Love, Hate and Other Filters

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 01 Feb 2018

Member Reviews

3.5/5 stars

Maya is an Indian-Muslim senior in high school who wants to be a filmmaker. She tries to do her best by her parents, but when a terrorist attack attack happens in the big city to their suburb, her parents --in their concern for her and her safety-- tighten the rather loose strings of freedom (for desi immigrant parents, anyway). Maya feels so constricted by the strings that she lashes out and the consequences lead to a very difficult decision.

I appreciated and enjoyed the peek into Maya's culture. Although her family isn't very strict in their Islamic faith, it does hold some sway over the family, especially when confronted with danger. Additionally, it is so...

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A needed voice in YA literature today and well deserving of all the attention it is getting. Review to be posted on Goodreads and Litsy!
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eh? It was fine, if it need of an editor. Maya is the only Indian and Muslim girl in her midwestern town. A good daughter who's willing to make nice with the boys her parents introduce her to, even though she's hoping to go off to New York to film school instead of becoming a lawyer and marrying a nice Muslim boy like her parents want. And then there's Phil, the cute white boy in her class who she's had a crush on for years. Her story is intercut with scenes of an anonymous terrorist planning an attack: we're not told who he is, or what his motive is, but it won't be that surprising. The story-telling gets muddled following the attack, and it feels like Ahmed...

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3.5 stars

Second-generation Indian immigrant Maya experiences the highs and lows of American high school life while enduring the additional struggle of being Muslim in the midst of an islamaphobic event. 

This is a great primer for teens and new young adult readers who want to delve into tough topics and current events like abuse, discrimination and immigration. There were often times where I thought that Maya’s typical high school boy trouble dulled the more serious plot lines in the book, but on the whole I thought it was a great example of writing for present day teens. 

For fans of: coming-of-age stories, current events, film, secluded beaches
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DNF

I was expecting more from this book. It was all romance... I stopped at 50%. I just didn’t care about Maya quite as much... nothing seemed to be happening.  I like the idea of it, but the execution was done poorly.
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So this is being compared to The Hate U Give and I can totally see the comparisons. Both feature POC protagonists struggling against there heritage and American part of their life. And both are facing a huge tragedy. Unfortunately I found The Hate U give to be a much better book. It has more passion and daring and found it speaks to a lot of what is happening in America. Love, Hate and other filters is not a bad book.
Love, Hate and Other Filters is told from the point of view of Maya she is just your average teen wanting to date and kiss boy and work on her photography. Unfortunately her parents are very strict and want her to follow traditional ideals. But after a bombing hits and one...

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I wasn't sure what to expect when I first started reading. The description looked like it could fall anywhere from a teen romance (with more diverse characters) to a book with real social commentary. The end result falls somewhere in between. Samira Ahmed does a beautiful job bringing to life Maya an American teen born to Indian-Muslim parents who is trying to navigate what she wants out of life and her parents dreams for her. Ultimately a nearby terrorist attack, and ensuing hate crimes put everything into stark focus as Maya and her parents each deal with events in their own way. While readers may not see the romance as a happy ending, those elements ultimately help Maya to find her...

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I often tell our students that reading a book can give them a unique opportunity to walk in someone else’s shoes. Books can teach you a lot about people, places and cultures; “Love, Hate and Other Filters” is one of those books. This book has many facets, one being, it is your typical YA coming of age romance with fun and silly times. Yet at the heart of it, there is a story about prejudice and what it is like to grow up a Muslim American teen in a time where Islamophobia is real. Maya lives the life of a typical American teenage girl except when she is sometimes a target of hate because of her religion. A little stereotypical at times, I still feel this book is relatable to anyone that has...

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I cannot rave enough about this book. It takes the typical teenage girl coming-of-age story and turns it on its head. Protagonist Maya is torn between her parents' expectations and her own dreams. She handles this dichotomy with grace and maturity, while still coming across as a "real" teenage girl. The race and religion prejudices Maya faces in her community and in the USA as a whole are very relevant to what young Indian and Muslim teens face today. I loved how she chose to maintain her identity apart from the expectations of her friends, family, or even outsiders. Four and a half stars!
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I am thrilled to have a book like this on the YA market. The perspective offered by Maya is one that isn't seen in enough teen literature, and it is handled quite well. The idea of being persecuted because of an arbitrary similarity, like a last name, is something that would absolutely happen in a high school. I did feel there was almost a split in the narrative that made this read like two connected stories rather than one novel. Maya's story transitions very quickly for one all about living a dual-culture existence and being in love with a boy from a different culture to one of persecution based on religion and race. It felt somewhat unsettling as a reader, but the...

