Cover Image: Rebecca, Not Becky

Rebecca, Not Becky

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Member Reviews

Funny and thought-provoking. I thought about this book long after I finished reading it. I enjoyed the evolving friendship between the two women. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for providing the ARC.

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Rebecca, Not Becky by Christine Platt and Catherine Wigginton Greene is an intriguing exploration of stereotypes and interracial friendships between upper class women. Written by both Black and White authors, they use their individual perspectives to show the realities and intricacies of race. Platt and Greene add lots of humor that made me laugh out loud.

The story opens with De’Andrea Whitman who moves with her husband and daughter from Atlanta to Rolling Hills, an upscale gated community in Virginia to be closer to her ailing mother-in-law. She’s not thrilled with the fact that they will be the only Black family in the neighborhood. Urged to make a “White friend” she joins the diversity committee at her daughter’s new school where she meets the facilitator, Rebecca Myland. Rebecca is excited to have a Black woman join her group, especially when she finds a new cause to fight for racial justice. Reluctant to befriend the woman she secretly refers to as “Becky”, De’Andrea shows interest in Rebecca’s mission. The more they spend time together they learn that they have more in common than either could have imagined.

This novel was a fun and witty read for me. It’s also enlightening when viewed from the perspective of different cultures. Some readers may not appreciate some of the cultural references, but I believe that the writers were right on target in getting the point of the story across. From my point of view, it’s that regardless of race or ethnicity have more common bonds than we dare to believe. I hope that the authors will choose to write another novel together in the future.

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This was a timely, satirical comedy that did keep my interest. It pokes fun at some of the extreme “woke” white women that exist is this fictional post-racial reckoning world. While there were some thought-provoking moments for both the Black and White protagonists, something about the book’s pacing or organizational structure fell a little flat for me. I liked this book, but didn’t love it. Therefore, I’m rating this book 3 stars ⭐️. Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the advanced copy for review.

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The book started off a mess, thanks in large part to one of the narrators for me, but it really tapped into some huge racial tensions in a lighthearted, yet in your face way. I really enjoyed the sincerity, tenderness and openness that both characters shared. Both were also dealing with mother in laws with serious health conditions. Rebecca, Not Becky, follows the Whitman family, who is forced to relocate from their beloved Atlanta to Northern Virginia due to family commitments. Rolling Hills is very white, and Rebecca Myland, the head of the local private school’s Parent Diversity Committee, is very interested in making a black friend to prove that she is not racist. The book follows Rebecca’s attempts to befriend De’Andrea and De’Andrea’s struggle to find her place, both as professional who can make a difference and as a black woman in her community. In short, this was a decent read. I think the clear audience is older white woman who are starting their antiracist journey. My biggest complaint is that the story felt flat. The characters lacked substance and the plot was very heavy on telling, not showing. I feel like I never truly got to know any of the characters beyond the surface level. Still confused on Heidi… it was entertaining enough but not a book I would rush to recommend to others.

Thank you NetGalley, the author and Amistad for THE OPPORTUNITY

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A black family moves to an all=white suburb. D'Andrea, the mom, misses her friends but learns to deal with Rebecca, who leads the diversity group at her daughter's school. They have several interactions as their daughters become best friends and learn to deal with racism and diversity issues. Very thought-provoking.

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3.5 stars

While I thought the storyline and the concept of the novel was interesting and extremely timely given current events and the state of our country, I felt that some aspects of the plot were left unfinished by the end. I wish some things were resolved or at least given a bit more explanation before it was over. I felt it ended too abruptly. However, I did still enjoy the novel. I wasn’t sure how I felt about the characters at first-especially Rebecca-but they grew on me by the end of the novel. The characters were a bit stereotypical, but I think this was an intentional decision by the author. The book gives you a lot of things to think about in terms of race issues in our country.

I believe this book would be great for book clubs. There is much to discuss not only about the characters, but also about current events.

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This book grew on me, but for the first 30%, I didn't really like either character or understand where the story was going. If you are reading this and have the same feelings, I'm here to encourage you to keep going. It is a delightful story and I enjoyed the development of each character and their relationships as the book progressed.

The first chapters where we are introduced to De'Andrea and Rebecca painted them as caricature's, especially Rebecca as the "woke white woman" but I think the author did this to help show the development and intersection of the characters later in the story. Frustrating while reading, but made sense when you take the book as a whole.

