You Bring the Distant Near

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 12 Sep 2017

Member Reviews

Follow 3 generations of women as they navigate new American life and all that comes with it; love, friendships, loss, and more.

Ranee is finding it hard to adjust to life in America. Bengal is her home, and even though she and her daughters have lived in many places, America is so different from anything she has ever known. Her daughters, Tara and Sonia, are adjusting to life in a new place; Sonia finds solace in her local library, while Tara learns to fit in by emulating Marcia Brady. Each girl has her own secret aspirations, ones that their very traditional mother finds hard to understand at times. Flash forward and Tara and Sonia are now young adults with their own new set of...

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Sadly, this is one of my DNF pile. I tried so hard to give this a chance but to no avail.
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You Bring the Distant Near is a multi-generational read that centers around the complexities of navigating multiple cultures, the immigrant experience, and understanding the different generations. While it doesn't offer anything new to the common motif in immigrant stories, it does a nice job in highlighting the importance of finding ones home despite where you are in the world.
The story opens in 1970s New York, where the Das family has immigrated from England in hopes of planting roots and finding acceptance. Sisters Tara and Sonia are two teen girls who crave personal freedom and they often go against their mother Ranee's strict and traditional Indian values. Older sister...

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My review can be seen at RT Book Reviews.
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You Bring The Distant Near by Mitali Perkins 100% deserves all the praise. IT IS SO GOOD. Also, it deserves all kinds of attention. I can’t say for sure if it has been getting attention on the bookish internets because I’ve really just been holed up disconnected, reading all the books and hanging with my kiddo instead of engaging. Anyways, You Bring The Distant Near is the second book I’ve read by Perkins (see: Bamboo People) but now I know FOR SURE I AM GOING TO READ HER OTHER BOOKS. And get all shouty because I get shouty about things that are good.

Perkins’ latest book follows basically six characters. It opens up with a swim meet when character Sonia is kind of young. Then it...

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The writing style, wording, and story are absolutely beautiful. The pacing feels natural, and the issues that the story confronts are well-handled, and no dialogue ever feels stilted or forced. "You Bring the Distant Near" is easily a favorite with its clever characters and lovely writing.
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Excerpt from Review: "... I was surprised when I finally realized that You Bring the Distant Near was actually a teen novel.  Sure, the story is told through the eyes of the girls as teenagers, but we do see some things through the eyes of Ranee Das as well (toward the end, anyway) and the subject matter is not just kid stuff, though teen novels rarely are these days.  I suppose what I am trying to say is that Mitali Perkins’ writing is so captivating and her characters are so real and likeable, that this book is enjoyable for people of any age, including myself (and I’m far…ahem…maybe not too far…from being a teenager)..."
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Did not finish -wasn't was I was expecting. Not bad, just not in my interests.
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I'm actually not posting a review of this book on my blog or goodreads, due to the fact that this book was a DNF for me. It was no fault of the book itself, it just turns out that this didn't really line up with my reading tastes. I will say I really enjoyed the writing style for what I did read, but I've just been sitting on this ARC for months and could never get into it. I'm really sorry about that.
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This wonderful book is based on Indian culture. It is a multi-generational book spanning the lives of 5 women in the one family. We follow them as they try to acclimate to American culture and find find their identities. I feel it is an important read to get a glimpse inside another culture.
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A truly inspiring story. Beautifully written. An amazing creation.
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Multiple reasons why I really liked this book:
- The premise: Spans countries and multiple generations of women with epic family drama throughout - what else do I need?
- The characters: Perfectly developed, realistic with a strong sense of individuality. Ranee was the epitome of a typical desi mom and Sonia, oh my god, writer, reader and literary fangirl - how could I resist all this relatability? Tara (Starry) though, was the most realistic, especially in her high school phase where she puts on different masks and pretends to be someone she's not to blend in, the struggle of becoming American 'properly'. I think every young adult whose family migrated to another country...

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I had very few problems with this novel. The first is that I wish it had been longer so that I could have had more time with each of the characters. The second is that I wish it hadn't ended. I really loved seeing each of the women evolve in their lives along with the times. While the skipping through the years did require filling in the blanks a few times, it was easy enough to follow what each character had been up to in the meantime. I really enjoyed this one.
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I love the family aspects in the story. Family relationships are one of my favorite things to read about, and I loved seeing the multi-generational aspect in You Bring the Distant Near. Seeing each generation bringing something to the story was a nice way to make sure every character was relevant, without overtaking anyone else. I also liked getting to see and Indian American family, and seeing their culture beautifully incorporated into the book..
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PLOT

You Bring the Distant Near truly felt like a gift I was unwrapping Christmas morning. It’s not often that we get stories based on Indian culture yet here we have a multi-generational book spanning the lives of 5 women in the Das family. We first meet Ranee & Rajeev Das, the parents of Tara & Sonia Das as they move from Bangladesh to London & finally Queens, New York. Rajeev Das is a hard worker & provider for his family, his wife Ranee wants them to own a beautiful home in a safe neighborhood. The Das family has very humble beginnings in a apartment in Queens that is located in a predominantly black neighborhood. We see Ranee struggle with her own prejudices & how...

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I really loved this book. It takes place over 2 generations, first through the 70's then through early 2000's, with a bit of their mother/grandmother thrown in to break up the two generations. It's a lovely story about Indian immigrants who move from London to the US. They simply try to survive, but when their father dies, the women of the family break from tradition. Sonia marries an African American that her mother doesn't approve of while Tara marries the man that her family was trying to arrange a marriage for the two of them, but because she fell for him. Instead of letting male family members honor their father, they do, Sonia cutting off her hair while Tara...

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This was a very interesting cultural look at India and that multigenerational family. What values do the past generation hold more importantly than the new one. The one that believes in feminism and marrying for love. And how does that generation raise the next. I loved it. Beautiful language and great information on the Indian culture
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This was a greatly written book told in good prose which delved into the heart of the meaning of race and ancestory.
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