The Girl in the Tower

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 12 Feb 2018

Member Reviews

Personally I love this series, and I believe readers will, too.
Was this review helpful?

The Girl in the Tower is the second installment of Katherine Arden's Winternight Trilogy and this trilogy has ALL the feels guys!

I loved this book from start to finish. Sometimes, I really wasn't sure who the girl in the tower was supposed to be, but overall, the story was phenomenal. As always Arden sucks you into her medieval world with vivid imagery and ghosts and fairy tales that will make you shudder and crave for more. I had so much fun reading this one, that I can't wait for the third part of the trilogy to be published.
I truly recommend this series to everyone who loves fairy tales, strong female characters and fantastic scenery with a historic touch.

Katherine...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?
This is just an amazingly well written series with a great plot. The writing is simply beautiful and lures you in to a fairytale. Just great!
Was this review helpful?
A wonderful follow-up to The Bear and the Nightingale; raw, riveting. I will definitely be recommending this at my the library; breathlessly waiting for Katherine Arden’s next book - though this one will be hard to top!
Was this review helpful?

The Girl in the Tower nicely moves forward from the ending of The Bear and the Nightingale, with an older, but just as adventurous Vasya. In this second installment, Vasya is accused of withcraft because of her ability to see and communicate with creatures that other people can't, but that people still fear. Superstitions, fear of the unexplained, and suspicion of anyone who may be different put Vasya in actual physical danger if she doesn't choose to either be controlled by a husband or the Christian church through the structure of a convent. Vasya chooses to run and that's where things take off.

The Girl in the Tower is much more adventure and action than world building...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?

It’s become quite clear that I will read anything Katherine Arden writes. Her debut The Bear and the Nightingale was one of my favourite reads of last year. I dare say that Bear is a mere drop in the ocean when it comes to Arden’s writing and clever plot twists in The Girl in the Tower.

Following on from the ending of Bear, Vasya is branded a witch and because she's not content with just being some man’s wife or living in a convent as a nun for the rest of her life, she leaves her village with Solovey. Vasya braves the cold wilderness and doesn't look back, she wants to see the world and experience life but the only way to do this is to disguise herself as a Russian boy.

There...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?

This richly layered tapestry of early Russia reveals a deeply researched history which flows smoothly into the supernatural fantasy world of early fairy tale and fable. Even with a fully embraced religion, the beautifully decorated orthodoxy of Russia, the harsh weather and life of the times demanded its own explanations of nature. Into this background is introduced a cast of complex characters, many of whom we met in Book 1, but who are now adults (or older adults) rather than children. The second book stands well on its own; you are probably going to prefer to read the books in order, however, to enjoy the full vision of author Katherine Arden (think Tolkien!).

Among other topics...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?

Originally posted on Forever Young Adult on 2018 March 22

BOOK REPORT for The Girl in the Tower (Winternight Trilogy #2) by Katherine Arden

Careful, Sweetie: spoilers! This is the second book in the Winternight Trilogy, so if you haven’t read The Bear and the Nightingale, you should probably hop back in the TARDIS and go curl up in the library by the pool with the first book before continuing.

Cover Story: Montell Jordan
BFF Charm: Yay
Swoonworthy Scale: 8
Talky Talk: Like A Fine Wine
Bonus Factors: Cross-Dressing, Loyal Pets, Family, Magic
Anti-Bonus Factor: Terem
Relationship Status: To The Ends Of The Earth

Cover Story: Montell Jordan



This cover is as pretty as a classical...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?
This book ROCKED.  Fairy tale fantasy adventure at its best!!
Was this review helpful?
I had to go and read the first book in this series as I had not done so. This is a wonderful sequel. It is just as captivating at the first. 

Thank you Netgalley for providing me with a review copy in exchange for my honest and unbiased opinion of it.
Was this review helpful?

