The Tattooist of Auschwitz

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 11 Feb 2018

Member Reviews

This book definitely caught my emotions and made my heart sink a few times, but that’s what expected of books that are beautiful written and tragic. I loved this book despite the gut wrenching realities of the halocaust, but over all this book is worth reading.
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Definitely an interesting read. It's definitely not my first holocaust related memoir since there are quite a few well known ones that often enter school curriculums. It's an interesting story and definitely worth the read.
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I am a huge fan of WWII history. This book did not disappoint.   Even in the middle of hell, love proves to be stronger.  I'm in awe of their bravery and triumph over pure evil.
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A truly heart wrenching, brutal tale of the holocaust. Out of utter despair and desperation comes a tiny shard of light, a bit of hope. This is made all the more horrifying as it’s based on true events. 
We all know this sort of thing went and happened but it’s different when it’s written in black and white and put in front of you. There’s no turning away with this book.
Definitely a tear jerker and definitely worth all the hype & rave reviews.
Thank you Netgalley, the author and the publisher for my arc.
All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own.
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**I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.** 4.5 stars

""What block are you in?"" 'Nine.' How many lives does a cat have?"

This book sat in my 'To Be Read' pile for a long time. Throughout my childhood I couldn't read enough about WWII, but after finding out that both of my grandparents were prisoners and hearing their stories, the books became too real for me. Fast forward to nearly 20 years later and this is the first interaction with historical fiction on the this topic that I've touched and I loved every second I spent with this book. You know those books where your time with them feels much...

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There is no shortage of Holocaust stories and I read enough psychological thriller/suspense/mystery books so why I would be attracted to The Tattooist of Aushwitz is beyond me. Based on years of interviews between the author and Lale Sokolov (“The Tattooist” ), the story of Lale and Gita Sokolov is quite extraordinary.

Lale holds the position of “Tattooist” at Aushwitz - marking those who have a chance at survival. It is when he tattoos Gita that he falls in love at first sight and vows that he and Gita will survive and know freedom together one day. What is so striking about this book is, amid the daily horror and wretchedness, Lale never loses his integrity and compassion -...

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This story tug at my heart more so because I know it's a true story.  I can't even imagine having to tattoo numbers on the prisioners and this book provides a detailed description of what was going on at that point in time. 
Their loved story touched me as well.
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Touching, heartwrenching, tragic... even though the subject matter is horrific, the author still manages to make it a beautiful and touching book
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Amazing! Have a box of tissue ready for this one ..
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Even though the theme of this book is horrific, I love to hear how resilient people can be when put into difficult situations. How some can keep a glimmer of hope and to be able to act in a way opposite of what they normally would do to survive.
It is the true story of Lale and Gita, as Lale relays their story to the author.
It is the story of the will to live and how these two people meet and end up falling in love. Lale, soon after he arrives at Birkenau is assigned a job to help a fellow prisoner tattoo the numbers on the incoming prisoners, not a job he wants to do, but he has no choice and while tattooing some newly arrived women at the camp, he sees Gita, and he is smitten. Both of...

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Everyone's talking about this book at the moment, and with good reason.

In 1942, when the Slovakian government demanded one adult child from every Jewish family to work for the German government, Lale Eisenberg put himself forward rather than let his older, married-with-children brother, sacrifice his family life. Before he really knew what's going on, he found himself transported to Poland by cattle-train, and rudely booted into his new working life at Auschwitz-Birkenau. Even in those first hours of his concentration camp nightmare, Lale made a promise to himself that he would live to leave the place as a free man.

Despite the dire circumstances, it could be said that the...

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I have read a number of books about the Holocaust and continue to learn something new with each read. In this case, I learned about tattooists. I hadn’t really thought about the numbering/marking of prisoners until I read this book. I also assumed that German soldiers would have been tasked with this. However, from this story, I learned about Lale and other prisoners who were tasked with tattooing new arrivals at the concentration camps.

Lale’s story is deeply moving and memorable. I can’t even begin to explain the horrors that he and others witnessed and experienced at Auschwitz. I admired how he was able to do so much for his fellow prisoners despite his own confinement. Lale heroism...

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The Tattooist of Auschwitz reads like a fictional story set during the Holocaust, but what makes it remarkable is the fact that it is anything but formulated.

Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, was given the task of tattooing identification numbers on others at the notorious concentration camp. There he meets Gita, another Slovakian, and he sets himself on a mission to escape with her to freedom by trading food and jewels, revealing his incredible street smarts.
If he had been caught, he would have been killed - many owed him their survival.

There are elements where you do think it has been written for the screen, as the scenes fail to connect to one another fluidly. As a result, I did...

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There is something about books based on true stories that hit the reader harder than pure fiction. When that book is set in Auschwitz, when the book deals with the Holocaust in general--the horrors are more visceral than anything Stephen King can conjure. Amidst this dark moment in history, we get a love story. Knowing that these events actually happened with such a backdrop makes their love story even more powerful. 

Pick this book up when you have time to sit down and read or on a night when you are willing to pay the consequences of staying up reading because you will not be able to put it down. Also, have tissues handy.
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Lale is the person who tattoos the numbers on all the prisoners of Auschwitz and Birkenau. This gives him some advantages the other prisoners do not have. He has more freedom and more rations. He does his best to share with everyone. Lale is also a thief. He has to be to survive. Gita is another prisoner. She meets Lale when he tattoos her arm. This changes their lives forever.

When I read a holocaust book, it always brings forefront...Man's inhumanity to man. This book is no different. The starvation, the intelligence to survive, the pure meanness of the Nazis always amaze me. Lale and Gita have to be tough and smart to survive. And they did survive and find their way back to each...

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Like most Holocaust stories, this is sad and disturbing but the stories have to be told. We will never forget what happened to these people.
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A ghost-written memoir of a life interrupted, of perseverance and endurance, of finding love and holding onto it through one of the worst cases of genocide recorded.

The story its self -being a true version of events as recalled by Lale - can't be judged.

The portrayal of the story was rather dry and unemotional. Giving so little of the Lale and Gita's personalities - whether because Lale himself tended to keep his emotions private, or perhaps the ghost-writers style - was a risk, and not one worth taking. History has an awful tendency to repeat its self and the horrific events that took place in the concentration camps don't stand alone. Similar atrocities have and will...

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I’ve read quite a bit about the Holocaust, but I believe this is the first time I have read about a romance in Auschwitz concentration camp. The camp is full of hunger, despair and fear -- not really the atmosphere that encourages amorous thoughts. Most prisoners were consumed with the need to survive. However, love is a powerful motivator for the will to survive.

Lale Sokolov, a young man from Slovakia, was sent to Auschwitz to work. Fluent in several languages and possessing a charisma that others found appealing, Lale soon unwittingly lands the job of tattooing numbers onto the incoming prisoners. The freedom to move about the camp, extra rations and a better place to sleep set...

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At the beginning of this book, the author dedicates the book to 'To the memory of Lale Sokolov. Thank you for trusting me to tell your and Gita's story.' and at the end of the book, she talks with Lale about how she came about writing his story. She seems grateful if you ignore the entire story in between. You see, on the cover of this book was a sticker that said: 'Based on an incredible true story' which means that some of this book isn't true. It's made up to help the story, and now, we the reader cannot be sure which bits are true and which bits are not. As many people are aware with concentration camps during the second world war, we can easily deduce...

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it seems wrong to love a book based on such a harrowing story based on true life. but whilst I loved the book its also a stark reminder of the awful atrocities of the concentration camps.  beautifully told and I couldn't wait to read the book from cover to cover.  recommending it you anyone I talk to.
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