Rosie Colored Glasses

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 20 Mar 2018

Member Reviews

Seeing a mother's struggle with mental illness and addiction through the eyes of her daughter is both heartwarming and breaking, and so very very honest.
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This novel was slow to pull me in but it felt very real.  Willow's s mother is a free spirit which seems wonderful but it is attached to her mental illness. Willow's father is not as expressive as her mother but he is reliable and there.  It was heart breaking to read Willow's thoughts and emotions but in the end, very satisfying.
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Trigger warning for suicide and drug abuse.

I wanted to love this book so much. But it just didn't work for me.

The story is told from 2 different perspectives. We hear from Willow, the daughter of Rosie and Rex, as she struggles with having to go between her parents now that they are divorced. We also hear from Rosie and Rex when they first met and how they fell in love with each other. I really liked that we had these two perspectives because they made for a very interesting and well-rounded story. 

I think that the issues this novel explores are very interesting and deep, and deserve to be mentioned. It is definitely a sad and moving story. 

But the novel left me wanting more. 
...

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Willow is only 11 when her parents are divorced. The vastly differing parenting styles are explained as Rosie's manic side is revealed. It's a heavy subject and I wished I had liked it better.
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Rosie is an Asshole. Rosie has some serious issues. Rosie is the reason I kept reading this book.

This turned out to be a very sad tale and I felt so bad for Rosie. My afternoon with her was perplexing, wonderful, sad and very entertaining.

I can't say anymore without giving anything away. I can't do that. You need to read it. I will say that I did shed tears while reading this. A lot of tears.

Thanks to Harlequin (US & Canada) and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.
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Eleven-year-old Willow hates that her parents are divorced. She hates that she and her brother have two separate lives: one filled with rules and sternness when they’re with their father, Rex; and one filled with laughter and crazy rituals when they’re with their mother, Rosie.

Willow knows how much her mother loves her. Every Spaghetti Sunday, late-night room-painting endeavor, or costumed reenactment of Rocky Horror Picture Show proves it. Her father just yells or gives her more lists to follow. Why can’t she live with her mother all the time?

Then her mother’s behavior changes, and Willow finds herself waking up at her father’s house when she’d fallen asleep at her mother’s. Her...

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Unfortunately I had issues with opening this on adobe.
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By the end of the first chapter, I knew that this book would not be quite as advertised. I somehow missed the whimsical part of this story, but it is definitely a heartbreaking and uplifting story. 

It's beautifully crafted and touches on love, relationships, the effect of drugs on a family and a variety of other issues. I would definitely recommend this book.
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I absolutely loved everything about Rosie Colored Glasses. I loved the characters, i loved the story, and I loved the almost fairytale like writing. It is at times both heart breaking and heart lifting.

The main characters are Rosie - so exuberant and full of life, except when she isn’t. Rex - her husband, almost the exact opposite of Rosie. Their two children, Willow and Asher. Willow plays heavily in the story, Asher less so because he is so young.

The story of this family is told in two time frames. We learn from Rosie and Rex, how they met and fell in love. Then in the current time frame we follow Rosie, Rex and Willow.

When Rex and Rosie meet, Rex is almost overwhelmed...

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Here is a review by Jennifer: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2323742338
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This novel tears you up inside - every word about Willow just broke my heart. Her mother, Rosie, is the force of nature in the story, and Wolfson unfolds the details of Rosie's mental illness - her exhilarating mania and her gut-hollowing depression - and addiction in a steady, methodical way via snippets of past and present, like a slow-motion trainwreck. Rex, Willow's father, affects her in a different way due to his inability to let go of control and his selfish unwillingness to try just a little harder for his daughter. He comes around eventually, but it's so frustrating that it takes such a profound tragedy to do so. This whole story is a big reminder that you never know...

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A fabulous read dealing with the most strenuous issues including post partum depression , drug addiction, and sadly parental alienation.
When you watch someone self destruct from an addiction it's not something anyone takes lightly as countless lives are affected by one's choices and those choices have dire consequences .
Rosie and Rex seemed to live a life of envy until you learn that their two kids are being neglected do to the mother's hidden drug use and abuse of vicodin.
Rosie has lapsed into being an unfit parent and Rex is forced to make a terrible choice his wife or his two kids.
Either way I cannot imagine the heartache in knowing your wife is stoned and...

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This was a well written exploration into a love story that likely never should have worked, and when it becomes apparent that it isn't going to,, the aftereffects it has on the two young children. Willow and her brother Asher go back and forth between their two parents houses. Both parents have completely opposite styles, which only ends up confusing the children more. Their mom becomes the fun parent, the one that older child Willow wants to be with always, and their father the one with all the rules While this can perhaps work in a two parent family, it goes awry when sides become drawn. The book is told in alternating chapters, one from daughter Willow's viewpoint, and the...

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I tried several times, but could not get into this book and finally abandoned it about half way through. I just did not like any the characters.
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This one just wasn't for me. Even though the text was written in a barebones style I still felt myself struggling to get through it. The characters were generally intriguing but the plot was just a sort of predictable and basic portrayal of postpartum depression and drug addiction and mental illness that I don't think added anything to the vast array of books on these topics. I skim read the last 100 pages or so, because I had already commited enough time to it to want to finish it and mark it as read, but I wouldn't have lost any enjoyment in it whatsoever if I DNF'ed.
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Books was amazing. A tear jerker all the way through. A father-daughter  and Mother-Daughter relationship of miss communications an assumptions that many can relate to.
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{My Thoughts}
What Worked For Me
Love that Couldn’t Last – I really liked the relationship between Rosie and Rex. It would be difficult to find two people more different from one another. Rosie was romantic, dazzling, ditsy, quick to smile, but she also had trouble keeping a job and maintaining focus. Rex was steady, efficient, strong, but he was impatient and struggled with affection. Both Rosie and Rex knew they were too different for their love to last. Yet, they couldn’t stop themselves from moving forward with the love they shared. Wolfson did a really nice job juxtaposing their personalities and their feelings about the other.

“By Rosie’s definition of love, she loved Rex very...

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A very moving and timely story of a family dealing with the fallout from mental health and addiction issues. The titular Rosie is an ebullient, force of nature with, as we see from the first pages, serious boundary issues. While her life with few rules and much love sees her as a relatively functional single adult, her marriage and parenting are harmed by her choices and behavior. Rex, an uptight, straight-laced and success-driven man falls in love with Rosie only to have her nature, so opposite and foreign to his own, cause chaos in his life. But it's not cute, romantic chaos. Imagine that you finally learn to love and your love unhinges everything, including the lives of your...

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I had a feeling I would love Rosie Colored Glasses. It's the story about a mentally ill mother with the story telling coming from the 5th grader, this sounded right up my alley. What I didn't expect was to have such fierce love for the father and brother, not to mention I never thought I'd find myself wiping so many tears from my face, I mean I was sobbing. The tears aren't because it's a heartbreaking story, I read plenty of those without tears but because the writing is so creative and so beautiful you are completely immersed in the story. 

I can not recommend this book enough!!!!
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The one sure thing about this novel is that it's sad. I usually like the going back and forth between present and past, but this time it didn't help very much. It made the novel more difficult to piece together that it already was.
Rosie Thorpe, mother to two children, Asher and Willow, and ex-wife to Rex, suffers of mental illness. I honestly didn't know what that illness was. She was depressed, this I understood. She was a very energetic and happy person, marching to the beat of her own drum. Obviously, this proved to bring trouble long term, especially because her husband, Rex was the very opposite. Willow, their oldest child, is the one who suffers the most after their...

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