De'Andrea moves to Rolling Hills, Virginia to be closer to her mother-in-law's memory care facility. Coming from Atlanta, Rolling Hills' whiteness is jarring. When De'Andrea's daughter, Nina, becomes fast friends, with Rebecca's white daughter, Isabella, the two women's lives being to intersect. De'Andrea is skeptical of Nina and Nina is overeager to welcome De'Andrea to their community and join the school's diversity committee. Told in a dual POV, this book explores the many sides of racial conversation and action. What a big undertaking -- the illuminate issues while also keeping a story cohesive and entertaining -- but I enjoyed the journey.

4 Stars

Thank you NetGalley and Amistad for an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review.

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It took me quite a while to get into this book, but I am really glad I stuck with it. At first, both FMC - De’Andrea and Rebecca - were unlikeable and difficult for me to love. However, by the end of the book, I LOVED De’Andrea and was really invested in Rebecca’s personal growth.

Rebecca, Not Becky, follows the Whitman family, who is forced to relocate from their beloved Atlanta to Northern Virginia due to family commitments. Rolling Hills is very white, and Rebecca Myland, the head of the local private school’s Parent Diversity Committee, is very interested in making a black friend to prove that she is not racist. The book follows Rebecca’s attempts to befriend De’Andrea and De’Andrea’s struggle to find her place, both as professional who can make a difference and as a black woman in her community.

This is definitely a book I would recommend. There were some aspects of the writing that I didn’t love, but the story kept me turning the pages. 3.5 stars!

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I did not really know what to expect from this book when I first started reading it. I was pleasantly surprised. The book is really good and it gave food for thought. I feel it was very realistic in the subject matter and could happen to any of us, on both sides of the fence. Great read. Thanks to NetGalley, the author and the publisher for the ARC of this book in return for my honest review. Receiving the book in this manner had no bearing on my review.

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Thank you @netgalley for the Advanced Reader Copy! Of course I had to read a book called Rebecca, Not Becky! It is cowritten by Christine Platt and Catherine Wigginton Greene. Two women, one white and one black, are neighbors in a wealthy neighborhood. They try to become friends, and (the white woman especially) contend with racial stereotypes they don’t even realize they have. It’s supposed to be humorous but also deal with real issues. I liked this okay but didn’t love it. Probably 3 star book for me. #rebeccanotbecky #christineplatt #catherinewiggintongreene #netgalley #advancedreadercopy #arc #bookstagram #booklover #reader #bookblog #lovetoread #fictionreader #bookreview #bookrecommendation #readersofinstagram #bookloversofinstagram #takeapagefrommybook #readallthebooks #booksbooksbooks #booksofinstagram #bookwormproblems #bookaholic #booknerd #whattoread #readingtime #bookaddict #ilovetoread #ilovebooks #needtoread #readallday

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Thanks to NetGalley and Amistad for this advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review.
I participated in a webinar where the authors discussed their book and I was intrigued. I wasn’t sure if it would be a book I would be interested in but it sounded funny something out of my wheelhouse.
Having attended that webinar, I see where the authors were going with their book and I appreciate what must have been an incredible process of open discussion, honesty and true respect for one another. Topics of race are not easy and the media has made everyone afraid of broaching the subject without backlash.
What I go from the book were some true feelings on race and how the media portrays some issues (confederate statues) and how some people view the topic (there is a statue there?)
Overall good, lighthearted approach to difficult topics. I liked it!
3.5*

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Really enjoyed this story and the important themes and conversations throughout. I appreciated the fact that both of the main characters, Rebbeca and Deandrea were presented as nuanced, flawed, compassionate and still growing women. The character development of Rebecca learning how and when to speak up as an ally was amazing. DeAndrea learning how to be protective of her daughter given her own trauma surrounding racism but also allowing the space for her daughter's story to be different was great. I also really liked the depth added to the exploration of DeAndrea and Malik's connection and marriage. All and all a great read exploring some important themes.

