The Antique Dealer’s Daughter

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 09 Oct 2018

Member Reviews

This historic novel is set just after WW2 with Emily, the daughter, as the main character.  She is trying to regroup after living in London during the conflict as she was too old to be evacuated and too young to be put to work. She goes to stay with her cousin in the Cotswolds but when she arrives she finds her cousin is in hospital in Gloucester. Then her adventure begins all because she’s trying to find a telephone she can hear ringing, which turns out to be in the deserted Manor house.  This book has it all - mysteries, secrets and romance.  The only downside for me was I felt the writing style was a bit old fashioned for the time it was set in and I had to keep re reading some of the sentences to fully understand what was going on, but overall a charming read.
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Thanks to netgalley for an early copy  in return for an honest review.
I Was looking forward to reading this book  but I found it to be slightly  confusing in parts and rather disjointed  in other parts. I had a hard time getting into this story.
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A beautifully descriptive novel, but I had trouble keeping up with things because of so much description. It is historically accurate and would have been delightfully charming, but I kept getting bogged down in the wordiness of it. Maybe it was just me, but I feel that a good 30% could be condensed down. It was still a nice story and interesting characters.
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I loved this book and did not want it to end.  I don't say that about many books, but this author is superb.  The story was interesting and the writing style was well done.  I look forward to reading more by this author.  Very good book!
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Excellent book with a great storyline.  Characters that are so well written. I would highly recommend this book to anyone!
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Thanks to netgalley for an early copy  in return for an honest review 
Was looking forward to reading this book  slightly  confusing in parts and rather disjointed  but none the less quite a good read I would recommend  this book to others
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The Antique Dealer's Daughter was my first book by Lorna Grey, it was given to me from NetGalley for an honest review.  I am sorry to say that I was not a huge fan, I found it very long, and drawn out.  That being said, I would still give her next novel a look.
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I feel bad, but I really could not finish this book.
I found the writing style to be confusing and hard to follow. 

The story is an interesting one: Emily is a young woman living in post WW2 London. Her parents suggest her to go and live with her cousin. When she arrives there, she discovers an older man who has been beaten over the head.  She meets Captain Richard Langton,  and decides to become the housekeeper. While making lunch for the Colonel, she interrupts a burglary and is hit on the head herself.
i didn't make it much past this point, but will try to pick it up again another time.
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In The Antique Dealer's Daughter we are introduced to Emily, who with a mind of her own, doesn't always see eye to eye with her parents. Her father would prefer it if she followed him into the antique business but Emily refuses to conform to tradition. In desperation, her parents send Emily to stay with an unmarried cousin who lives in a cottage in the Cotswolds, but when Emily arrives to an empty cottage, she finds that she is inadvertently involved in a rather dark mystery which is haunted by a scandal from the past

The author writes with great enthusiasm and clearly does her research well as both time and place are nicely described and, within the 1940s setting, there is a real sense of history. As with this author's previous stories, the mystery is complicated and there is much to take in, both in terms of character and plot, but, as always, the strength of the lead female character does much to carry the story forward. The adventure is filled with twists and turns and Emily finds that she needs to keep one step ahead of the game. I found the story a little over descriptive at times. and it takes a while for the story to settle. however, once I got used to the author's distinct style of writing, I started to enjoy the book.

The author seems to be developing a niche for this type of historical mystery/adventure and I look forward to seeing what she writes next.
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Emily is a fairly strong young woman, trying to find her path after the war on her own and not join her father's antique business. Sent to stay with an aunt, she finds an empty cottage. Parts of the story dragged a bit, I did some skimming in the middle as it was hard to keep my interest with lots of the descriptive prose.
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Thank you NetGalley for the Opportunity to read The Antique Dealer’s Daughter by Lorna Gray.  This was my first book by the author.  I will not give you any spoilers. It held my attention and it was an enjoyable read. If you get the chance you should check it out.
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Emily is the antique dealer’s daughter, who is the main character and the only thing that has to do with the title. This novel takes place in post WWII England. Teenage Emily spent the war in London too old to be evacuated and to young to help with the cause. With the war over, older Emily needs to find herself. Leaving her parents home to live with her spinster cousin in Cotswolds she arrives to find her cousin Phyllis in the hospital with a broken wrist after having had a bicycle accident. As walking on the way to her cousin’s cottage she comes involved with the aftermath of a mugging. Add the mystery of vandalism, death and mysteries makes this story very intriguing. I did have to look up a bunch of British words and slang which was no trouble. I highly recommend.
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Enjoyable read although slightly confusing at times.
The 'daughter' could have been anyone daughter the Antique Dealer' really didn't have much to do with the story.
Plenty of red herrings but even so the outcome was fairly predictable.

