Artemis

Pub Date   |   Archive Date 14 Feb 2018

Member Reviews

Artemis by Andy Weir was an exciting ride from beginning to end. I was initially afraid that this book wouldn’t stand up to the quality of The Martian but it DID. The story line was fresh. A female smuggler on the moon? What could go wrong, eh? Jazz is a 26 year old resident of Artemis, a settlement on the Moon, and has been for the past 20 years. She works and lives in the gray area of the law. Due to her numerous connection and her intelligence, an opportunity to make money comes her way. Who could resist a little vandalism for one million slugs? In the process, Jazz ends up stirring up an organized crime syndicate and has to fight and ultimately the lives of everyone on Artemis...

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Another winner from the dude who made me want to colonize Mars! Now I want to colonize The Moon!!! The most amazing thing of all being the fact that I continue to learn from his books. I love that!!!
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Jazz lives on the moon, in a city called Artemis. Named after the moon, of course. Travel between the moon and earth is consistent, and the moon has become a vacation hot spot for people of all types, though the only ones that afford to live there year-round (other than those who work there) are filthy rich. She is a smuggler, and works offloading cargo ships as well. When one of her smuggling regulars asks her for a shady job, her first inclination is to say no. Then he names his price, and she runs with it - she has a specific goal she's saving for, and this will clear it and then some. But that's when things get crazy, and the book takes off like a rocket (put totally intended). The...

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This has good hard science, interesting problems to solve and a somewhat complex main character who is interesting to spend time with. The setting is interesting too. It's a little less kid-friendly than The Martian was (it has some sexual situations, although nothing explicit, and a bit of violence), and sometimes it feels like some of the different ethnic/racial groups get stereotyped a bit, also it feels like a male author writing a female first-person narrator sometimes. I definitely enjoyed it and hope it gets a good movie too.
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I absoluletly loved The Martian by Andy Weir so I was a bit disappointed by this book. It is by no means a bad book it just was not as great as The Martian. The characters were really strong but the story felt a bit flat to me. I do love how Andy Weir gives you on the tiny details that is something I quite enjoy. I am reviewing this book based on an ARC received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest opinion.
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Jazz is a young woman of Saudi heritage who was mostly raised on the moon by her observant Muslim father. She had a falling-out with him and is now living on her own, nonobservant in every possible way, trying to earn enough money for a comfortable existence—mostly by smuggling in high-value goods to sell to the people of Artemis, a development run by a Nigerian state/corporate partnership. When she’s offered a million slugs—a fortune—to do a small sabotage job, little does she know that it will lead to life-altering and life-threatening feats of criminal engineering, requiring her to use every relationship she has as well as her genius-level intelligence to survive. I don’t know if it will...

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In the future, humans have figured out that the moon is full of stuff we need, like aluminum and other minerals, and that people will pay good money for that and for tourism. So a little community of craftsman, engineers, sex workers, millionaires, and hospitality workers have set up shop there. Jazz is an Artemisian. She’s lived there for 20 years, in the only city on the moon. It’s a small city, but still, it’s a permanent colony up there in space. Just don’t say “in space.” She’s also a porter. At least, that’s her official title. In reality, she’s a smuggler. She operates under the noses of the official law there because she doesn’t break the laws badly enough that they elect to take...

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I love science fiction/fantasy. I love reading about different worlds and all the struggles of being in space. I mean, space is really scary if you think about it because it’s unknown and you can’t breathe without an apparatus and there’s no sound or direction or anything. It’s just floating stuff. Isn’t that crazy to think about. So it’s obvious why space lends itself to writing some really crazy novels and because it’s so unknown you can literally write an entire universe in space. For a while, I mean a long, long time, I took a break from reading science fiction. I like to read a little bit of everything, but science fiction sometimes lends a hand into my anxiety. It’s all the...

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Andy Weir's follow up novel to "The Martian" switches venues to the Moon. Artemis is long on snark, smart science, and diverse characters. There are a few plot issues regarding the main character, the mafioso's, and the governor that seem too easily wrapped up, It's a quick read, and hard to put down. At times, it's theater of the absurd, but in a good way. More fun than the Martian without losing the scientific reality.
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Andy Weir first appeared on my radar when I began seeing previews for the movie adaptation of his debut novel, The Martian. And I enjoyed that book so much that when I discovered he was coming out with Artemis, I couldn’t wait to get my hands on it! Well, I’m not sure what I expected, but this story wasn’t it. The blurb is nicely succinct and yet, I wasn’t quite prepared for what I wound up reading. Every so often, a plot twist would take the story in an entirely different direction that almost took it into another genre for me. And although I presume it’s intended to be categorized as an adult novel, this read more like a young adult to me. I haven’t seen anyone else have this opinion...

