Cover Image: How Not to Age

How Not to Age

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Member Reviews

Interesting ideas shared in a clear and systematic fashion. I don’t really agree with some of the ideas expressed nor do I feel this had enough evidence to support their arguments most of the time but it’s readable and I’m sure it aligns with someone else’s world view more clearly than my own. I’d have loved to see a stronger scientific foundation.

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If you like the format of Dr. Greger's books (I do), you will enjoy this new work. How Not to Die remains a must, and this one is a great evidence-based extension for folks who enjoyed Dan Buettner's Netflix series (or books) about the Blue Zones. We all want to add life to our years - this is a good start. One change to this book that I love is that the entire tome is content. If you want the extensive links to studies and research, you are directed online. Great use of space here.

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Dr Greger has done a great job of delivering scientific information with occasional wit and humor. I am hooked on this approach, it adds a personal touch as though one is conversing with their longtime personal doctor beyond the twenty minute allotment allowed in medicine today. I will keep this book at the ready for quick reference as I continue to age, armed with information that knowledge and understanding is indeed power. Thank you Dr Greger!

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We all age, but Dr. Greger provides us with all the ways not to age in his new book, How Not to Age. He provides evidence based information to address the diet and lifestyle choices we have that impact aging. I enjoyed how he took complex research studies and presented them to the reader in actionable ways. His recommendations are well-grounded, scientifically studied, and surprisingly simple. I am adjusting my diet and lifestyle to fit his recommendations, and am looking forward to aging more gracefully.

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A tome of nutritional research, "How Not to Age" offers a bevy of great tips to help you improve how you eat to extend your life. I came away from this with so many new possibilities to further change up my eating habits for the better.

I only have a few dings that bring it down a star...one, it's SO long. The author mitigates this a bit by offering easy-to-access links to videos and an extensive online bibliography. Even so it clocks in at nearly 650 pages, so be ready for that, particularly if you are on a digital reader and it seems like your percentage count is barely changing.

Additionally, the book advocates for 100% veganism, which is also the case in his previous book, "How Not to Die." That doesn't mean that you won't get a lot out of it if you are a pescatarian or meat eater--you will--but there is a very particular slant that excludes studies that show any positive benefits of dairy, fish, or meat.

That said, it's still very much worth a read for anyone who is trying to eat healthier and prevent disease.

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This book is the latest in a series by Dr. Michel Greger about nutrition and health. It is a very comprehensive book that looks at many nutrition, exercise and lifestyle factors that can contribute to longevity. The book is almost overwhelming with the amount of footnotes and studies cited. As a nutritionist who is used to reading studies, the amount of this was overwhelming even to me. The book refers to charts and tables but these were not included in my advanced copy. They would have been helpful to have seen.
I decided to read this book as a 65 year old who has a goal of living to a healthy 100. As a nutritionist I did not personally learn much new from this book. . Greger is a strong proponent of veganism. I am not. I follow a Weston Price philosophy of eating which is all natural whole foods, including animal products and dairy. Greger ignores Price’s research which showed many different cultures around the world eating varied diets without modern diseases. These include the Kitavans in the Pacific eating a high fat diet. mostly coconuts, as well as the Maasai in African eating diets high in meat and dairy. He also ignored the recent PURE study which found no correlation between diets high in either unprocessed red meat, chicken and mortality. Gregor also ignored the devastating consequences from the huge increase in omega 6 fats from vegetable oils. To learn more about that I recommend the recent book The Ancestral Diet Revolution by Chris Knobbe.
Readers may learn some good things from this book, but could be overwhelmed if not well versed in health and nutrition. I received an advanced copy from the publisher via NetGalley.

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