Artemis

Pub Date   |   Archive Date 14 Feb 2018

Member Reviews

More like Ocean's Eleven than The Martian but still a 4 star read!

The only similarity between Artemis and The Martian is the main character's inventive use of science to solve their problems. Jazz is a smuggler on Artemis, the sole city on the moon. She is whip smart but just wants to get rich quick with minimal work. When an opportunity presents itself, Jazz is in. Jazz needs to use all her resources including her intelligence to complete her well-paying scam.

The planning and execution of Jazz' plan is fascinating due to the use of real science to achieve her goal. Jazz is a great character that feels genuinely different for a caper plot. Some of the science is...

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Likeable and engaging characters that are very true to life. Love the location the details and all the science facts.
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Like so many others, I eagerly anticipated Andy Weir's new book, Artemis, because I was such a huge fan of The Martin. Unfortunately, this book was painful to read for me.

I found the evolution of Weir's first novel to be fascinating—if anyone is unfamiliar, he posted chapters on a website, gained a following and folks would give him feedback/correct his science. Artemis could have seriously used this form of collaborative editing.

In the musical, Urinetown, there's a song called "Too Much Exposition," which states, "nothing can kill a show like too much exposition." That applies to novels, too. The strange breaking of the fourth wall, meaning the main...

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Since I thoroughly enjoyed The Martian, I expected Artemis to be as enjoyable or even more so. Unfortunately, nothing about the novel worked for me and I ended up bailing on it at the halfway point. Given my love for The Martian I will definitely try more of Weir's work, hoping that his next book lives up to the promise of his first.

Thank you to NetGalley and Crown Publishing for the opportunity to read an ARC of this book.
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Artemis is one of those books that had a tremendous amount of potential to be extraordinary, but in the end fell short of expectation, bordering that fine line of bad and mediocre.

The facet that interested me the most about this novel was the fact that it takes place on the moon. I love reading novels about lunar colonies and how a society functions on the moon. As someone who enjoyed The Martian quite a lot, I was eager to dive into this work and experience a lot of the science, as well as the economic and societal functions, pertaining to living in such an environment, however. There was significant lack of world-building, and whatever information we receive about the specific setting...

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It is inevitable to compare Andy Weir latest novel Artemis to his previous best seller The Martian.

I loved the Martian. I read that book in one sitting. I loved Mark’s humor in the face of hopelessness, I loved how the secondary characters worked to bring him home.

I loved the setting of Artemis. I loved the idea of living on the moon. I loved how it’s commercialized, a resort for the rich.

I loved the plot, the idea of a moon heist.

I didn’t love the main character Jazz. It felt like Mark Whatney in a dress. Although she’s a woman, more specifically a woman of color, she has the thoughts and humor of a guy.

The plot of Artemis is lacking, and it’s secondary characters blend...

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Artemis was a fun and intelligent read. The descriptions and world building were great. Jazz was sarcastic and unlikable for most of the story, but she was also noble and heroic.
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I enjoyed this book quite a bit. I did get a bit lost in all the science, I also thought the female voice was just a bit off. That said, I was interested in the plot, setting and characters. I thought the book was well paced and a fun read!  Thank you for the advance copy.
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Jazz Bashara is a 20-something that has lived on the moon in the only lunar settlement of Artemis since she was 6 years old. Being equal parts intelligent and rebellious, she finds her calling in smuggling goods into the small city. When she is hired not to smuggle but for some secretive sabotage, she finds herself in the middle of a plot bigger than she imagined in a play for political and economic power in Artemis.

It is hard to not compare this book to The Martian, Andy Weir's amazing debut novel. The same hard science fiction aspects came into play in this book that made The Martian so good. However, Artemis has a little bit more of a complex plot. Mark Watney's mission was...

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Confession: I never read The Martian.

I’m not really sure why. It hit all my must read buttons. It just never made it to my must read pile.

And I saw the movie. My rule is always read the book first. But, if you don’t read the book first, don’t go back and read it after, especially if you liked the movie. It never works.

So, when I had a chance to read Artemis, I balked a bit – because I hadn’t read Andy Weir’s first book and I hate being a bandwagon jumper. But I read the blurb and had to dive in.

