Southernmost

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 19 Jun 2018

Member Reviews

In the wake of a devastating flood along Tennessee’s Cumberland River, evangelical preacher Asher Sharp meets sharp resistance when he welcomes two gay men into his house and his congregation. Troubled by the intolerance of those he loves – and still guilty over his own behavior when his brother came out of the closet – Asher battles back, only to lose his marriage, his church and custody of his son, Justin. He then makes the fateful decision to kidnap Justin and drive to Key West, where he suspects his estranged brother is living. A road trip that begins with a crisis of conscience and faith turns into a journey of self-discovery as Asher seeks acceptance in a community where difference is...

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4.5 stars.

"'Sometimes we laugh and sometimes we cry and as long as we're alive, we can deal with everything else. You know?'"

Shortly after the Supreme Court legalizes same-sex marriage, a flood ravages preacher Asher Sharp's small Tennessee town, leaving many in his congregation homeless or with significant property damage. In the wake of the flood, Asher offers shelter to a gay couple, and they begin to visit his church, which roils his congregation to no end, as many believe the flood was caused by the Supreme Court's decision.

Asher's simple act of kindness emphasizes the cracks in his marriage to Lydia, devout and unyielding in her religious...

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This book was well written and very fun to read. The characters were great and I enjoyed the world building. The author does a great job at introducing the characters and moving the plot along. There were a few things that I didn't like, but it wasn't enough to really sway me one way or the other. It's definitely a story that I can get lost in and both feel for the characters. It is definitely a go-to novel that I highly recommend to anyone who loves a great read. Definitely a highly recommended read that I think everyone will enjoy.
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Asher is a father, a preacher, a husband, a brother, struggling with the culture of belief he finds himself in the center or. In the novel, Southernmost, A timely novel, Southernmost deals with the conflict of coming to terms with and standing up for what you believe, even when you know that in doing so you will risk losing everything.

As an Evangelical preacher, Asher has always seen the world through one set of conservatively religious lenses, causing him to reject his gay brother. A catastrophic flood is the catalyst of change for Asher. He finds himself welcoming a gay couple into his church, coming to terms with how wrongly he treated his own brother, and how he can no longer stay in...

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Let me begin my saying I love the writer Silas House! However, I did not connect with this book in the way I have with his other works...and I don't really know why :( All of the elements were there that would indicate I would love this book including a tender, kind man who questions his religion when he finds it lacking in humanity, who explores his past misdeeds and sets his sights on making them right, and one who loves his son and wants to do right by him at all costs. This book was timely, dealing with small town mentality, religious inflexibility, marriage equality, child custody, and grief that never leaves. I liked this book...but I should have loved it and be recommending...

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This was my first Silas House read, and I am forever a fan. This was such a great storyline--so thought-provoking, perspective-shifting, life-changing. I fell in love with the characters and cared deeply about the outcome. I cannot say enough good things about Southernmost. This was truly one amazing read.
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I got a little nervous when the book began with a Pentecostal preacher and his uber-devout white suffering but surviving a massive flood just after gay marriage was legalized by the Supreme Court. My nerves were because I hadn’t realized the extent to which this book is based in evangelical religion. That fault is mine.

That being said, things took a turn I was not expecting when Asher, the Pentecostal preacher, stood up for something he wasn’t sure he even understood - same-sex love.

Things escalate very quickly for the first third of House’s novel. As Asher preached acceptance and tolerance but was rebuffed by his congregation, he quickly found himself on the road to divorce, tried to...

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Asher Sharp is an evangelical preacher in Tennessee. His community experiences a terrible flood and “More than one of his congregants . . . blamed this new flood on the Supreme Court’s ruling [in favour of gay marriage].” A decade earlier, Asher rejected his brother Luke when he announced that he was a homosexual; Luke has been feeling guilty about turning his back on his brother and now welcomes two gay men into his church. That decision results in his being dismissed as pastor. Asher also clashes with his wife Lydia because of her religious intolerance and ends up taking his 9-year-old son Justin with him to Key West where he thinks Luke might be living.

This is not an...

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The setting: Asher Sharp, an evangelical preacher in a small community along the Cumberland River in Tennessee, faces a crisis of faith, marriage, community, and fatherhood. In the aftermath of a flood he tries to offer shelter to two gay men, setting off a course where his marriage and livelihood come crashing down. A sermon he delivers defending the right of gays to exist without condemnation goes viral. He flees to Key West with his nine-year old son, Justin, thinking that's where his estranged brother lives [who, it turns out, is also gay].

