The Nowhere Child

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 12 Jun 2018

Member Reviews

3.5 **** This was a really interesting premise for a story, the end had a twist I definitely was not expecting. The only thing I really didn't like was how quickly Kim decided to look into what Stuart, a complete stranger had told her and then accept it, I found that a bit far fetched. Besides that though, I enjoyed the dual timelines, I think I preferred the 'then' timeline slightly more as I was so interested to find out what happened. I recommend this book if you enjoy a good crime/mystery. 

Thanks to NetGalley and Hachette Australia for a copy in return for an honest review.
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This is an incredible psychological thriller that moves between two time periods of Now (2018) and Then (1990) and between USA and Australia. A two year old girl, Sammy Went, disappears in a small town called Manson, Kentucky and twenty-eight years later her brother Stuart is in Melbourne, Australia confronting Kim who he claims is that missing child.

What unfolds is spell binding and the author creates an atmosphere of suspense and tension. With twists and turns happening all through the story, the ending leaves you mesmerised as it was so unpredictable - so WOW!!

With well developed characters, an intriguing story line and a easy to read writing style this comes in the highly...

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Two-year-old Sammy Went lived with her mother and father, sister Emma and brother Stuart – three days after her second birthday, Sammy vanished. Even with the dedicated search which went for weeks; the police called from areas surrounding the small town of Manson, Kentucky; Sammy was never seen again – the case was never solved.

Twenty-eight years later, in Melbourne, Australia, Kim Leamy was enjoying a break from her classes when a stranger approached her. In that instant Kim’s life changed and everything she’d believed about herself and her family were shattered. Questions she asked of her step-father couldn’t be answered to Kim’s satisfaction; her mother had passed away four years...

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Rating: 4 stars

Review: I went into this book not quite sure what to expect, and was pleasantly surprised when I got a book that read as well as The Nowhere Child did. The book follows Kim, an Australian university teacher, who is approached one day by a man believing her to be Sammy Went, a child who was abducted from America when she was two and never seen again. What follows is a story that takes you across the world and across time, with twists and turns that will keep you guessing until the end.

The story was beautifully written, feeling natural and real and helping to absorb the reader into the lives of Kim and the Wents. It's hard to remember that these are made-up characters...

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An intriguing and compelling read from start to finish. I could not put this book down. I had to find out what came next. The characters are believable and interesting. The twists and turns in the plot are beguiling. The mysteries that are presented are gripping; while the book eventually comes to a satisfying climax. I highly recommend this book for lovers of mystery, intrigue, murder and who dunnits.
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This is the story that could have happened to anyone of us. Every one of us could have been lost and found or never found. Any child could have been taken to be tortured or taken to be saved as in the case of The Nowhere Child.

Reading this book one constant thought niggled at my brain: we have it easy. I have it easy. All the teenage angst, all the pain and conflict of living in the broken family an adapting to step-father, all the moving and changing schools, all the operations and bullying at school - are nothing comparing to what kids went through this tiny, quiet and peaceful town of Manson. 

Reaching from the States to Australia, from tiny Manson to metropolis of Melbourne, this...

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Thanks I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Great story line, interesting characters who seem to get more interesting the more you read.
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How would you feel if you found out that everything you believed about your family was a lie? Shocked? Confused? Betrayed? Perhaps all of those, and more. When a stranger turns up on Kim Leamy’s doorstep in Melbourne, telling her that he has reason to believe that she might be Sammy Went, a little girl who disappeared at the age of two from her home in Manson, Kentucky, never to be seen again, she dismisses it as a bad joke at first. However, her mother has recently passed away, and there are some niggling questions about her childhood Kim cannot answer. As evidence mounts, Kim knows that there is only one way to find out – to go to America herself and retrace Sammy’s last steps.

Am I the...

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The fact that is Christian White's debut novel astounded me. His writing is superb, so I will definitely be keeping my eyes open for his future works.

The Nowhere Child was told using two defined timelines, both the past and the present. These were meticulously interwoven and in no way did the story feel disorientating or disconnected. The flow was simply sublime.

This is the story of Kim Leamy, who is told that at the age of two she disappeared and her original name was Sammy Went. Kin is disbelieving of this information and begins to conduct her own investigation to uncover the truth. The story is often predictable, however there were numerous twists that were unexpected and kept...