I wouldn't rush out to buy this book but readable if down loaded or given to you.
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I have a mixed reaction to this book.  I loved the two main characters, Emily Sutton and Richard Langton, as well as the story of life post World War II.  However, the early chapters were exceptionally wordy, and dialogue was more reflective of the 1800’s than post war.  There were many twists and turns to figuring out who was good and who was evil, which kept me reading.
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Gray’s third historical novel takes place in the postwar Cotswolds, a place whose bucolic appearance conceals a difficult past. In 1947, Emily Sutton, a Londoner in her early twenties, arrives to stay with her older cousin, Phyllis. Her parents hope that seeing Phyllis’s unmarried state will deter Emily from pursuing an independent life. Things don’t quite work out as planned. After finding Phyllis’s cottage empty, Emily stumbles upon an elderly neighbor lying on a garden path and with a bleeding head wound. Later that day, she makes the fateful decision to answer the incessant ringing of the telephone at the manor house on the village’s far side. Both events bring her into the company of locals who clearly share some tangled secrets. Captain Richard Langton, son of the Colonel who is the lord of the manor, is simultaneously puzzled by her presence in his father’s home, grateful for the help she offers, and protective of her safety – since someone dangerous is out there. The attacks may relate somehow to Richard’s late brother, John, and rumors of his criminal behavior.

It sounds like an alluring recipe for romantic suspense in a classic English village setting, but its execution falls short. The first chapter starts off promisingly, and the novel’s strongest aspects are Emily’s reflections on postwar life. She was a teenager during the war and struggles with guilt over her forced passivity; she was too young to serve. Also, her knowledge that the men she passes on peacetime streets may have taken human lives creates an uneasy tension. However, the novel is overstuffed with her constant ruminations on people and events; she overthinks everything and shares it all in plentiful detail. This slows the pacing to a crawl. The story would have been a stronger, sharper novel if pared down by half.

(from the Historical Novels Review, August 2018)
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Steeped in historical detail and authentic characters you could undoubtedly find in post-war Britain, 'The Antique Dealer's Daughter' follows Emily's endeavours as she forges a life for herself in the rural idyll of the Cotswolds.

World War 2 changed lives and gave women chances and certain emancipation that would have happened much more slowly without the impetus of the war. This story illustrates this and the frustration many women felt when they were expected to return to their post-war roles. The post-war era and life in the rural Cotswolds immerse the reader, but the slow pacing and length of the story sometimes negate the powerful messages both social and political and the depth of the characters.

It's not an easy read, there is perhaps a little too much historical detail and the characters' behaviour and attitudes, while realistic makes them hard to understand and empathise. The mystery and the danger the heroine finds herself in underlines the story but only seeing it from Emily's point of view reduces its impact; always being in her head is often confusing for the reader.

If you are a devotee of historical fiction in the 1940s, this is an absorbing read, but if you are more interested in solving the crimes and mystery, you may find it difficult to discover and keep the clues in your mind. The romance is gentle and rather lovely, entirely in keeping with the period.

I received a copy of this book from Harper Impulse via NetGalley in return for an honest review.
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I enjoyed reading about Emily's journey to find her place in the world after World War 2.  She did not want to follow in her father's footsteps, so she travels with her cousin.  This book highlights their adventures.  I really enjoyed this one.
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I really enjoyed the rare setting of rural WWII Britain and thought this looked like a great book. Unfortunately, the style is incredibly descriptive and convoluted. It's too hard to follow the action. I struggled to about the 60% mark and ultimately DNF-ed it. Sorry that I can't recommend it.

Many thanks to NetGalley, the author, and the publisher for my ARC. All opinions are my own.
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Sorry to say I cannot finish this book.  It is jumbled writing and doesn’t make any sense.  I also didn’t connect with the few characters in the short amount I read.  If it was maybe shorter in length I would possibly stick with it but it is extremely too long to even consider.
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This book takes up the story of the Langton’s that was started a few months earlier in In the Shadow of Winter” which I read a few years ago. I was confused when it began, despite having read and enjoyed the earlier book, and my confusion never really eased the farther I read. The heroine’s POV is all we see but we see plenty of it as Emily Sutton has to ponderously think through everything, then rethink her assumptions and then finally catch what she really believes is going on. Everyone is tight lipped about their feelings and actions leading to endless misunderstandings. 

I liked that the setting is a little used one – post World War II Britain in the countryside – and that the story incorporates the social and political changes they were grappling with. Unfortunately the more convoluted the story became and the longer the plot twisted around on itself and bogged down in endless pages of discussion and Emily’s observations, the less I came to care what was going on. I finally surrendered at the 2/3 mark. DNF
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