The story is really set in motion when Asher takes [kidnaps] Justin from his mother-in-law, Zelda--who he is closer to than his own [dead]...

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I've heard a lot about this author and I do believe he writes beautifully. But the subject was another thing. I can see a minister wanting to help but not struggling so much about God's word, leaving his marriage and then kidnapping his son. Just too much!
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This book will be released on my birthday!  I can't wait to share it with our patrons.  What a gift to all of us readers of fine fiction,
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I discovered Silas House years ago in an Appalachian literature course. That was Parchment of Leaves, and this is now.

Southernmost is familiar territory in terms of geography, but we readers get to explore some new terrain with House’s text. Present still is a thematic exploration of religion and its role in daily life.

House takes us into the work with a deluge scene that conjures images of judgment and early chapters in Genesis. But what follows roots the story in more modern soil.

Southernmost is an important work from a talented voice - within region, or more broadly considered. The questions the book raises speak with relevance, and House delivers in the lovely adornment of...

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I received this on #netgalley in exchange for my review. A disgraced evangelical preacher finds his religion and community too angry and judgmental. After a divorce, he kidnaps his son and goes to Key West where he hopes to find his estranged brother. These huge transformations happen quickly without much exploration of the cause. Overall, I found the themes, development, characters and the writing to be overly simplistic and sentimental. 2.5⭐️
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Surprised at how emotional this book is. Doesn't go for the jugular like some books, but it was evocative. Well done.
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I hadn’t read a book by Silas House prior to this and I can promise it won't be the last. This book is written with such gorgeous language. The story is of Asher, who is an evangelical preacher, born and raised in Tennessee, where he still lives with his wife and 9 year old son. I was concerned that, as a reader who is not religious that I would have a difficult time with some of the ideas. House has done a great job of leaving scripture and Bible at the door, and writes about heart.

The story is set on the Cumberland River that experiences the devastation of a 100 year flood and as a result, the community is ravaged by flood waters. Asher spends days helping neighbors and of...

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I have a pl;ace in my heart and in my bookshelf for those literary ministers/pastors/priests who journey through a crisis of faith and find growth, love and or redemption.  From the classics of Graham Greene and Willa Cather to the more recent works of Hilary Mantel (Fludd),  Andre Alexis (Pastoral),  Elizabeth Strout (Abide With Me) and of course Marilyn Robinson's wonderful trilogy, men (always men) of faith find their way and take me along. Now there is Silas Simon offering the journey suited to our time.  It is an engaging, hopeful and brave story and I love it.
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Yikes, this was transparent. It felt like getting hit over the head with the moral of the story. I didn't finish it.
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In an editorial in the Washington Post on May 7, 2018, E.J. Dionne writes that "[m]any young people [have come] to regard religion as 'judgmental, homophobic, hypocritical and too political.'" Asher Sharp couldn't agree more. He's a Holy Roller pastor who's having a crisis of faith. He's been harboring some long-standing guilt about how he and his mother treated his brother when he came out as gay, and when he's forced to turn away a gay couple seeking shelter in a flood, his crisis comes to a head. In trying to accept the two men into his church, he loses his pulpit, and in trying to bring his more liberal thinking into his own home, he...

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Thank you, Silas House, for writing this book. It compassionately looks at a hugely controversial, divisive issue – I should say, it looks at the people that are surrounding the issue. The issue is homosexuality. House’s story doesn’t give answers. It just loves the people involved, from the pastor who’s decided all people should be treated well regardless of their orientation to his fearful wife to the gay couple serve as Asher’s catalyst to the angry church people who reject him.

Asher Sharp is a pastor in an American community that overall does not like gay people. They are an abomination before God. Asher thought so too, preaching the common “love the sinner, hate the sin” bumper...

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At university, I took a course in religion with a professor who was ordained and had studied under Karl Barth. He told me that students come into his class with a naive belief and what he taught shook them for they had never viewed their faith community and beliefs from the 'outside'. And, the professor continued, perhaps they will later return to their church and reaffirm it, this time with a deeper kind of faith.

But letting go of what one is taught, the beliefs held by one's community is rare and hard. I watched church leaders endeavor to destroy a church over their perceptions of the denomination's Social Principles as approving sin. It is more common for people to...

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