I just wasn't convinced.
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Bronson Dodge is a man on borrowed time. The nanobots and special upgrades given to him by Cascade Corp while he was their security chief are nearing their expiration date and won't be renewed now that he has quit. Dodge gets by swigging TONIC to juice his systems a bit more, working as a detective and security enforcer to make money to buy more TONIC. But he is nearing the bitter end, which is advertised to be excruciating. One night Dr. Isla Bligh and her ward Ava arrive at his door fleeing Cascade and begging for his help. Although his memory is glitching - something that seems to be affecting everyone, human and robot - Dodge takes on the job of getting Isla and Eva to a safe haven. A safe haven that is needed because Ava isn't a girl but a synth, a kind of robot that does not exist. 

It's an interesting enough story involving that is not properly edited in the ARC.  The text is littered with partial sentences, awkward phrasing, terrible similes, and other nastys that make it a bit hard to read. Will it get cleaned up in the final edit?
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I usually prefer my AI sci-fi in video content to wanting to see what others see. However, Analog Heart had enough description to keep me from questioning the looks of the AI in the story. I will admit I still have questions regarding why some robots appeared so old and what came of different characters. But it was a really good story. I feel those who enjoy sci fi with robots and AI conflict should read this book.
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An impressive take on the transhumananist/AI genera. The protagonist, Bronson Dodge, is a PI/troubleshooter for hire who is a fast fading augmented human. He was the head of security for the most advanced robotics/AI company in the world. Then something happened, he's not quite sure what. There are many other things going on that are not what they seem. Robotics/Androids are not as advanced as he (thinks he) remembers. Then he meets Ava, and his world is turned upside down.
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This was a unexpected find not having read this authors before. Bronson has a need which you will see what and why. He will get the unexpected in Isla. If the robots were not interesting enough then more comes to tweak it to a higher lever. Turn the pages to see if it will be more than survival.
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This is a very interesting story.  A slightly different take on the typical human vs. AI conflict, here the humans are winning.  After creating sentient AI, humans decided this was not a good thing and have largely succeeded in putting it back in the box with the help of a drug that alters memory.  Isla is an AI scientist working at what seems to be one of the most powerful corporations on Earth, Cascade, and she finds herself with a sentient AI child Ava that she can't quite remember much about.  Dodge is the former head of security for the lab Isla works for, but he is dying from the breakdown of highly sophisticated nanotechnology in his body that can turn him into a sort of superhuman.  He is scraping by as a detective, and Isla recruits him to escape Cascade with the advanced AI they are trying to eliminate.  This is a dilemma for Dodge, since his whole career was about eliminating rogue AIs, and though his memory is very faulty, the death of his wife and daughter seem to perhaps be AI related.  Dodge, Isla, and Ava are likeable and relatable.  Things get a bit sappy at the end, and the feelings these three develop for each other in the course of a few days feels implausible, but whatever, happy endings are nice.  I would have liked to understand the backstory a bit more though.  How did Livia Faraday come about?  Why does she seem more like an AI than a human?  How did she invent the memory drug?  What was the event or events that led to rolling back AI to a pre-sentient form?  Downloading human consciousness into a robot at the end seems a stretch.  But, all in all, a very entertaining, well told story.  The publishing model is also intriguing, where it seems writing novels is a group effort of a small group of authors with some interesting pseudonyms.  I wouldn't expect that to work out, but the books I've read so far from this group have been quite good!
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