The Hawkman

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 04 Jun 2018

Member Reviews

I heard nothing but great things about this book, so I felt quite disappointing when it wasn't this perfect book that I was expecting. I think when it started, it was a solid 5 star read, but towards the end it lost that touch. The ending wasn't super cohesive, and it felt a little rushed and confusing.

It focuses quite a lot on PTSD following the Great War, and deals with compassion and forgiveness and acceptance. I liked the message that it was probably trying to portray, and this aspect was done really well. I think if the ending had been a bit more captivating it would've received a higher rating. I loved the magical realism in it, and I did love the relationship between...

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The Hawkman is a retelling of a mix of Beauty and the Beast meets Grimm’s Fairy Tales (look up certain title). It’s a fascinating, bewitching tale of a man that’s a beggar on the streets; abused by children and adults alike because of how ugly he is perceived to be, as well as how dangerous. He doesn’t talk, only screams at people-much like a hawk-which is where the name originates from.

It is described as a “fairy tale of the great war”, and it certainly doesn’t flinch from telling the dark stories of how men survived while fighting enemies, and deserting, and struggling just to get by. It’s a harsh look at the war, and at how some soldiers were treated during these times of strife. It...

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Book Description
A great war, a great love, and the mythology that unites them; The Hawkman: A Fairy Tale of the Great War is a lyrical adaptation of a beloved classic.

Set against the shattering events of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, at the tale’s heart are an American schoolteacher—dynamic and imaginative—and an Irish musician, homeless and hated—who have survived bloodshed, poverty, and sickness to be thrown together in an English village. Together they quietly hide from the world in a small cottage.

My Thoughts
The Hawkman is just one more reason that I am glad to have 'discovered' Buzz Books. This was featured in the Spring/Summer 2018 edition and if the...

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A magical realist tale set during the Great War and sporting a cover this beautiful could not fail to appeal to me! What I initially loved about this, however, failed to continue to enthral me. This story was, perhaps, too quiet in its telling, for me. As evocative as the writing was and as sublime as the story-line continued to be, there was an almost treacle-like quality to the pacing that often had me wishing to pull myself free and hurry ahead rather than sit still and appreciate the current sweetness that surrounded me.
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I raced through this book as I was completely hooked by the story and wanted to see how it resolved... although there were some very large hints near the start so I could see what was coming, what I wanted was to see how we got there. This book is beautifully written and therefore enjoyable to read. It tells the story of Michael "the Hawkman" who is suffering from PTSD following his experiences in the trenches of the First World War and prisoner of war camps, and Eva, an American teacher in rural England, and the relationship between them. It's a fairy story and a love story and quite lovely. The only thing missing is, I think, a bit more of the actual Hawkman. There's a...

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I wasn't a particularly big fan of this book, but it's not so much because it was a bad book per say and more because it just wasn't my thing. There's definitely a specific kind of reader who would love this book; that reader is just not me.

The Hawkman follows the lives of a Mr. Sheehan (the title character) and Miss Williams, who live in England shortly after World War 1. Mr. Sheehan is a former soldier and prisoner of war; his time in the war left him essentially traumatized and homeless. He wanders the streets of this tiny English village, homeless, and he terrifies most of the residents just because of his size and refusal to speak, though this "Hawkman"...

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The Hawkman: A Fairy Tale of the Great War

Jane Rosenberg LaForge
AmberJack Pub.
ISBN: 978-1944995676 (paperback)
280p
Released: June 5, 2018

The Hawkman: A Fairy Tale of the Great War by Jane Rosenberg LaForge is a re-telling of several Grimm’s fairy tales against the backdrop of World War I. As a fan of World War I literature, this captures the desperation of trench warfare, the aftermath of war, and what it means to live with those nightmares. But it is this reality, this darkness, this desperation that pushes up against how and why people tell stories. This is not merely a war novel, but the war is what triggers much of the action and ideas around this novel. Miss Eva Williams...

