The Tattooist of Auschwitz

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 11 Feb 2018

Member Reviews

If you’re familiar with local (and international) bestselling book lists of late, you’ll recognise the title The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris. This widespread regard is well-deserved, for the novel handles the balance between the intimacy of the central love story while accounting for the atrocities that were occurring at the same time.
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Really enjoyed this story, told in beautiful prose by a very sympathetic, emotive writer. 
And the cover is amazing. Definitely worth picking up.
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I have read a few books about the Holocaust, and a couple of them included first-hand accounts from some of the prisoners. This book takes you directly to Auschwitz-Birkenau alongside Lale and Gita as they experience what feels like a lifetime of inhumanity to the reader, but realistically is merely three years. This story is one of survival for not only Lale and Gita, but also the temporary friendships they made with others and the heartbreak of their dissolution. Lale tattooed the numbers on the arms of incoming groups to the concentration camp, but he found a way to help those with whom he came into contact by smuggling them his extra rations or working with outside sources.
By the end...

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The Tattooist of Auschwitz was included on The Librarians' Choice Top 10 list for February 2018 http://www.librarianschoice.org/
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It is totally OK starting a review by just saying 'Go read this book' and stop here right?
This is a book based on a true story. The person tattooing the numbers on the arms of the prisoners telling his story. A prisoner himself. A heartbreaking story about survival, love, fear and loss. The only thing that annoyed me in reading the book was the writing at points. The book was written as a screenplay initially and this is still obvious while reading disturbing the flow at points. But let this not stop you from reading this story.
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With the abundance of Holocaust literature that floods the market today, one can be forgiven to feeling slightly de-sensitised to the horrors that are presented to us in each offering.

But every now and then a piece of work comes along to shake us up out of our sensory overload. A book that reminds us of exactly what we are meant to feel about Holocaust writings – that even the novels are not novels: they are all fact-based; all have some aspect of non-fiction about them.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz is, actually, based on the life-story of Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew who arrived at Auschwitz and was given the job of tattooing the newly arrived inmates with the infamous tattoos that...

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The Tattooist of Auschwitz is based on true events and I was pulled in from the first page. I love historical fiction and this heartbreaking story is now on my favorites list!
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Many thanks go to Bonnier Publishing, Heather Morris, and Netgalley for the free copy of this book in exchange for my unbiased review. I cannot begin to acknowledge how difficult Eisenberg's life was as a tattooist. How does one live with that choice: to either do this or die? Someone has to do it. And he wants to survive to have a wife, have children, live a better life than what's been fished out so far. I find it difficult to review books about the Holocaust because the situation is one that I am not worthy to judge. All I can do is express my opinion on how it was written. And the account was written really well. I felt the despair and frustration, the fear and hunger. The...

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Hmmmm...I don't know. I felt like this book fell flat for me. The writing and plot weren't bad but they didn't really...work? The content itself was interesting and I'll always advocate for victim stories to be shared and read.
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What an incredibly moving story of love and survival! It is a heartbreaking, but beautiful story of Lale and Gita and the horrors they faced in the concentration camps during the Holocaust. But also of their undying love for each other that was born out of such an awful time and place. I have read quite a bit of historical fiction about the Holocaust, but never a true story told with so much detail and raw emotion. It's so important that this story is told, painful as it may be to read, in order for us to understand what the prisoners in those camps endured in order to survive so that history may never be repeated. I urge everyone to move this book to the top of your reading stack and...

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What' a phenomenal book. It is well written, and I couldn't put it down. I can't believe the horrific things that were done to people. By the end I was bawling my eyes out. I voluntarily read and reviewed and advanced reader copy of this book from netgalley.
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A very moving story covering a period in history that must always be remembered. How one person makes a determined decision to survive in a death camp by doing whatever he needs to do.  Yet, despite the horrors that are going on around him, in a place devoid of emotion, he manages to fall in love.  His fight for survival now has even more reason.  To save himself and the girl that he loves.  Sounds crazy, but it's true.
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Such a great read! It was a little slow to start but picked up. I enjoyed this!
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They stood in a line for it was their only means of escape. Those that didn’t make the line, their fate was sealed. There were rules for those who stood in line and rules for those who processed these selected few. The room was quiet as these individuals stood waiting for their turn in front of the official table. The tattooist looked at each wrist and at the new number which would become the new identity of the individual who stood standing in front of him and he would begin his job of scratching the wrist of Auschwitz’s newest prisoner. There would be no eye contact and no words spoken. Wrist, number and scratching; all day long until the last person in the line was marked.

Papan...

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This book grabs you from the first page. The plot just keeps your attention as well as wanting to read more.
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I was so interested in the premise of the book. The real life aspect reminded me of the Liberian of Auschwitz  and it was such an interesting story. I was gripped from the first page and the way the plot continued throughout was done really well. I'm really glad i picked this up and will look forward to similar texts in the future.
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Wow, this one was so hard to put down! The author does such a great job in balancing the horrors of concentration camps with giving the people a sense of identity. I feel in a lot of things I’ve read about World War II, it’s always been in the viewpoint of overall horrors of the events that took place during that time. What was different here was that it gives the readers an insight that there was some hope and even romance during this terrible, terrible time.

While reading, I feel in love with Lale and Gita’s relationship and how it grew over time. Though we don’t learn too much about Gita and just some of Lale’s background, I found that this worked. Identity is such a major theme here...

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After reading this, I don't even know what to write. Not many books are as big of a punch to the gut as this one is. I've read a substantial amount of literature, both fiction and non-fiction regarding the Shoah. Heather Morris was chosen by a survivor of the Shoah to tell his story, and the story set forth in this novel is one of the most nuanced books I have read.

While the book is categorized as fiction, it is based on the real experiences of Lale and Gita Sokolov. Lale was taken from Slovakia to Auschwitz and Birkenau and through a series of circumstance became the man who tattooed all of those who were transported to Auschwitz and Birkenau. Rarely do books discuss the fact...

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I cannot remember the last time I read a better combination of history and story telling. Heather Morris does an amazing job in relaying the story of Lale, the man who was responsible for tattooing the numbers on prisoners entering Auschwitz, as well as the how he comes to meet the love of his life inside the camp. There are times throughout the book where a reader could easily think of it as a fictional story, that is how well Morris's writing flows.
The story itself is one of perseverance in the face of impossible odds. Of doing what one must to survive, no matter the costs. And also how little acts of kindness are never forgotten in moments of true pain and anguish, and can...

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Holocaust fiction has lately been my kryptonite, I don't know what it is about this horrific time period
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