The Recovering

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 03 Jul 2018

Member Reviews

This was an honest and beautifully written book. At times it felt like it was trying too hard to be "that beautifully written recovery book".
Was this review helpful?
It seems like the reviews for this book are all over the place. Some people hate it and others love it. I think that's because what Jamison attempted to do was much more ambitious than just writing a memoir about her recovery or a book about addiction. Jamison blends literary criticism, personal narrative, social analysis, and a brief overview of the history of recovery programs all in one book. And while I can see how this blend could just not work for some people, I found it pretty brilliant.
Was this review helpful?

When Leslie Jamison was nine and her father was forty-nine, she asked him why people drank. That day he told her that drinking was dangerous. It wasn’t dangerous for everyone, he said, “but it was dangerous for us.” Two close relatives were alcoholics—his father and his sister, Phyllis— and, as Jamison later points out, genetics do contribute to alcoholism. Her father was right to warn her. It’s too bad she didn’t heed his words.

As a child, Jamison was shy, self-conscious, and perpetually worried about saying the wrong thing, but she earned praise for her cleverness. Though her parents divorced when she was eleven, her family life was not particularly dysfunctional. She was, however...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?

I've been wanting to read Leslie Jamison's THE RECOVERING: INTOXICATION AND ITS AFTERMATH ever since I've heard about its release. I requested the ARC through Netgalley and was thrilled that I was approved to read the advanced review copy. But, life happened and I wasn't able to read it right away. Finally, Finally, I have been able to dive into this account of Jamison's story.
But is it Jamison's story? Yes, of course it is. It also the story of the life of writers and the mythos that is the intoxication-creativity "link." Jamison's book is extensively researched...extensively. Readers will learn about the drinking lives and art of Raymond...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?

Leslie Jamison is the author of a popular collection of essays, The Empathy Exams. With this book she follows her own experiences with alcoholism and recovery interspersed with other writer’s struggles. She explores the connection between addiction and creativity and discusses whether it is a necessary connection. I found Jamison’s account to be an insightful look at the ways in which addiction occurs and the affect it has on relationships and the creative process and her sections on recovery are revelatory. While, I enjoyed the parts concerning other authors, such as Jean Rhys and David Foster Wallace, towards the end I found those sections to drag a bit more. Overall, I finished this...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?
Leslie Jameson has  written a real raw look at recovering from addiction from her own personal intimate story to other authors  known people who suffered struggled trying to recover.An amazing view of the realities heartaches struggles of the lives of addicts on the road to recovery.An amazing book .Thanks # netgalley
Was this review helpful?
Essential reading.  As a sober person, I found this book illuminating, funny, and a great read.
Was this review helpful?

There were times in the beginning of Jamison's memoir where I felt like I was getting way too much information about her romantic relationships, and then, as the memoir progressed, I realized how attached she was both to these men and booze and understood the dependency connection. I've never read better comments about "The Infinite Jest" as I did in this book. Damn, I should have read 50 pages a day with a highlighter in hand. Instead, at times, I had reading blackouts, wondering if I had read the pages I just turned . The anecdotes of other writers and musicians and their recovery, or lack of recovery, were intriguing also. Reading on a Kindle, when I did reach...

See Full Review
Was this review helpful?