Love, Hate and Other Filters

Pub Date   |   Archive Date 01 Feb 2018

Member Reviews

Boring. Could not get past the first few pages. I hate not finishing a book but did not feel bad about not finishing this one as I could not even get started.
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YES YES YES and a thousand times YES! This book is so refreshing. I love the push for more diverse books, and this one hits all the right spots! I love the storyline and the imagery! I will be recommending this even before it comes out!
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Maya hopes to attend film school in New York City, but her plans are threatened by her parent's expectations and anti-Musilim backlash following a terrorist attack. Love, Hate, And Other Filters is witty and heartfelt and lends perspective on the second-generation Muslim-American experience. Maya's voice is realistic and her relationship with her parents and friends feel authentic. Despite a deeply satisfying conclusion, I found the novel bogged down by the love triangle that lacked chemistry and added little to the story.
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This beautiful book about a teenage Indian-American girl is just so heart-warming and lovable. What I love about this book is that while there is a LOT going on, it's not over the top. The author balanced all of the crazy things happening in Maya's life without making it sound completely unbelievable. The dialogue was perfect--none of that whiny teenage dialogue that I'm so used to in YA literature. I cannot wait to take this book to schools!
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Kudos to Ahmed for tackling racism from the POV of an Indian-American Muslim girl. There’s definitely a lot of reality and truth here, but a certain level of fantasy as few teens I know could ever be as brazen as Maya to defy their parents’ rules & expectations. YA readers from similar backgrounds will relate to Maya’s social experiences, dealing with racism, and frustrations with cultural expectations of their parents. That said, Ahmed definitely hit the mark on the types of bigotry that immigrant kiddos (and adults) frequently experience and, sadly, certainly what we are seeing more of in the U.S. these days. Put in hands of your Desi teens, especially girls will appreciate seeing...

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The first chapter or two made me think this novel was going to be pretty light and fluffy, but it ended up being much deeper and more affecting than I expected. Maya Aziz is a Muslim Indian-American trying to balance her own hopes and dreams of attending film school at NYU with her parents’ expectations that she go to college close to home and then settle down with a “suitable” Muslim boy. When a terrorist attack happens and the suspect has the same last name as Maya, she and her parents finds themselves the targets of hate crimes. Funny, touching, and important!
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This was a quick but powerful read. I loved Maya and was thrilled she had the courage to pursue her dreams no matter what.
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Thanks so much to NetGalley for the ARC of this book! This book was really good--a coming of age story about an Indian Muslim girl in the western suburbs of Chicago, where I just happen to live. Maya is an amazing character: strong, driven, independent, knows herself, stands up for and defends what she believes in. Fabulous qualities for a 17 year old. She has her shy moments, mostly around boys, but the rest of the time her character is amazingly secure. She manages to balance her American life outside of her family well with her Muslim and Indian family and traditions. Phil is super cute how he slowly shows that he likes Maya and they become closer which is where Maya has...

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I would've preferred more focus on the family interactions and less on the romance, but if I were younger, I probably would've adored the romance plot. On the flip side, if I'd been reading for the romance, i probably wouldn't have found the ending as satisfying. The characters were very well done. The twist was effective because of the way the perspective shifted in between main chapters.
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This book was really wonderful. To start with the heavier stuff, the way that Islamophobia was portrayed in this book was incredibly well handled. It all felt quite realistic both in the sense that it was not completely over the top but was also devastating and hard to read at times. Even the characters who displayed this Islamophobia were developed in such a way that you could understand them if still despise them for it. On the lighter side the character development of Maya and particularly her interactions with her family and crush(es) were incredibly well done. Some might think it's silly, but the descriptions of her home life, particularly the smells of food, really helped to...

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Love, hate, and other filters is the story of Maya, an aspiring filmmaker at a suburban high school (Batavia, Illinois) who also happens to be a Muslim Indian. She and her parents have very different ideas about her future. After a terrorist attack on a government building in Springfield and a Muslim being suspected, tensions in her town escalate. Not only does Maya become a target for retaliation, she finds her world growing smaller as her parents take away some of her options. This book tackles some big issues, like racism and cultural and generational clashes, but it also works hard to keep the story more universal, with friendship and romance and funny moments throughout. I really...

