Wild World

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 25 Nov 2017

Member Reviews

Because the story was set in my coming-of-age era, I anticipated enjoying it and identifying with the plot events. The story, however, was lackluster, and the actual events seemed to be offhandedly related by the author, without any depth or emotion. I'm sorry, but it disappointed me.
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Woodstock meets Serpico.  Wild World tells the story of a man coming of age as the Hippie Generation came to a close with peace and love being blasted away by cold hard bullets as the Kent State shootings stunned a generation.  Rather than "tune in, drop out," idealistic Ivy League college graduate Steve decides that he can make a difference in the world by becoming a police officer.  From there, his life changes as he grapples with estrangement from his pot smoking college friends and girlfriend Roxie and an often- corrupt hard-edged tour of duty in the Providence Police a Department where he doesn't fit in with having recently been a long haired college student and his disgust at the rampant corruption he finds, which like Al Pacino in Serpico he takes on.  At its best, the book has a great narrative voice, easy to follow, realistic, down-to-earth.  There are times, however, where the stereotypes of corrupt mean police suffers from a lack of nuance.
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Wild World begins in 1973 and follows a Brown graduate caught up in activism who wants to make a difference by becoming a police officer.  Interesting premise and the opening of the book during the Kent State shootings gripped me at the outset.  However, the book loses pacing fairly quickly and, while the story is appealing, somehow the book doesn't quite live up to it.
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An idealistic Brown College Graduate, protesting the vietnam War wants to make a difference locally and instead of going to Law School, joins the Providence, R.I. Police Force. His grittiness and idealism are partially fueled by his love for a pre-med student at the Abrown. their relationship and his uncovering of large scale corruption, including the University make for a very interesting and intense novel.
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