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Andy Weir's debut novel, The Martian, was one of the best science fiction novels of the past decade, so I was naturally intrigued when I heard about his new book, Artemis. On the one hand, Weir's success means that he'll likely have a much larger audience for Artemis than he initially did for The Martian, which he had to self-publish on Amazon. On the other hand, it's nearly impossible to avoid comparing Artemis to The Martian, and unfortunately that comparison does Weir's new book no favors. Artemis takes place on a lunar colony named, appropriately enough, Artemis. The book follows Jasmine "Jazz" Bashara, a bright young woman who has become the local fixer. She smuggles in contraband...

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This book has a lot of great world building and a fun read. The characters were not as strong as the ones in the Martian, but still enjoyable. Overall, a great book.
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As expected after Andy Weir's "The Martian," this was a fun story with a likable and witty main character and lots of science, both behind the scenes and right up front in the plot.
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Andy Weir's follow up to The Martian is an interesting story bogged down with too much explanation. In Artemis, humans have colonized the moon with the titular city. Jazz is a cocky, sarcastic woman who makes her money on the black market while trying to save up for more legitimate work. Her desire for money for her own home in and a better life leads he to taking out a mission that not only become dangerous to the entire population on the moon. Weir uses a lot of space to tell you things. Tell you the facts about the moon. The facts about welding on the moon. The facts about air suits on the moon. A lot of telling a very little showing. The story becomes bogged down in all the science...

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2.5 stars. Artemis is the first—and only—city on the moon. Jazz Bashara is a smart, resilient young woman who has grown up on the moon and makes a living smuggling in contraband goods. Turns out this doesn’t pay very much, so when Jazz has the opportunity to make big cash by means of a big crime, she jumps at the opportunity. Sound exciting? It should. Was it? Not really. This book was disappointing. The world building was phenomenal. Artemis felt like a real city and I loved reading about it. Its design, economy, citizens and history were well explained and made sense. It was a future not too hard to imagine. I found Jazz to be a missed opportunity. Jazz has a lot of character...

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I love the idea of this book, a thriving city on the moon! Neighborhoods under domes (to hold the oxygen of course)! There are posh resort like neighborhoods with shops, boutiques, casinos, and also blue collar neighborhoods that lack all the conveniences. The city is Artemis. There are no streets or cars, just hallways. Jazz is twenty-something and has lived in Artemis since she was 6 years old. She works as a porter, but smuggles contraband into Artemis on the side to try to get some bills paid. She is smart, clever, sarcastic, and unafraid! Jazz gets involved in a dangerous mission and the action is intense. Life on the moon can be dangerous and Jazz is about to tangle with some...

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I expected a similar book to Andy Weir’s first novel, The Martian. I could not have been more wrong. Yes, it’s set in a future where humans have reached other planets, and yes, the hero (ione), has a foul mouth, but that’s where the similarities end. Instead, you get a taut thriller with crime, political intrigue, and an engaging heroine. The fact it’s backed up with excellent science to back up the fiction is just a bonus. At this point, I plan on reading anything Andy Weir writes. He’s earned my trust and fandom.
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With Artemis, Weir has taken a fairly radical departure from his first novel, the Martian, to create his own world and his own sandbox to play in. Jasmine "Jazz" Bashara lives within the first city on the moon, Artemis. Despite enormous potential, she's a simple porter and smuggler, wanting to become wealthy, a specific number in her head whose purpose is unrevealed until the end of the novel. With her acerbic nature, she's alienated many of the people close to her, from her father to her former best friend. It takes a job offer from a wealthy client from one of the 'good' parts of the Moon to shake things up, offering a sum of money that Jazz can't refuse, even if the job itself...

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Andy Weir has done it again, another great sci-fi work for all readers.
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Artemis is the newest novel by Andy Weir (The Martian). To say I was excited about Artemis is an understatement. The Martian was a great novel, with lots of humour, that I really enjoyed so I had high hopes for Artemis. Unfortunately, I didn't like it. Artemis was well written, and I could tell that a lot of time and research went into the science side of the book, and overall the story wasn't that bad, but the main character, Jazz Bashara, ugh. I just found that she had zero redeeming qualities. It wasn't until the very very end of the book where you actually found out her motivations. Aside from my dislike of Jazz, the overall story was interesting and entertaining. This is...

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