Cover Image: ADHD Girls to Women

ADHD Girls to Women

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date:

Member Reviews

There was a lot to like about this book. So many times the narratives struck home and the well researched explanations of why ADHD brains behave this way was enlightening. Compared to how much of ADHD diagnosis and treatment occurs here in the US, focusing almost entirely on the experience of white boys, this approach to understanding and managing symptoms feels light years ahead. However, and here is where it becomes only a middling book, some of the information felt surprisingly dated. The entire book is strictly binary when it comes to gender and treats sex and gender as one synonymous entity.

Was this review helpful?

ADHD Girls to Women is a comprehensive, well-researched book that is specific about the impact and implications of ADHD diagnoses on girls and women. Skoglund draws from her expertise as a clinical psychologist to navigate the complex journey of females with ADHD.

While this book is a short read, it unfortunately leaves me wanting more - I understand that the research on ADHD in females is lacking, but there is no commentary on where we go from here.
However, I am impressed with how detailed Skoglund is from a biological standpoint. She touches upon structures of the brain and emotions and how this impacts the patient as they develop through life.

I would like to see Skoglund's expertise on the treatment of ADHD women, especially the effects of medication on the biological level.



Thanks to NetGalley and Jessica Kingley Publishers for the ARC.

Was this review helpful?

I liked this book a lot. As a woman with adhd I appreciate that more research is being done on girls & women. (Our symptoms/issues are completely different than boy/mens.) This book focuses on that difference and ways to help in a nonboring way.

Was this review helpful?

As a psychotherapist that works with children and adults with ADHD, I was excited to read this book by Lotta Borg Skoglund on ADHD in girls and women. Much of the research on ADHD has been done with AMAB people and girls and women tend to be misdiagnosed or diagnosed later than their male counterparts. Literature on the presentation of ADHD in women is much-needed, and I was happy to see that the work of Swedish Psychiatrist Lotta Borg Skoglund had been translated into English in this edition.

Overall, I appreciated this book. I liked the vignettes that illustrated how ADHD affects women specifically. I did find it unsatisfying in terms of suggestions about how to support women and girls with ADHD. Skoglund emphasizes ADHD as a disability that has significant negative effects on girls and women. I wish that there had been some more of a strengths-based approach and/or thoughts on how to effectively navigate ADHD. I also felt that some acknowledgement of the nuances of gender identity could have been helpful.

All in all, this was an interesting book about an important topic. However, it had some shortcomings and ultimately will not have a significant impact on my clinical practice. This would likely be best for a woman who has recently been diagnosed with ADHD and is trying to cope with shame surrounding this.

Thanks so much to Lotta Borg Skoglund and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for this ARC through NetGalley. ADHD Girls to Women: Getting on the Radar is available now!

Was this review helpful?

Fascinating book that gave me great insight . Easy to read and very straightforward direction

I’ll be recommending to everyone that I know . If you haven’t seen this yet then add it to your shopping basket today .

Was this review helpful?

"ADHD Girls to Women" is a timely and invaluable resource shedding light on the often overlooked experiences of girls and women with ADHD. Delving into various dimensions—social, cultural, medical, and historical—the book offers crucial insights and prompts deep reflection. While some sections may feel weighty and challenging to grasp, the text overall delivers invaluable, accessible, and insightful perspectives. It navigates through the complexities of ADHD with importance and sensitivity, making it an essential read for anyone seeking a deeper understanding of this area.

Was this review helpful?

A wonderfully informative book bringing the often overlooked or misunderstood subject of female ADHD into focus. It certainly explained so much for me. An invaluable guide for professionals and as a general read.

Was this review helpful?

A look into what ADHD looks like in girls and women. Girls often get overlooked when it comes to ADHD diagnoses and this book dives into why that happens and how it manifest differently in girls.

I liked the info presented here a lot! I think it could have been organized in a better way because at times it felt repetitive. But otherwise, really interesting and informative!

I received my copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Was this review helpful?

Thank you for the opportunity to read this! I really liked this book although it was very information heavy as you would probably expect! As someone going through the process to see if I have ADHD as an adult, it was really interesting to learn more about the subject and relate to those struggles shared throughout the book. It’s great to raise awareness about the condition in girls and women, and I hope years into the future more girls and women get the help they need with ADHD.

Was this review helpful?

