You Bring the Distant Near

Pub Date   |   Archive Date 12 Sep 2017

Member Reviews

A truly inspiring story. Beautifully written. An amazing creation.
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Multiple reasons why I really liked this book: - The premise: Spans countries and multiple generations of women with epic family drama throughout - what else do I need? - The characters: Perfectly developed, realistic with a strong sense of individuality. Ranee was the epitome of a typical desi mom and Sonia, oh my god, writer, reader and literary fangirl - how could I resist all this relatability? Tara (Starry) though, was the most realistic, especially in her high school phase where she puts on different masks and pretends to be someone she's not to blend in, the struggle of becoming American 'properly'. I think every young adult whose family migrated to another country can relate and...

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I had very few problems with this novel. The first is that I wish it had been longer so that I could have had more time with each of the characters. The second is that I wish it hadn't ended. I really loved seeing each of the women evolve in their lives along with the times. While the skipping through the years did require filling in the blanks a few times, it was easy enough to follow what each character had been up to in the meantime. I really enjoyed this one.
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I love the family aspects in the story. Family relationships are one of my favorite things to read about, and I loved seeing the multi-generational aspect in You Bring the Distant Near. Seeing each generation bringing something to the story was a nice way to make sure every character was relevant, without overtaking anyone else. I also liked getting to see and Indian American family, and seeing their culture beautifully incorporated into the book..
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PLOT You Bring the Distant Near truly felt like a gift I was unwrapping Christmas morning. It’s not often that we get stories based on Indian culture yet here we have a multi-generational book spanning the lives of 5 women in the Das family. We first meet Ranee & Rajeev Das, the parents of Tara & Sonia Das as they move from Bangladesh to London & finally Queens, New York. Rajeev Das is a hard worker & provider for his family, his wife Ranee wants them to own a beautiful home in a safe neighborhood. The Das family has very humble beginnings in a apartment in Queens that is located in a predominantly black neighborhood. We see Ranee struggle with her own prejudices & how her fear leads...

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I really loved this book. It takes place over 2 generations, first through the 70's then through early 2000's, with a bit of their mother/grandmother thrown in to break up the two generations. It's a lovely story about Indian immigrants who move from London to the US. They simply try to survive, but when their father dies, the women of the family break from tradition. Sonia marries an African American that her mother doesn't approve of while Tara marries the man that her family was trying to arrange a marriage for the two of them, but because she fell for him. Instead of letting male family members honor their father, they do, Sonia cutting off her hair while Tara returns her father's ashes...

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This was a very interesting cultural look at India and that multigenerational family. What values do the past generation hold more importantly than the new one. The one that believes in feminism and marrying for love. And how does that generation raise the next. I loved it. Beautiful language and great information on the Indian culture
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This was a greatly written book told in good prose which delved into the heart of the meaning of race and ancestory.
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Where am I from? Can the answer be stories and words, some of theirs, some of mine? Why is no one talking about this book?? If you've marked this book as to read you need to get on it asap because it's such a beautiful novel. You Bring the Distant Near follows the lives of five Indian women, three generations, from West Africa to London and to America and India. We get a glimpse into the lives of Indian women who have settled in America to live the American Dream. This book deals with cultural and race issues with five very strong and different women in the forefront. Although this book does include love interests they never take the limelight. "You read her diary! That's...

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Told in alternating voices over three generations, You Bring the Distant Near follows the immigration of the Das family from Ghana to London to NYC in the 1970s. Tara and Sonia are excited to embrace the American way of life, whereas their mother Ranee has traditional Indian expectations of her daughters. However, Tara's interest in acting and Sonia's social activism are encouraged by their father. Twenty years later Tara is a Bollywood star and Sonia is a New York reporter married to her African American high school love. Their daughters Anna and Chantal, echo their mothers' ideals and ultimately bring their grandmother around to a new way of thinking. Nominated for the 2017 National...

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This book is amazing. The book follows the lives of an Indian family, specifically the daughters of a Bengali couple. Starry and Sunni are in high school, and have just moved to the US from London, following their father who has landed a job in New York. The book follows the girls throughout the 1960s and 70s, then in 1996 picks up the story of their daughters. You Bring the Distant Near gripped me from the beginning. I don’t know a lot about Indian culture and I feel like this was a great glimpse into beautiful, even if somewhat controversial, culture. The story is easy to follow because of how it is presented and even the passage of time moves seamlessly. So much happens throughout the...

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In You Bring the Distant Near, Mitali Perkins created a beautiful story of family, love and identity. Sonia, a writer and reader, mentions Little Women on more than one occasion. I can’t help but make comparisons. These women have so much love for each other and they show that as they work through their individual challenges. The relationships of Sonia, Tara and their mother Ranee are the primary focus of more than half of the book. These young women and their mother share many things like genes, culture, and having adapted to multiple countries over time. This is the magic of families. We often share so much, but our personalities and individual experiences shape us and our identities...

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You Bring the Distant Near is a family story told in three parts, each covering a different time in the lives of five women. Part One begins with a move. After living in Ghana and then London for a number of years, Rajeev Das gets a job in New York and moves his family, wife Ranee, daughters Tara and Sonia, into an apartment in Flushing, Queens. Though her daughters adjust to life in Flushing, Ranee is distrustful of the black kids who live in the neighborhood and wants to move. After a year in Queens, they move into a house in Ridgeford, New Jersey. Renee tries to hold on the some customary Bengali traditions, but her daughters quickly assimilate to life as Americans. Tara, the...

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This was unexcepted and lovely. I adore a book that created real women with warts and all. I also like that it does t buy into traditional tropes.
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A hauntingly beautiful book about three generations of women and their experiences in the United States. Born in India but spent most of their lives in London, new immigrants Tara and Sonia embrace American culture even while their mother Ranee struggles with her new American life. Spanning the years 1973-2006 and giving insight from three generations of women in the same family, You Bring the Distant Near covers first love, families, cultural identity and what each generation struggles to keep cultural connections or let them go. All five women have a strong and distinct voice and you can't help but fall in love with the Das family as you read this book.
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Hello, fellow book lovers of the world and welcome to my latest blog. This blog is about Mitali Perkins Book, "You Bring the Distant Near". I originally received this book as an E Arc from Netgalley but somehow it was misplaced so I could not review it. So I decide to purchase the book from Amazon on September 25 and was just now able to get to reading it. So now on to the summary and my final thoughts on the book. This book is a story five generations of Indian women from India. We first meet Ranee, her daughters Tara and Sonia. They take us on a journey of leaving India, then Britain to go to America. The Das family decides that America will be their final home. This is hard on Ranee...

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You Bring the Distant Near is a lovely story about 3 generations of Bengali woman and how moving to the United States has shaped their lives. I really liked how we saw all five characters at different points in their life throughout the book. The author did a really good job of developing the characters and making you feel connected to them. This story was really sweet and I would recommend.
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Me and this book just aren’t friends. I have a lot to say about this. I ended up not finishing it. I don’t know if it was because it was a contemporary which isn’t my favorite genre, or it just wasn’t a very fascinating one. I basically lost all momentum and desire to finish this. I think what was happening was that I was trying to convince myself to live and finish this book that it just left me unsatisfied. That’s not to say this was a bad book! It’s extremely diverse, deals with great, hard topics, and I’m sure this book will mean a lot to a lot of people. It just wasn’t for me. I found the overall storyline to just be dull and totally left me uninterested. I thought the characters were...

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