The Disturbed Girl's Dictionary

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 28 Feb 2018

Member Reviews

This book. Holy shit. This book. I just. I want to pass this book out to my students and go "Look! Literature isn't just written by white people. You don't need to just read books by dead, white men! This is Your Story! Someone understands." I want to give this book to co-workers (and senators and other politicians) and go "Look! This is REAL. Get your head out off your ass and let's actually do something good."

I will be honest - I was a little apprehensive about reading this but the summary sucked me in completely. And then I read some of the reviews on goodreads by people who did not even finish reading this book because (and here I laughed) of...

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I was granted the ARC by Netgalley. It took me a bit to get into the rhythm and style of this very unique book, and when I did... BAM!! I was getting up in the morning before everyone else so I could read more about disturbed girl Macy. As a teacher I felt sad for her yet frustrated. Reader be aware, the content and language is mature but completely appropriate to the situation. Again, thank you Netgalley for this opportunity.

Meet, Macy Cashmere, a high school girl living in the margins of society. Obstinate, noncompliant and she knows very well that she emotionally disturbed. She’s a problem that no one can break through, whether at home or at school.

Macy is a child of neglect, abuse...

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The best thing about this book is that Macy doesn't understand any other way for life to be, so she presents it as she sees it -- there's no other lens or filter except the ones the readers bring. That being said, it can take a while to adjust to her worldview, and it will be uncomfortable. I found the beauty by page 60 (see entry: Bestie) and while I can identify with some of her experiences, it's good to hear a different voice; this is a great window book. I'd recommend for fans of Angie Thomas, Sharon Draper, or Ellen Hopkins.
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I am still trying to finish this book, it really bothers me the way the author decided to portray the characters, it's like every bad stereotype of teenagers that have no education at all.   Unfortunately I work with students and none of the students I have worked with or teenagers I know really talked or act that way.  So I'm still trying to give this book a chance.
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Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

I'm but a few chapters into this book and, already, I'm very impressed. I can already see this book hitting home with many of my students because it's rare to find a book that is willing to present us with a protagonist who has social and environmental cards stacked against her, as do many of my students.

Macy Cashmere describes herself (as does everyone else seem to say) as disturbed. But, her brother is in foster care, having been taken away by Child Protective Services, her mom is often with "Mr. Guests," (and magically has money once they leave), and she feeds herself with crumbs from the...

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The first intuition of some readers may be to give up early on because of the poor grammar of this book. If you do, you will miss out on an amazing and emotional story!

The protagonist is a black girl from a poor section of America. She has an attitude that gets her into trouble, and seemingly few friends. This type of person is usually shunned in our communities. Fight through the desire to shun this book.

As you read, you start to realize that her "attitude" is what keeps her safe. The friends she does have, are extremely close. She is full of love, but knows a lot about danger, grief, and hate. Her journey, along with that of her family members and her friends...

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Still currently reading but just had to put in my two cents in regards to people “rating” this novel. I’m just wondering if any of these readers been teachers in an inner city school or if any readers (who gave low ratings to this novel) have ever come in contact with children (yes, children) who behave this way? Life in an urban setting is very scary and this character has (not acclimated to) but grown up in this setting. Thus the manner of writing reflects the character’s environment. Seems like it’s easy to judge when you’ve never experienced this environment, but so far I’m impressed with the accuracy and the overall character development.

*edited to 5 stars upon finishing*
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I picked up this book because I wanted to read something outside of my normal genres and I was intrigued by a book written in the format of a dictionary. I appreciate that this could be a good insight into the life of a troubled girl with a very difficult life, but I could not get into it. I picked up this book because I wanted to read something outside of my normal genres and I was intrigued by a book written in the format of a dictionary. I appreciate that this could be a good insight into the life of a troubled girl with a very difficult life, but I could not get into it. I can see it making its way onto the reading list for Teen Literature classes in MLIS programs.
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I've read better fan fiction than this. The stylistic choice (I hope it was a choice and not the author's) to write with terrible grammar and accent pulled me from the story so much that I really don't know what the story was truly about. Very amateur all around.
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