Thank you, Jessica Kingsley publishers, Lotta Borg Skoglund, and Netgalley for an arc of this book. I love books like this that help normalize ADHD in women and give coping techniques and help hack your brain to be productive.

Was this review helpful?

This is definitely a more academic and dry book than others recently published on this subject, but I still found this interesting and knowledgeable. 3.5/5 Stars

Was this review helpful?

Incredibly informative book! Read from the perspective of a psychology student who might have adhd to be honest. It is good to bring the information forward that adhd in women needs to be looked into more, needs to be diagnosed correctly, and explained and treated in the right ways. This book, however is not focused on giving tips to women with adhd on how to deal with it. It can be very interesting if you have adhd, but if youre looking for self-help, this isnt it. I do think everyone psychologist should read into this and learn about this, and i for sure hope we can all work together to help women who struggle with adhd.

Thank you to netgalley and the author for sending me the book in exchange for an honest review.

Was this review helpful?

This was a nice counter to ADHD for Smart Ass Women. Where that book screamed "you're creative! and sensitive! and observant! hooray!" this one was a call to take ADHD seriously and get the people who have it help.

This book is probably most beneficial to medical practitioners and therapists. It could also be interesting for someone who knows someone with ADHD, or someone who suspects they have it. For me, it was more of the "these people sound just like me" feeling. It was also a bit of a downer, as the author really drove home the disability aspect and offered little to nothing in the way of remedies. As a mid-30s, recent diagnosee, I am aware of the negative repercussions of not having a diagnosis in childhood or early adulthood. Contemplating them at great length isn't helpful for me.

Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC.

Was this review helpful?

Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC.

ADHD Girls to Women almost feels like a call to the medical community to step up and break down the gender bias in ADHD research. This book explained the female brain and how ADHD can present at different stages of life. Women have been under diagnosed for decades and shamed for their issues due to the gender bias both in medicine and society in general. This is a very informative book that would serve any woman who thinks she may have ADHD or anyone who may have a another female in their life with this diagnosis (or the symptoms but no diagnosis) well.

Was this review helpful?

As a woman with a late diagnosis of ADHD (AuDHD in fact), I found this an interesting read. I know a lot of reviewers felt it wasn't so accessible and I can completely understand why but I think it was digestible enough for me. It's a solid book - clear and reassuring and explores why girls and women are so often overlooked or misunderstood. The real life case studies were so insightful. However, I'm not sure this would be my absolute go-to recommendation in the area. It's more an interesting supportive read for those interested in learning more.

Was this review helpful?

I think this is an important read for any women who think they may have a missed ADHD diagnosis. It really presents differently in women.

Was this review helpful?

Thank you to Netgalley and the author for the free book in exchange for review.


I wanted to like this book - it was better than ADHD for Smart Ass Women but not as good as How to ADHD. This is another one of those books that was harder to read - it felt like I was reading something for school and not a book helping me with my ADHD. Overall I would love to read more accessible books about ADHD that are written by and for people with ADHD.

Was this review helpful?

Ever since I came across a video about ADHD a few years ago, I suspected I might have it myself. The first I noticed, however was that as a woman that was looking for more information about it I coudn't find many other woman talking about it.
As I am now in the process of finding a doctor who can start my process of diagnose, I found this book to be just what I needed. It was interesting to learn more about ADHD, how it presents to other women and girls, to learn more about the experiences of women and girls.
The book is really well written, it doesn't have an overly scientific tone. However, I do have to say that at times it felt that a lot of information was presented at once, which made me feel a bit overwhelmed and made me disconnect from what I was reading.

Was this review helpful?

I was disappointed with this book. "ADHD Girls to Women" explores the subject that in previous years was written about quite a lot. Sadly, the author doesn't push the conversation beyond summarising the symptoms and traits that often are minimised or unnoticed. Yes, the personal stories are a nice touch, but what was missing for me is what comes after the diagnosis - what interventions, therapeutic modalities work best or simply, how the women portrayed in this book coped (or even not coped!) with their struggles, i.e. what adjustments and adaptations were used. Sadly, there's nothing original about this publication and I expected more, considering author's credentials.

Was this review helpful?

As someone who strongly suspects that I have ADHD myself, only realising as an adult, it has been very eye-opening to see the information available here which comprehensively looks at how it presents it girls and women.

Was this review helpful?