The Water Cure

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 22 Jan 2019

Member Reviews

A mystical debut of somber love and lethal control.

Three sisters live on an island with their Mother. Their father has just disappeared and is assumed dead. They know this because he left their island to gather supplies from the toxic world that surrounds their haven. But it is not so simple. There is a certain relief in his departure due to his harshly devised and ever present "cures" to keep his family safe. But in his wake, their Mother takes the lead and follows his example. The pain repeats in his image.

Everything changes when two men and a boy wash ashore. Quickly, their household traditions fall wayside. What was once clean becomes a mess. Their Mother leaves for...

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This book tells the story of three sisters; Grace, Lia, and Sky.  They have been raised by their parents, King and Mother, apart from the rest of society, which their parents have told them is damaged and damaging.  Their parents force them to do all sorts of self-destructive rituals, which they say are good for them and they also drug them.  The story is unclear about what really is happening in the rest of the world.  Their father, King, has died, three men wash up on the shore, and soon afterwards their mother disappears and the three girls are left to deal with the men on their own.  Part dystopian novel and part psychological thriller, this novel tells a unique story.
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This book is about three little girls who are basically kept alone from the rest of the world, and sheltered with their mother and father. The book was a little weird getting into, and hard for me to understand as it was a "new world" than what I was used to. I would give this book 4/5 stars. Thanks for the chance to read it!
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Interesting place setting.  I would have liked more of the family's history flushed out.  I felt I was only reading topical and not getting a true understanding.  I did like the crazy feel of the father figure and the interesting way the author had him brainwash the women.  Readers of the Handmaid's Tale may find this interesting, but wanting more.
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The Water Cure: "Atmospheric"

Overview: “The Handmaid's Tale meets The Virgin Suicides in this dystopic feminist revenge fantasy about three sisters on an isolated island, raised to fear men.” The rest of the summary on the book sleeve is extremely vague, which is fitting since the book itself raises more questions than answers.

Three sisters whose ages are unknown (to us AND to them) have lived isolated on an island for their entire lives, where their parents run a sort of safe house for women recovering from violence. Ironically, their mother & father have taught them to suppress their feelings through tortuous and violent outlets (including the ‘drowning game’ and...

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I do my best to write good reviews for every book I read. I understand how hard it is for the writer to pour out part of their soul into the story. How the characters come alive and tell the writer their story and that the author is a conduit for them. Truly, I do understand. Unfortunately I am unable to write a good review for this book. Though the characters were well written and decently defined, I felt that there was more to the story that needed to be told in this book in order for everything to fall into place and make sense.

The description of the book makes you believe that there is gonna be a huge story in the book yet the entire time I was reading it all I was was thinking was...

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The Water Cure is a difficult book to review. It is so different from what I usually read, yet I was gripped by the strange story from the start. The writing is elegant and the way the plot unfolds has me eagerly turning the pages, wanting to know what would happen next. It is a truly creative and captivating story, and I certainly recommend it!
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Mackintosh writes in absolutely beautiful and unflinching prose about the desolation and destruction of a family.

The book is set in a remote, seaside home of a family of a father (King), a mother (Mother), and three sisters (Lia, Grace, and Sky). The sisters are raised in isolation and are taught by their parents to fear, hate, and avoid men. They're told that interacting with men would make them physically sick, and it is unclear throughout the story whether this is true or not in their world, due to the isolation the reader experiences along with the sisters. Ironically, their father, is the oligarch of the family, and uses physical and emotional abuse to ensure complete control.
...

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This book was wholly original, and entirely captivating. I am looking forward to writing a more lengthy review for my blog at the end of the week, and then I will update here as well! Sophie Mackintosh killed it.
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The Water Cure is a story of 3 sisters who have been kept save from men and the "toxins" of the outside world.  Their home appears to once have been a spa used for healing women of these toxins and damages brought on by men by using The Water Cure. 

Sophie Mackintosh uses the voice of each of the sisters to tell their part of the story, each from their own perspective, building on layers of truths, memory,  lies and perceptions.

The book was compelling and made for a fast read.  Ultimately, it left the reader with more questions than answers.
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This book was unlike any other book I've read, at least recently. Sophie does a wonderful job on immersing you into the story of 3 young women discovering their themselves while tucked away from the rest of society.
Growing up in a world unlike any other with the threat of what men are capable of, Lia, Sky, and Grace uncover the truths of their parents and the lies they were told to keep them right where they are. Maybe when the plan was in its infancy it sounded like a way to protect the young girls. Yet, with their ideas of proving one's love with painful and horrific tests the young women find themselves more confused with life and knowing who they can trust and where they...