And it was SO WORTH IT!

Jazz Bashara is the type of young woman who drives the mother in me crazy, but also the type of young woman I wish I had been. Brash. Brave. Smart. Funny. I imagine...

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I absolutely adore The Martian by Andy Weir so I was super excited for this newest book of his. The worldbuilding in this is great! I really loved that part of it while I was reading it. I'm not sure I can exactly articulate why it wasn't keeping my attention. It has that same enjoyable atmosphere as The Martian and lots of interesting science. I think the biggest thing was that I wasn't enjoying the characters as much as I did Mark Watney's character. I'm hoping it was just me being not in the mood for a character like Jazz so I'm going to try it again later. Several of my really good blogging friends ended up enjoying it so my fingers are crossed that...

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If humans ever had to colonize the moon - or simply really wanted to - I think Andy Weir might be able to tell us what to do. His imagining of Artemis, the first city on the moon actually makes sense and, at least seems like, it could work.

This book gives me answers to questions I didn't even know to ask. (But I am sure someone reading it would have.) So, while I couldn't have known to questions those elments of how living on the moon works, knowing how makes it that much

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A review in spanish:
 https://dreamsofelvex.blogspot.com/2017/12/artemisa-andy-weir.html
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Overall, an enjoyable science fiction story, but with flaws. A criminal caper set in space, it had Firefly-esque moments and kept me guessing how it would turn out. However, the characters were not fully developed and the narration relied too much on information blurting rather than natural exposition of important details. And, I was irritated by the secondary characters judgmental and stereotypical reactions to Jazz's sex life; this seemed to be intended as a humorous theme and it did not work.
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Internally Consistent, and Very Entertaining

I've been reading sci-fi for over fifty years, and have run the gamut from hard science and/or alien contact, and then through speculative fiction and on to cultural/social commentary fiction, and then to space opera, parody, dystopian nightmares and, most recently, quantum theorizing that runs anywhere from silly to bracingly thought provoking. But I've always had a special regard reserved for colonist stories, from Heinlein's early YA adventures to the latest variations on missions to Mars. Lots of those colonist books have great ideas and clever angles but it is very rare to have as deep, internally consistent, plausible and...

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Artemis by Andy Weir, is his followup novel to his mega-popular and spectacular debut, The Martian. Maintaining the ex- rocket scientist’s knowledge of physics and engineering, and how things should really work in outer space, Artemis follows the adventures (or misadventures) of Jasmine Bashara —- called Jazz by her friends —- on the only city on the Moon, which is called Artemis. Weir makes Jazz, a Saudi woman born and raised on the Moon, as the protagonist and narrator of this book. The novel starts with a quick introduction with a lot of action, in which Jazz is revealed to be a smuggler who brings in much needed items for the general population of the city at a price that is more...

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First things first, I considered Weir's second book as good as "The Martian."

I've read some reviews where people complained about characterization problems, but this didn't stop me from enjoying the book and considering the heroine refreshingly funny in her tomboy flawed way.
As a Brazilian, I also found a couple of details in the ARC I would have pointed out as not so really Brazilian, so I wonder if these details were later changed in the final version of the book. 

In any case, I couldn't put this book down or stop laughing. So it's one of my favorites this year.
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In a similar take on space to his first book, Andy Weir imagines life as a culture and colony on the moon. The moon has it's own economy and that's where there is potential for crime. This is a stand alone book from The Martian, which many readers might not expect given his first book was so popular. The book was an interesting read, although the author attempts to write from the standpoint of a teenage girl, with all the hormones and exploring your identity that that entails, and I wouldn't say that is a strong skill of Mr. Weir.
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3.5/5 stars!

Jasmine Bashara is pretty much a female Mark Watney. I liked her, but she quickly got on my nerves. Luckily, the author kept things moving and I didn't have a lot of time to focus on her personality.

Jazz has been living on the moon with her father since she was 6. She's a trouble maker, she likes sex and she can weld the heck out of anything. Her relationship with her father is rather strained as he is a devout Muslim and she's a smuggler. It's expensive to live in Artemis, the moon's only city, so Jazz is always looking for opportunities to make more money. She's offered a chance to pull in the haul of a lifetime and she takes it, even though...

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