Anywhere Faith

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 13 Feb 2018

Member Reviews

Great book. Teaches us that Faith is something we can have anywhere we go. I highly recommend to anyone.
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Anywhere faith is a beautiful book that is well presented, described and truly inspiring. Heather King writes funny and practical stories from the lives of Bible heroes, also her own life, She teaches the importance of obedience, relationship, saying “Yes!” to God. We need a lot of faith in our life. Would recommend this book to anyone.
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In Anywhere Faith, Heather C. King helps us to learn about Abraham and his journey to an unknown destination. God called him out of a place called Ur and told him to go, without knowing where to go or how long it would take to get there. Everyone wants faith like Abraham, without counting the cost. In a moment of soul honesty and penetrating analysis, Heather realizes the worst nightmare scenario of not knowing where the road leads to or how long it will take to get there! We have to trust God wholeheartedly, instead of trusting in our own worthless plans. Abraham deserves superfaith status for his radical obedience and unquestioning faith that does not complain at any cost. Not only was he ready to follow God anywhere, but he also passed a greater faith test. Abraham and his wife, Sarah, waited for almost thirty years, from God's promise of a baby, to the actual moment when they held their precious child of promise, Isaac, in their arms. When Isaac was finally born, Abraham was one hundred years old and Sarah was ninety. Isaac was a miracle child — a gift from God and the glorious fulfllment of the divine promise to Abraham that he would become the father of many nations.

God tested Abraham’s faith by asking him to place his son's life on the line. Years after Isaac’s birth, God asked Abraham to climb the mountain with his young son and build an altar, supposedly to kill Isaac as a sacrifice to God. God asked Abraham to give back the promised child. "How could Isaac possibly be both the promised son and a sacrifice?" Abraham did not question God or try to reason with Him. Instead, with his unquestioning, obedient faith, he did not stall at all. “Abraham rose early in the morning, saddled his donkey, took his men with him, and his son Isaac. He cut the wood for the burnt offering and arose and went to the place of which God had told him” (22:3). God called in the night, and early the very next day, Abraham did exactly as God commanded. In Hebrews 11, Abraham was willing to obey God in the most radical of ways because he knew God was able even to raise Isaac from the dead. While we might stall, question, and fight with God, Abraham simply believed in the impossible. God could raise Isaac up from death if He chose. 

Are we ready to be used  by God, to do only what He wants us to do, and go anywhere He wants us to go? Will we choose God over everything else? This is the wholehearted, selfless devotion God desires from us. He won't settle for anything else. Even Abraham made mistakes, when he trusted his own plans and not God’s, when his faith broke down and he tried to take matters into his own hands. Our faith “superheroes” weren’t superhuman at all. When God called them, they responded honestly - sometimes telling God they didn’t know if they could do what He asked. Moses wanted God to send somebody else. Gideon worried about whether he heard God correctly. Elijah felt alone. Isaiah felt unworthy. Esther was terrified. When God calls us, we answer hesitatingly, afraid to get intimate with God, fearing that He might ask us to give what we cannot, terrified to move forward for fear of failure, or that the costly task might hurt too much. 

A. W. Tozer said, “We can be in our day what the heroes of faith were in their day —but remember at the time they didn’t know they were heroes." The faith heroes and heroines were regular people with perfectly ordinary lives, insecure and frightened, but choosing to obey God anyway. They followed Him in spite of fear, insecurity or questions. In Anywhere Faith, Heather C. King writes about dialogue, relationship and friendship with God. She explains how to respond to Him when He asks us to trust and obey. When God called men and women throughout Scripture to follow Him, and their answers in that moment of their calling revealed the honest truth about their heart condition and their faith condition. We love God and want to follow Him. We want to be “anywhere faith” Christians and pray like David Livingstone did: “Lord, send me anywhere, only go with me.” But we have struggles, or even excuses, that hold  us back. We want to be God’s friend like Abraham, but we have hidden away parts of our hearts from God, our Creator. 

When we hide our hearts from God, our deep-rooted fears and insecurities weigh us down, chaining us to the darkness, and not allowing God's light to shine into our hearts, to deliver and to liberate us. Let us give God the freedom to do His work in us. When we bring our needs to Him, He rescues us. When we feel afraid, He gives us peace. When we are unworthy, He clothes us in His righteousness. When we confess the painful truth that we don't want to go, He reveals His sovereignty and grace to give us the strength and courage to undertake the journey. "The Lord shows compassion to those who fear Him." God knows the truth of our hearts because He made us. He has compassion on us. He wants to rescue us. He beckons us to bring Him our brokenness, to make us whole and holy. God invites us into His presence, promising that it will be worth any sacrifice, effort, or price we pay. Surely we can trust Him. "God is love” (1 John 4:16). He will never leave us: “Be strong and courageous. The Lord goes with you. He will not leave you or forsake you” (Deuteronomy 31:6). “We know that all things work together for good for those who love God, who are called according to His purpose” (Romans 8:28). With promises as trustworthy as this, can we resist Him any longer? Let us honestly tell Him the truth: “God, in spite of my fears, uncertainties and insecurities, I’m coming with You anyway! I’ll go with You anywhere, to do anything You ask me to do.”

Prayer by David Livingstone, missionary to Africa:

"Lord, send me anywhere,
Only go with me.
Lay any burden on me,
Only sustain me.
Sever any tie but the tie
That binds me to Yourself."
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Heather King tackled the things that holds all of us back-- our insecurity and fears.

What if we really can't do the things we feel we are called to? Maybe God made a mistake? Maybe I misunderstood Him? Or, even sometimes we question if we are doing enough. And I love that she works through each excuse..or what we deem "reasons" for our "inability".

I've struggled with my insecurity in regards to what I feel that God is leading me towards--it terrifies me and I feel ill-equipped. Reading the section on the burning bush and Moses gave me a new perspective. I don't know if this would be considered a spoiler or not but she points out that Moses missed the fact that God was using a bush to communicate with Moses. God used something as insignificant and unassuming as a bush--surely He could use Moses. And He did.

Surely He can do the same with me... and you, if we are just willing. And that is what King asks us to be--willing.
I also appreciate that she touches on the idea of feeling like the things that God is calling you to--that the things that you are doing, are less than. That idea is something that is not touched on or spoken on enough.
Bravo, Heather King!

At the end of each chapter we are also provided questions that match each chapter-- making this book beneficial for reading alone or working through with a group.

I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review.
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