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I was provided with the Advance Reader Copy of this book. It's the story of two families-- De’Andrea Whitman’s family who are Black and Rebecca Myland 's who are white. D'Andre and her family are uprooted from a comfortable life and a circle of close friends in Atlanta and move to an upscale, white, gated community in VA. Her daughter, Nina begins kindergarten in the new community where she meets Rebecca's daughter Isabella. The two girls instantly become "best friends." Rebecca is head of the school’s Diversity Committee—in an all white school. Rebecca is determined to make friends with De’Andrea and De’Andrea has been given task by her therapist to make a white friend. In the midst of all this, both families are dealing with beloved family members with dementia. Of course, there are ups and downs. The book tackles overt racism, as well not so obvious racism—(perhaps out of ignorance?) We know this exists and what better way to show it than through work of fiction? I was wishing the two women would learn from the example of their daughters and become friends without expectations.

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Thank you Netgalley and Amistad for an arc of Rebecca Not Becky by Christine Platt and Catherine Wigginton Greene. This book is about two suburban housewives, one Black and one white, and how they navigate racial issues in a mostly white town. Alternating between both women’s points of view, provides an interesting way to look at race.

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I enjoyed this book! I think it tackled race and racism in a modern way, and the characters were fun to read about. I found Rebecca's family drama really exciting, like a reality show, and I could easily picture her and the other white women in Rolling Hills. De'Andrea and her family were very cute to read about, and I felt that she's probably someone many people can relate to (though not so much me because I'm white and childless). Thank you to NetGalley and Amistad for this ARC!

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The title of this book is what grabbed me first, and then the synopsis made me want to pick it up as soon as possible! The story moved at a good pace but once I was 50% in, I began to wonder where the story was going and it was unclear.. The two main characters, one a Black woman and the other white woman, were written as caricatures of themselves. Unfortunately, the dialed up nature of both characters appealed to me less and less and I kept reading. For me, it was a large element of the story that proved to be more of a distraction than an addition. I wish the characters had more of a realistic portrayal. The one element of the book that felt like it connected and was real was the relationship both women had with their mother-in-laws who were living in an Alzheimer's facility. Overall, this book just didn't work for me.

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This is the book I needed 7 years ago when my son first entered a PWI, to learn how to navigate these white spaces. Meet De'Andrea and Rebecca, 1 Black mother and 1 White mother navigating the world of Magnolia Country Day School. Expectations are set too high about this diversity committee and true colors are shown when they petition to take down a confederate statue. It reminded me a little of The Hate U Give, but with PA parents. Oppression Olympics are brought up with the character of Jenny Q. The question of whether all white women are Beckys or Karens is raised and whether or not it is on Black people to educate them. I found the ending to be a bit unrealistic though- I would've never went back! I thoroughly enjoyed this book and the questions it raises. If our Black children have to learn about race at an early age, so should White kids.

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I DNFed this (twice!) so I won't be rating on other sites. I picked this up shortly after being approved for it, couldn't get past the first or second chapter. Picked it back up again recently, and - try as I may - couldn't finish it again. The characters were unlikable and such flat stereotypes. It felt like it was trying too hard to make a point, reinforcing a lot of telling not showing and using those stereotypes and other things that just felt really topically trendy and that will age poorly. :(

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This book taught me a lot about the growing I still need to do to become anti-racist.

The novel is told from two viewpoints: DeAndrea and Rebecca. DeAndrea and her family are moving from Atlanta to Rolling Hills, from a vibrant urban city filled with successful black people to a very white town. They are drawn here by the wonderful dementia facility, which will house DeAndrea's mother-in-law. Her early onset dementia is hard to watch, but there's no question that they want to be close enough to visit her a few times a week.

Rebecca is the president of the diversity committee at her children's school. When she learns DeAndrea's family is moving into their neighborhood and attending school with her kids, she can't wait to meet her and finally have a black face on the diversity committee (not to mention a black friend).

At first, this book really irritated me. DeAndrea expects the worst when she moves to Rolling Hills. Rebecca is clueless and naive. They seemed more caricature than real people. But the more I read, the more I understood them. The more I realized I'm not that different than Rebecca (or Becky), and I had something to learn from this book.

You won't be surprised what happens to DeAndrea's family, but hopefully you also will be moved to do your part to make things better in your own world. I'm going to continue to do my reading and learning about racism, and examine my life to find the micro aggressions I'm sure I'm committing.

Thanks to Netgalley for the advance copy of this book.

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The summary of this book felt right up my alley, but I couldn't finish, mostly because the main characters ended up feeling a bit more like caricatures than fully fleshed out characters. The set up does feel as though it's full of great conflict. I just don't think I'm the reader for this.

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