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This book is a gripping read from beginning to end. It is a clear demonstration of the writer's skill and definitely promotes an under-represented theme within YA literature. The story is told from the perspective of a young Muslim American who is smothered (figuratively!) by over-protective parents. Her dreams of attending NYU are shattered following a terrorist attack in her native Illinois. The characterisation of Maya, the main character, is consistently well-developed throughout. Her sarcastic humour is endearing - I wanted to be her friend! Her equally brilliant friend, Violet, is a creation nothing short of genius - we all need a friend like Violet in our lives! The...

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I don’t usually get into love stories, but I was so drawn in by Maya’s struggle to figure out how her wants fit into her parents’ more traditional hopes for her that by the time it really turned into a romance I was hooked. I thought the terrorist attack sub-plot felt tacked on. The book could have stood on its own without it, and I felt the chapter by chapter reveal was forced. The rest of the book was engaging and interesting, and I think that addition weakened it. I think the parts directly effecting Maya and her family could have stood alone without the heavy handed attack. All in all it was enjoyable and I would recommend it to students.
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Love, Hate & Other Filters has a lot to recommend. The main character, Maya, is an Indian Muslim American girl who has a passion for film. She struggles with her parents and their expectations as she tries to piece together her own identity. I especially liked the scenes with Maya and her family. There is love and conflict and lots of food. The relationship realistically reflects the experience most teens have with their parents, the push and pull that must occur as each of us grows into the separate and distinct person we must become. I really like how everything isn't wrapped up with a big bow. Life is messy, and Ahmed reflects that with Maya's story. I do have some other issues with...

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This title is sure to grab the attention of realistic fiction readers who enjoy the Young Adult works of Sarah Dessen and Jenny Han from the first page. Then, just as you think you're getting to the bottom of a spectacular young adult romance, the unthinkable happens and not only does Maya have to deal with high school, boys, and her strict immigrant parents, but with the same terror many young, brown, Muslim-Americans face today. Truly moving in so many ways- a must read!
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A fun read that fans of When Dimple Met Rishi or any other coming of age stories, but this one also deals with the serious issue of islamaphopia in a very heartfelt and empathetic way that will have me recommending it to many of teens.
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A fun, light read that gives a compelling voice to an important issue.
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I was so completely engrossed in Maya's story I skipped sleep and highlighted probably 70% of the book. This is a completely compelling debut novel that exposes the prejudices in America and how difficult it can be to be a teenager struggling with growing up in a conservative, traditional household. Maya is living a small town life but has big city dreams. She struggles with pleasing her parents and pursuing her own goals and ideals for her future. And then a terrorist strikes, a terrorist with the same last name as Maya. Whether it's choosing between two guys or dealing with a hate crime, the author does an outstanding job getting to the heart of the matter and exposing the raw emotions...

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This was really wonderful! The main character, Maya, is super likable. She's smart, driven, a little sarcastic, and a really believable balance between confident and insecure as she deals with first romances, negotiating her parents' expectations, and eventually some darker struggles with Islamophobia. I think it balances all the aspects of the story really well- the low-key everyday stuff, the frankly adorable romance, and the more serious issues. This book is unique in the fact that it's an #ownvoices book that's by and about an Indian American Muslim woman, and I think it's one of the reasons the Islamophobia is handled so well here (the other reason being that Samira Ahmed is just a...

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Equal parts cute and heartbreaking, Love, Hate & Other Filters was a beautiful read. I really loved Maya's dedication to film-making and it was really nice to get to view the world through her lens (listen, I needed to make that pun, okay. I HAD to). The conflict she felt at choosing between her own personal dreams and her parent's ideas of what she should do, both for financial stability and for her own safety, was so fraught and handled with such care. The suicide bomber plotline happened a lot later in the plot than I thought it would, which really helped set up her neighborhood and her feelings of betrayal, I thought. My only tiny complaint is the pacing felt off, especially right at...

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