Truly excellent. If Arden's previous book was a fairy tale, this follow-up is about the consequences of the fairy tale. It is more grounded, and doesn't shy away from harsh realities for all that it revels in magic and fantasy too. Vasya's journey continues, in wonderful and terrible ways, and we see a lot more of her extended family and of old-timey Russia now that she has left home.

This installment has different subtextual concerns too. Where the first mainly took on religion and spirituality, this one zeroes in more on heroism, responsibility, and gender. I am getting a little tired of the "girl must disguise herself as a boy" trope, but the way it's done...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?
As the second book the The Bear and the Nightingale, I wasn't sure what to expect. But after reading it, I can tell you that if you liked the first one, you'll like the second too! Highly imaginative and colorful, if you are looking for a story that will make you smile, you've come to the right place. 

Thank you for the opportunity to review.
Was this review helpful?

She literally just unwittingly throws herself into the fire and then she realizes she's in the fire - she just keeps doing her thing. In 'Nightingale' (don't we love Solovey!?) though she was in danger - she was in the safety of her home. Sure, that home was surrounded by neighbors who called her a witch, the guardian spirits were dying, and vampires were literally rising up from the grave to claw at their door at night - but it was still home. The action, the stakes, the choices are far more daunting and heart-pounding. Little Vasya has grown up. She becomes a woman but on her own terms. And if you think the harshness of her childhood realities was heavy? It has...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?
This was a wonderful book in a great series. Can't wait to read the next one!
Was this review helpful?
So excited to read this sequel! Did not disappoint.
Was this review helpful?

This is the direct sequel to “The Bear and the Nightingale”, and resumes where the latter left off, following both Sasha and Vasya from that point onwards.

I’m a little torn about this book. While still calling upon Russian folklore and legends, these didn’t play as much of a part as they did in the first book, and I was a little disappointed to see them take the backburner. (Morozko was still here, but I don’t know if it was so good for him, all things considered when it comes to the ending.) Paradoxically, this time, I also liked that the focus shifted more towards city politics, with the characters having to grapple with ‘what consequences will our actions have in the grand scheme of...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?
A fantastical journey with a fierce, independent protagonist. A great read for lovers of fairy tales, historical fiction, and epic fantasies. This book is written with the most beautiful storytelling that keeps you on the edge of your seat as well as drags you in with its' prose.
Was this review helpful?

As I said after the first book, The Bear and the Nightingale, I am not a big fantasy reader, but i would classify this book also as folktale/mythology/history. I was looking forward to this book in the trilogy and even though I did not enjoy it as much as the first, it was still a very strong story and moved along quickly.

Medieval Russian superstitions are the backbone of this trilogy, with many of the same chyerti (spirits and/or demons) in this book as the first as well as some new ones. Vasya (Vasilisa) has the sight passed down to her by her mother and grandmother before her. Unfortunately, she has been labeled a witch, so unless she wants to be sent to a convent or marry someone she...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?

This second book in the series, the first being the enchanting The Bear and the Nightingale, surpassed my expectations. It was every bit thrilling as the first. This second book finds Vasya choosing her own path of adventure over marriage and leaving behind an uncertain relationship with Morozko. While some readers may be pining away for their union, I loved that she stayed true to her character and set out on her own path with her trusted friend, Solovey. The dangers they face and the choices she's forced to make in this second installment makes the tension all too real, Arden masterly portrays the inner conflicts Vasya and the other characters struggle with. What the heart wants vs...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?

When I read The Bear and the Nightingale I was enraptured in a way that I had not been with a book in a very long time. I was grieved to reach the ending, fearing that I had read the last of these characters that I had come to love so much. The Girl in the Tower was an unexpected joy, and knowing now that there will be a third book is even better.
The Bear and the Nightingale was such a strong start that one would expect anything following it to pale in comparison, but that did not happen with The Girl in the Tower. Vasya and Morozko are just as delightful and frustrating in this sequel and I find myself cheering for Vasya through every victory and defeat. The mystery and tales entwined...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?