The Girl in The Tower

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 16 Feb 2018

Member Reviews

After reading the first title in this trilogy (The Bear & the Nightingale), I couldn't wait for the second title..... and it certainly did not disappoint. The first title, at least to me, was quite calm compared to the second, which was full of adventure, but still captured the charm of the Russian folk tales that I enjoyed so much in the first title. I cannot wait until the final title in this magical trilogy.
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Another fascinating story by Katherine Arden. The story is of non stop action and being continually surprised by the unexpected. The whole is imbued with magic and it completely fascinating. The characters are easy to identify with and all their activities are essential to the development of the story.
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The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden was featured on the February 2018 Librarians' Choice Top 10 list https://static1.squarespace.com/static/56d74c4004426214f2d28631/t/5a6e54d9e2c4832dd2d66fcf/1517180134062/Top10+February+18+A4+Flyer.pdf
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“She was supposed to tire of her folly, go home with her necklace, wear it, and tremble sometimes, at the memory of a frost-demon, in her impetuous youth. She was supposed to bear girl-children, who might wear the necklace in turn. She was not supposed to-“

*I received a free ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review*

Orphaned and cast out as a witch by her village, Vasya’s options are few: resign herself to life in a convent, or allow her older sister to make her a match with a Moscovite prince. Both doom her to life in a tower, cut off from the vast world she longs to explore. So instead she chooses adventure, disguising herself as a boy and riding her horse into the woods.
...

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Following on from The Bear and the Nightingale, The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden sees heroine Vasya encounter more supernatural powers across the historic, Russian-inspired landscape.

The end of the last book saw Vasya be rescued by the Winter King, Morozko, a powerful master of death who resides deep in the forest. He has taken a liking to Vasya and her wilfulness, although he is reluctant to admit that to himself, and has agreed to teach her some self defence and provide her with weaponry. With these new skills, Vasya thinks herself ready to ride for Moscow and be reunited with her sister and brother.

However, upon leaving the Winter King she comes across villages burned by...

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Stunning sequel to the Bear and the Nightingale which follows the events of what happens to Vasilla after the dramatic events of book one. 
Free from her little village she sets out to explore more of the world on her own with only her horse for company but danger is always lurking around the corner and she is never true my as alone as she thinks.
She also encounters other familiar faces on her journey to discover not only the world but who she really is.
Beautifully written series with book three eagerly awaited.
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I received a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review. This goddamn book. I can't deal with how excellent a follow up this was to Arden's series. I am in love.

 The Girl in the Tower The Bear and The Nightingale. picks up from where we left off at the end of Vasya is sent on her way to begin exploring the world but the Winter King is never far from her side. I loved their relationship, I think Arden did a really good job of balancing Morozco's perception of Vasya's naivete with his growing emotional attachment to her. I think it layered in really well with the rest of the story.
We follow Vasya to Moscow after she escapes from her village for fear of being...

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In this, the second of Katherine Arden's Winternight Trilogy we continue the story of Vasya. As a young orphaned girl who is suspected of witchcraft options are few- to enter a convent or let her sister arrange a marriage for her. Both options are anathema to her freedom loving spirit and she chooses her own path- to disguise herself as a boy and ride away on her horse into the forest.

The land is scourged by bandits, destroying villages and stealing the young girls. After coming across a devastated village she Vasya is determined to rescue three girls. This leads her down a dangerous path.

Fairytale? Folklore? History? This trilogy has them all. This second book is a worthy follow...

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WOW, this truly lived up to the legacy of the first book. I felt Arden really excelled in her character writing, as the changes and progression that Vasya goes through flowed naturally and felt authentic to her character.
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I absolutely adored the first book and was quite worried that the author couldn't replicate the same magic in her follow-up.  I was thankfully dead wrong. Roll on book 3! Thank you for the opportunity to read this ARC.
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A fantastic continuation of The Bear & The Nightingale. Vasya is becoming a woman, which is at odds with her appearance as she disguises herself as a boy in order to ravel freely.  Far more action-packed and perilous than the first book, there feels less folklore and magic, but the ride is indeed still a beautiful, lyrical yarn.
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There is so much to ‘The Girl in the Tower’ by Katherine Arden, follow-up to ‘The Bear and the Nightingale’. A strong female heroine, magical mystical Russian folklore, fighting, horses and danger. Vasya is an awkward teenage girl in the mythical Middle Ages of old ‘Rus who does not like her traditional choice of marriage or convent; in ‘The Girl in the Tower’ she is older and more defiant. You just know she is heading for trouble. She leaves home to wander and look at the world, refusing to worry about survival in the winter forest, and in so doing stumbles into banditry and violence that has implications for the power of the throne. I read the second half of this at a pace, wanting to...

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“Vasilisa Petrovna, murderer, savior, lost child, rode away from the house in the fir-grove.”

“The Girl in the Tower” is the second in the Winternight trilogy. In it, Katherine has produced an extensive fantasy world that, from the first pages of the book, constantly provide hints of the depths of her creation that we only see glimpses of. As a reviewer I never had the privilege of reading the first book in the trilogy, however, the best works of fiction are just as capable of standing alone on a shelf as well as alongside their fellow works.

In “The Girl in the Tower”, a young highly capable woman called Vasya must choose between a life of marriage and child-bearing or life as a nun;...

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A stunningly beautiful story that expands upon the exquisite world in The Bear and The Nightingale.
If you like Laini Taylor and Leigh Bardugo, then these books are must reads.
This book delves further into the mythology and offers up some new characters which only add to the enjoyment. I'd definitely recommend reading the books in order as this adds a layer of richness to the first one. 
I can't wait for book three!
Thank you to netgalley for the chance to read this book.
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Fear not gentle reader, I am back with my Week in Review :) I thought I would give you a short break from my WIR and share two of my SPFBO 2017 reviews. I hope you enjoyed them. Keep your eye on the blog for reviews from my fellow Qwillery reviewers on what they thought of the books they read for the competition.

I had a little pooch at NetGalley this week and was surprised by two books I had read last year but hadn't yet reviewed. Lately books have been available months before their publish date and then I get all excited about reading them. This time I had convinced myself that I had actually posted a review here but after some checking it transpired I hadn't left you a...

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I wasn't a massive fan of the first book but felt that this one was equally enjoyable. It delved more into the characters and portrayed more of the world. I loved the vivid descriptions and the way Arden paints the world.
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The Girl in the Tower is absolutely gorgeously written. This is a sequel that actually ends up better than it's predecessor. The story expands on the first, exploring the world laced with Russian folklore. Vasya will have you cheering. I truly cannot recommend Arden's beautiful writing enough.
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Having loved the first one I was apprehensive about a sequel but it was just as brilliantly written and just as exciting. The storyline was gripping and Vasya is a character you root for the whole way through.
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I love Katherine Arden's writing. I'm obsessed with how she manages to create an atmosphere and completely submerge readers into a different time and space. Her writing reminded me a lot of the Russian fairytales I grew up with. My grandma would tell them to me everynight and Arden's writing literally brought me back to that moment.
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The Girl in the Tower continues the tale of Vasya and the fantastic adventure introduced to us in superb The Bear and the Nightingale. The Girl in the Tower is as good as Arden's first book. The writing and storytelling is still as magical as ever and the world building will immerse you in Arden's Russian fairy tale. If you have read the first book then you must read this one. If you haven't read the first book then you definitely should!
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