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I thoroughly enjoyed this story, much more than I thought I would.  The alternating of the past and present stories set in both Melbourne and the US were equally as engaging and the way the author threaded them together was quite amazing. The ending was well executed and I was literally taken by surprise. The author did a great job of moving the story forward at a decent pace to keep you wanting more. I almost forgot the author was male as he did get his female characters down pat. To find out this book is Christian White’s debut is impressive and he will definitely be a name to look out for in future.
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Whilst I liked the twists in this, the actual writing didn't captivate me. There were too many characters, and you didn't get enough of them to connect with. The sub plot with Ellis was also stuck in that middle ground of almost-connection. I understand why it was partly needed, but it could have been done better.
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Wow! I could not put this book down. I loved the characters and the story. I loved how each chapter alternated between the present and the past cleverly keeping you hanging and wanting to read more. This book is screaming to be made into a movie! Excellent read.
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This book pulled me in from the start.  I did not want to put it down, and when I did, I spent a lot of time trying to work out how it all happened.  Great characters, well written, and not just one, but two surprises at the end.  Thoroughly enjoyed and highly recommend The Nowhere Child.
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I was initially interested in reading The Nowhere Child because it won the Victorian Premier’s Literary Award. It has a great premise that immediately made me want to know more. The concept of someone coming to you saying that you could be a missing child from another country is very creepy yet interesting.

The main character is Kim, the woman who has been told that she is really Sammy Went. I found her character to be sympathetic; however, the other characters that are introduced become a bit more interesting. Although this is the case, I preferred reading the novel from Kim's perspective. There were a lot of characters in the parts set in the past, which, at times, made it...

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This was a compulsive read that grabbed me from the beginning as Kim begins to try and find out what happened to the little girl Sammy and why the stranger believes that she is that girl. The atmosphere of the Southern town of Manson is vividly described and the reader is taken into the home of the Went family, its problems and the deep religious beliefs of the Went mother. The religious cult of snake handling is explored in detail that is quite disturbing. It makes the story darker and more fascinating than many other mystery thrillers that are available.
Not for the faint hearted, The nowhere child will have readers on the edge of their seats as Kim traces step by step the journey that...

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The Nowhere Child has the same effect that The Dry had on me the first time I read it. It had me wondering where on earth this author has been and why we had to wait for him to win the Victorian Premier's Unpublished Manuscript Award to discover his glorious writing? In case you don't recall, The Dry came about in the same way (by winning the award and subsequently being released). The characters are very well-developed. The suspense and mystery are strong. And the writing has this quality to it. Readers looking for the next big thriller will definitely want to check out The Nowhere Child.
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The Victorian Premier’s Unpublished Manuscript Award has been discovering some of Australia’s favourite authors. Some recent recipients include Jane Harper’s The Dry and Graeme Simsion’s The Rosie Project. So when Christian White’s manuscript titled Decay Theory picked up the award in 2017, publishers sat up and took notice. And for goods reason. Now renamed the more catchy The Nowhere Child, White’s novel is an assured crime thriller with a well constructed mystery at its heart.

The hook for The Nowhere Child comes early and hits hard and sustains any bumps in the narrative. In Melbourne, 30 year-old photography teacher Kim Leamy is approached by an American stranger. He tells her that...

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What a fabulous read I was hooked from the beginning to end and to add to my delight Aussie humour came filtering through (sometimes a mystery to those from other countries). The story crosses over two time zones, two countries and two completely different ways of life. All the elements are there, suspense, love, hate, murder and to top it off a bit of weird religious fundamentals. Kim on the whole has a pretty ordinary life with a close knit family who together are still trying to recover from the death of their mother. That is until one day a stranger from another country turns Kim’s world upside down telling her that he believes she isn’t who she thinks she is and that he knows her real...

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‘Mind if I join you?’

Kim Leamy is a photography teacher in Melbourne, Australia. She’s taking a break between classes when she’s approached by a stranger. He shows her a photograph:

‘Her name is Sammy Went. This photo was taken on her second birthday. Three days later she was gone.’

He says that he is investigating the disappearance of Sammy Went from her home in Kentucky twenty-eight years earlier. He believes that Kim is Sammy. Kim believes that he is mistaken, but when she starts looking into her family background she finds that some questions can’t be easily answered. Kim has happy memories of her childhood with loving parents. But she can find no photographs of herself as a...

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Here you are coming up to 30 years of age and you think you have your life together, you are teaching photography, have a place of your own and a loving family. Then one day a male stranger sits down in front of you and says, ‘you are my long lost sister who disappeared over 28 years ago.’ Well, that would certainly turn your life upside down and that is exactly what happens to Kimberly Leamy. For Kim has to know the truth and leaves Australia to head back to Manson, USA to discover the truth about who she is.
White has crafted an intriguing mystery thriller that keeps throwing doubts and suspicions on a cast of fascinating characters. The story is told via switching from ‘now’ to ‘then’...

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