Periods Gone Public

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 10 Oct 2017

Member Reviews

**In this post I review ASK ME ABOUT MY UTERUS and PERIODS GONE PUBLIC. Publishers have provided complementary copies to me in exchange for honest reviews** .
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Let's talk about...uteruses/uteri! Yes, those are both acceptable plural forms of 'uterus'. Half the human population has one but *wow* are they controversial! However, regardless of where you stand on hot button issues like birth control and abortion, you probably agree that periods, albeit annoying, aren't very revolutionary. But you are also probably (like me) reading this post from somewhere in the United States, you've likely had ready access to feminine hygiene products, and you have hopefully never...

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I did not read this galley in it's entirety. Though I enjoyed what I did read.
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A great read that will definitely cause some controversy! But what great read doesn't! The topic of periods and menstruation is finally getting talked about which is brilliant. It went into a lot of personal details that aren't actually so personal after all, as these are experiences shared by many women around the world.
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Just from the name of the book, I realized that it was one which was very important and deserved to be read so that I could expand my thoughts and finally catch up with all the fuss over periods, the last thing anyone in this patriarchal world ever thought would be the driving force behind beautifully organized political chaos.

Wolf’s voice from the very start was focused, salient, informative and unabashed, all things equally important to pull any reader in. To be honest, I hardly ever consciously thought about the main message that this book promotes which is perhaps why I was so inspired by it. Although, I didn’t agree with every argument that Wolf made since some of them in my opinion...

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This is an important topic, and firmly think we should talk more about periods and create new policies to address the problems faced by women who menstruate. In that line, this is a relevant book ... however, I got bored.

I enjoyed the first 80 pages or so, but the second half was very long and I didn't see the point, too many repetitions and name-dropping. I understand the need to acknowledge contributors to the cause, but for an outsider (me) it's too much. The first pages were informative though, and I'm glad I read them.
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As a person with easy access to sanitary products, I didn't even think that periods could be a huge social and economic issue. But the author demonstrates that millions of women around the world find the options in life limited because of this simple fact.

This is definitely a very necessary book, but I found it rather dry. Although the case studies were fascinating (I particularly enjoyed the story of India's 'pad man'), these are interspersed with large chunks of facts and figures. These portions are rather dry and I found it a slog to go through.
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I loved this book, and honestly, the period conversation has been long overdue. Now that periods are being talked about openly, many things are rapidly changing. This book takes a look at many of the changes and different facets of the period issue. An excellent feminist look at periods.
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A very important and inspiring read! Not only do I feel more informed about how people all around the world deal with menstruation but also how I can get active. I loved that it included trans people, it is a generally inclusive book.
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This book doesn't shy away from any topic regarding periods. It's interesting to read something that most people won't talk about. Heck even going to buy tampons is sometimes considered TMI.
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The first time I thought about period activism is when I learned of Tampon Run, the highly addictive game created by high school girls after attending coding camp. Though I knew something about the movement, this was an enlightening look at what women the world over are doing to remove the stigma(s) around periods.
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Periods Gone Public is a book about the recent emerge of period activism, but also about the problems that women around the world face during their periods. The author mainly concentrated on the period activism in the year 2015 which, in her opinion, is the year that made periods go public. She also shows the hardships women in other countries and cultures have to go through because of a lack of education and sanitary products. But she mentions the issues of poor, homeless or gender dysphoric women in the US. Finally, she proposes to view other problems that specifically concern women through the "mentruals lens", such as viewing "abortion as necessary healthcare".

It...

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Thank you for this book, finally someone is writing about a subject that society thinks and believes is taboo. I am glad that this book was written and the topic was brought to light. Everyone needs to realize that half of the world expel blood for 5- 7 days every month and survive. I was surprised how well researched this book was and how the author is standing up for this topic. Menstrual equity is something that needs to happen and be fought for. I enjoyed the book and I honestly believe that every library and school should have this book available to everyone to read and learn about menstrual equity. I honestly think that MEN should read this book and realize the struggle that women...

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If you call yourself a feminist, or a equalist, or just belive we should have an equal society you should read this book. The book take a great look into how periods still is a taboo today. We still have a long way to go for an equal society were necessary health articles are provided to those who cannot afford it.

During the book the author use language such as people who menstruate in stead of women who menstruate, and health products in stead of female products in order to shine a light on other differensens we have in the society. We shine a light on the people who find them self in the wrong body, but we do not let them have a place to feel safe. In today's world we have both...

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Informative and a subject in need of more open discussion.
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Bravo!  Such a well-researched, well-organized and well-written book.  Periods Gone Public rides the wave of current attention on the universal issue of menstruation and gives the reader background  on the history of menstruation taboos, ways that hygiene has evolved over the years, challenges in the modern world regarding type of hygiene products, cost and accessibility.  The information was eye opening in many ways and I feel that I keep myself well-informed.  Also, the narrative of the book was entertaining and so easily digested.  Would recommend to everyone, but particularly to those interested in social justice issues.
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This is a must read for everyone but especially strong feminists to read. It's right on point and needs to be shared. Especially in today's political climate this strong book needs to be taken seriously and may become one of the most revered books of the new generation of liberation.
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OK - Here it goes:

EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ THIS. Not only because it is very well-written with lots of fun and witty wordplay (I found myself laughing way more often than I thought I would!), but because it seriously looks into the crisis that faces human beings that menstruate and what we should do to help out the more marginalized and homeless in today's capitalist world. It's not just about that, but also emphasizes how poorly the products we use are regulated- such as how ingredients and manufacturing processes don't have to be disclosed to consumers. Honestly though, it's about so much more than these two things that I've highlighted, and in today's...

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Coincidentally, I started my period a couple hours after I started reading this, and it ended several hours before finishing it. (Awesome!) If you think that is gross, or you are filled with disgust & awe that I could mention something so "personal", you need to read this book, because that's exactly the line of thinking this book is attempting to combat.

While it felt repetitive, the adage that this affects HALF of the population actually <b>needs to be repeated. <i>A LOT.</i> In terms of policy making and misogynistic thinking and general degradation, the other half that this does not affect (<i>even though it actually really does</i>)...

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This. book. was. so. needed. 

Bless this book, I will never get over it I believe.
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This is the full metal jacket of menstruation activism- I loved it. Weiss-Wolf considers the issue of access to adequate menstrual care from a multitude of perspectives- political, feminist, socio-economic and environmental, as well as questioning the possible future of the new wave of possible menstrual care in the form of profit based companies.

The author considers a multitude of movements in the developing world which are opening new opportunities for women, both in terms of income and education as well as proper hygiene supplies, as well as the movements in the developing world toward environmentally-friendly options. She also discusses the tough situations faced by members of the...

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