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For such an evasively written novel, this book was fairly intriguing. I became interested in this book when I saw it was compared to The Handmaids Tale meets The Virgin Suicides. 

As mentioned before the plot was rather evasive in letting you know anything direct but that's what makes this story work so well. This novel raises many tensions as you question what is really going on physically  and psychologically. 

The shades of gray vs the black and white, clear cut ending did leave me wanting more and some things answered, however in a good way. This is a hard thing o pull off in books and I felt the author did a tremendous job of balancing it all in a poetic way.

The plot itself...

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Three girls and their parents live alone on a supposed island. Taught that men are disease ridden things to be avoided at all costs.

There are drills, treatments and oh, yeah...the are all crazy as loons. We are left to figure out how they got there, why they are here and who knocked one of them up???

Honestly we are given no details. No questions were answered and you are left to interpret what is going on. And there is something going on and since I have no idea what, I'm going to say it was some type of cultish abuse going on.

But who knows. When I was finished I felt like I had wasted hours on an unfinished and unedited story. Told only from the viewpoints of the three sisters...

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The Water Cure is about three sisters living on an island with Mother and "King", isolated from the rest of the world. They grow up learning the mainland is toxic, making women physically ill, and that men are not to be trusted. They perform rituals, or therapies, to rid their bodies of possible toxins and as prevention from any they may encounter. They grow up enclosed by the barbed wire fence and the buoys with the words Do not enter. Or viewed from another angle: Not safe to leave. Their world is turned upside down when King disappears, and three strange men show up on the shore. Told in first person perspective from two of the sisters, Lia and Grace, and interlaced with...

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I don't even know how many stars to give this. I'm not even sure what I just read. It was NOTHING like the description that's for sure. I was expecting some "go get em girl" crosses Mad Max. The only thing this can be described as is extreme Stockholm Syndrome meets Stranger Things with some psych ward journaling thrown in. Asides from being extremely hard to read language wise - jumping between third person and first person, viewpoint to viewpoint etc. it took until about 3/4 of the way (when the men arrived) through the book for me to even find something considering a plot. I still haven't got a clue if they're in a post ap world or if King was simply...

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This was such a strange yet brilliant book. It hooked me in from the beginning because it was so different from anything I recall reading. It felt like a novel I’d be assigned to read for an English Literature class, filled with symbolism and a dystopian feminist theme. At first it seemed almost cult-like — they’re extremely paranoid about pretty much everything including getting sick or being harmed from all the “toxins” around them. The women and King are also always dressed in white, I imagine white symbolizing "purity" against those said toxins.

There were times were I also felt this novel was a little bit more sinister than I anticipated. Mother treats her daughters...

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The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters who live a secluded, and strange, life on a perceived island. On this island, the sisters are educated by their father and mother on the abusive and toxic life that women are forced to live on the mainland. That if they were not careful they would become sick with disease from the radicals in the air or if touched by someone other than themselves. Lastly men, especially, are to be feared as they are created and made to harm women. Becoming contaminated is greatly emphasized while reading.

Immediately you realize that something is not quite right with this family, nor the island, and you begin to feel uneasy while reading. Every so often the...

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I read the first few pages and gave up. I have no patience for a book this confusing. I liked the premise from the blurb, but I wasn't willing to navigate the confusion.
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Honestly, I'm sort of speechless. I read this book in about 3 hours, and now I feel like I need to sit with my feelings about it for 3 days.

The story is a radical feminist allegory, a dark fairytale that will probably resonate most with women. Not that men shouldn't read it--they should...They should witness the simmering rage beneath Mackintosh's words, and understand that this rage is something many women feel every day, just moving about in the world. Some of the passages were so profoundly truthful and cathartic that I had to stop reading for a few minutes just to turn them over in my head again. "Yes! THIS!" I wanted to scream, every single time.

The...

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The Water Cure is billed as a mystery and I would safely say that that is true, though maybe not in the way the author intended. It follows three sisters, with three separate voices and perspectives as the reader is taken on a journey of exploration.

Some books are snacks. Some are desserts. This is a seven-course meal. The language is at times very beautiful and poetic. Pieces coming out in short verses seemingly. It isn’t an quick and easy read, one will have to savior the meaning and the language.

However, what makes this a mystery is that the reader doesn’t always know what is happening. The ending isn’t satisfying. I literally caught myself scratching me head at the end.

There...

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