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The subtitle of this book is A fairytale of the Great War - and it is just that - reminiscent of a fairy tale. The prose in which it is written strikes a chord that has only been equaled by that of the brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen. You are transported to a time when nothing was known of PTSD and the after effects of war and when “shell-shock” was treated in very different ways.
The friendship that arises between Miss Williams and the Hawkman is touching and gentle.
Reminiscent at time of Swan Lake and other famous fairytales, the descriptions are rich and luxurious. The book is a fast read because you want to find out the culmination of the story and what becomes of both...

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What a wonderful book! I was hooked since the first page and cannot put it down.
The style of writing was really good and the characters really interesting.
It's strongly recommended!
Many thanks to Amberjack Publishing and Netgalley
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This was a beautifully written story about interesting characters, but it wasn’t my favorite kind of book.  The long flashbacks got tedious at times, and I wanted to know more about the current story.  But this book is well-written and a good example of a slow, thought out story. 

I received a copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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There is really no way to describe The Hawkman other than bittersweet. It is such a sad but sweet story. The two main characters, Miss Eva Williams and Mr. Michael Sheehan/The Hawkman could not be more interesting and I really connected with them and their relationship. This story is just so beautifully written I almost don't have the words to describe it. While it is described as a fairy tale, it doesn't feel like the fairy tales I grew up with. Maybe it's because there's no princesses or witches in it that I normally associate with that label. But the label doesn't really matter. The Hawkman is a brilliant story with a wonderful message. But before I get rambly...

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The Hawkman by Jane Rosenberg LaForge is an original and powerfully written reworking of the Grimm's fairy tale Bearskin. The novel departs from the fairy tale in a lot of ways, and not having any prior knowledge of the earlier fable doesn't detract in any way from this novel.

The author is a poet and it shines through in the exquisite use of language. Most of the prose in the book is transcendent and very 'painterly'. It's a fantasy, but grounded in reality. I wouldn't call it magical realism, exactly (with the exception of one passage, which seemed written to indicate that it was metaphorical, not literal).

The book is beautifully written and poignant...

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I received a copy of this book from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.

The Hawkman was beautifully written, immediately captivating me with its lyrical prose. Jane Rosenberg LaForge creates a fairytale within a fairytale; the stories etched within the narrative kept pulling me deeper and deeper into the story.
When the lives of the town's two misfits, the mute vagabond, Mr. Sheehan and the American spinster Miss Williams, come together both undergo transformations that have consequences neither could have foreseen. There is a nod the the classic tale of "Beauty and the Beast" but focuses on the cost of helping a beast return from a nature that tragedy had forced...

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it is not my kind of books to read, however I did enjoy it and it was beautiful written. The story line was also interesting.
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I’d like to thank Netgalley for this copy of The Hawkman in exchange for a fair review. 

It’s a bold attempt to link fairytale with historical fiction. 

The language is gorgeous and the setting unique ( as The Great War is often over looked). The author braids fairytale with the grit of war. 

While that braid doesn’t always seem to fit, I couldn’t fault the author for her creativity. The only sticking point for me was the constant switch between past and present tense.
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A beautiful historical fiction book with a tad of fantasy/folklore set post WW1. I enjoyed it quite a bit - the growing relationship between the protagonists, the slight sense of a fairytale and overall well-written prose.

I received a copy via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.
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This book I struggled through.  I don't think I care for the popular fairy tale setting of novels dealing with real issues.  The imagery is well done and is the book's strong point.
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I want to start this review by saying a big thank you to NetGalley for giving me an early copy of this book, this is the first book I have read as an ARC and I was really excited about it. I also think, upon reflection that I read this book way too fast and I really wonder how my interpretation of this book might have changed if I had taken my time a bit more with this novel. 

This novel is, as its tagline says, a fairy tale. It mixes folklore with historical fiction in a really seamless blend that really builds a beautiful scene, the way the context and story unfold in this novel really is lovely. The language used is undeniably pretty and this book is one that really has a genuine sense...

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