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While i like this book and believe it is a first for the portrayal of Muslim characters i have some concerns. This book took a serious topic/underlying story regarding hate and Islamophobia and in some ways almost disregarded it. What could have been an amazing book got lost in a love story and often undermined Islamic beliefs. Drinking wine is just as frowned upon as drinking alcohol....So for me i can only give it 3 stars...
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**I received a copy of this title in exchange for an honest review.**

Maya is stuck between two worlds. Does she become the obedient daughter her parents want her to be or does she pursue her dreams of becoming a famous filmmaker? Does she stick with Kareem (the dreamy guy her parents try to hook her up with) or is it Phil (the cute athlete that would not be on the approved list) that makes her heart beat faster?

Interspersed between chapters we see the inner workings of a hate crime unfolding that will have far reaching effects on Maya and her small town.

As I'm not Muslim, I can't speak to that part of Maya's experience. I can however, relate to the issues that living...

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ARC provided by NetGalley.

Higher than 3 stars but not quite a 4. This was a fun, frothy romance with an unexpected twist about halfway through. That, and the unique lens of this book (a Muslim/Indian teenager growing up in a rural town), gives this book some freshness, even if the second half can occasionally veer into melodrama. For a first time author, this book is well written and well plotted, with a believable romance, a strong leading character, and an interesting dynamic with her parents (though I wish the consequences of her choice to move to NYC was lingered on more, it went right from her parents kicking her out of the house to possibly forgiving her a few months later, it...

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My students loved "The Hate U Give" and I'm so excited to share "Love, Hate, and Other Filters" with them! There is a dearth of Muslim voices in YA lit, so this is an especially needed novel for the genre.  I found the story to be timely and thought-provoking, especially when her family falls victim to Islamophobia and racism.  Maya's story may not ring true for all readers, but the themes are universal and the conversations this novel should spark are of the moment for all.
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One of the most powerful and relateable coming-of-age stories I’ve read, Love, Hate, & Other Filters is simultaneously a cute, tender love story - while also being a searing and real look at what it’s like to be a young Muslim in (North) America.

Unfortunately too relatable - I loved how Ahmed painted a vivid picture of the everyday anxieties of being a Muslim in today’s world, and I loved her unflinching (but pretty well rounded) portrayal of Maya’s parents. Their anxieties and fears, and their conviction to stick to the values and expectations they grew up in is all too relatable for many first and second generation immigrants.

At its core, this was a story about a young (Indian...

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The dialogue early in the book feels a little stilted, but the raw emotions of the characters and their relationships with one another make this a great read.
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Maya is an Indian Muslim navigating life in middle America. No one looks like her and many make assumptions about her. Maya's family has already decided her future, but she refuses to conform to society and her family's expectations. Maya wants to become a film director and possibly fall in love. Maya has applied to a prestigious college, where she can develop her film making, but her parents don't know yet. Also, she has met and begun a potential relationship with the perfect Indian boy, but her long-time crush is starting to finally show an interest as well. Maya is growing into her own and it is difficult for anyone to know what her ultimate choices will be.

I loved the...

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This books was kind of a mix between the romance and Indian aspects of When Dimple Met Rishi and the social justice and racism aspects of The Hate U Give. I had some pretty mixed feelings on the books, but ended up giving it 4 stars on Goodreads.

What I liked
Diversity
I love that this is an Own Voices book and that there are more books being written about Indian and Muslim teens. I am neither Muslim nor Indian, so I can’t vouch for how well Ahmed represented the cultures, but from an outsider’s point of view I think she did a great job of bringing in a culture that isn’t in most young adult books. Ahmed addressed real issues that the typical white character doesn’t have to worry about...

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LOVE, HATE AND OTHER FILTERS by Samira Ahmed will soon be on our shelves. It is a brand new young adult novel which looks at both following a dream and coping with bigotry. At one point, high school student Maya Aziz says, "All I want is to make movies and kiss a boy." For parts of the story, she does focus on those activities, often describing how she would light or frame a movie scene. And she chooses between two boys, Kareem, a college student who shares her culture and is acceptable to her family, and Phil, the high school football star who loves nature and wants to be an EMT. Sadly and all too realistically, she also has to deal with hate crimes, especially after there is a...

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Maya is in her final year of high school in a small American town. She is quiet and often hides behind her video camera which she employees to make documentaries. She'd love to attend NYU for film studies though her parents expect her to follow their wishes of meeting a nice Indian boy while she attends a near by law school. Maya is torn between pleasing her parents and following her heart All these plans are thrown in turmoil when a response to a serious incident elsewhere in the country unleashes islamaphobic attacks upon the family.

Maya is your typical girl next door that you'd want your child to be friends with. She is kind and sensitive to others, smart and studies...

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