Kid Gloves

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 26 Feb 2019

Member Reviews

The author begins her story by stating she just had a baby four weeks ago. This simple statement becomes enormously significant as she unfolds her tale. The troubles with getting pregnant, the miscarriages, her heartbreak, and her journey make for such a compelling story. I read it in a single sitting. She points out early in the work how she shared her misfortunes with other graphic artists, Leela Coleman, and Thi Bui are just to name a few. In between each section, sh reveals a little pregnancy research and demonstrates how much we know comes from such barbarity. The speculum was invented by experimenting on slaves using spoons. Natural childbirth came ouf of a desire for women to feel pain in childbirth as part of the punishment for original sin. she juxtaposes this research with her modern medicine experience and finds too many similarities. Ultimately, her doctor's dismissive attitude towards her symptoms lead to pre-eclampsia and her almost dying. It's definitely a call to examine how women are treated by modern medicine. (I also read this right before reading Invisible Women so that will really upset you.)

It isn't all hardship as she adds her humor and kindness throughout the story. It seems that this is something that should be read along with What to Expect When You are Expecting and to remember that one should be kind to oneself and treat yourself with kid gloves.
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My favorite from Knisley so far. She captures the complex emotional labyrinth of motherhood. Will have a broad appeal.
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Loved this book! Lucy Knisley never fails to bring me joy with your graphic novel memoirs. I love getting a glimpse into her life, whether the picture painted is happy or heartbreaking.
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Kid Gloves is a moving story about the process of trying to conceive and have a baby. It covered aspects of female reproductive health that I don't remember ever being told about at school (had to find out about them myself as an adult) in a straightforward way. I liked the illustrations too. Unfortunately the format made the text a bit hard to read - I had to zoom in to read the text then out again to go to the next page, which made for a stilted reading experience. I imagine that's probably better with the version you pay for.
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My favorite graphic memoir from Lucy Knisley! It's emotional and funny, personal but accessible; with the occasional addition of history to broaden the context of an otherwise individual story. The visual storytelling is clear and charming, so I hope a lot of non-graphic novel reader pick it up - I know they'd love it if they did!
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This isn't a subject I'd put a lot of thought into, apart from the obligatory health class in high school and the complications a few close family members experienced. Much like Knisley, I had sec ed that was pretty one dimensional, focusing on preventing pregnancy and no real mention of any complications. We were taught to view a woman's body primarily as a receptacle for a fetus. So I honestly learned a lot more about pregnancy and a woman's reproductive system from this book than I ever did in school. Her story is a frank depiction of her experience, not overwrought.
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Although I do not have children myself, it was hard not to connect with the author. She told an honest story with levity to make it both informative and entertaining. It is a serious subject, and it belongs in the growing canon of graphic nonfiction. I would recommend it to anyone--with or without children.
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Incredibly moving gut-punch of a book. I'm absolutely fascinated with individual pregnancy and birth stories, the more real the better. A recommended read for anyone else who craves this type of memoir.
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I'm not a graphic novel reader, so I can't speak to how this book compares to other books in that category. But I've enjoyed every one of Lucy Knisley's graphic memoirs, and Kid Gloves was by far my favorite so far. Perhaps because I found it the most personally relatable, and it was an incredibly open and personal story that Knisley told in this one as well. I loved her incorporation of science into the story as well!
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As a new mom, this book was very welcome.  Everyone has a different birth story. Everyone's labor is unique.  This book is raw, and real. I can see how it may scare some pregnant women, however, it also can be used to educate. I plan on buying it for our collection.
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What a wonderful graphic format book about the female fertility/maternity journey! I love her style and her honesty. The book chronicles this couple’s baby-making story, from the decision to “not try not to” have a baby, to struggling through the emotions surrounding miscarriages, then all the various struggles and anxieties of pregnancy. In between all of these parts of their story are medical segments documenting women’s health through history. This is a great book for anyone has had babies, wants to have babies, is wondering about having babies, or is just curious.  Much like pregnancy and parenthood, it’s not sugar-coated and not for the faint of heart, but it’s worth it!
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I could not stop reading this beautiful, inspiring and heartbreaking story once I started it!  Lucy Kinsley was able to put into words and illustrations emotions I have never been able to describe after having an emergency c-section.  I think every gynecologist, fertility doctor, midwife or preferred fertility and women's health expert should have this book readily available for women AND men to read.  Lucy provides readers with incredible insights, developed from facts and personal experience, to embrace the rollercoaster of emotions that come with fertility, pregnancy and childbirth.
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Love all of her books! I waited to read her Something New wedding book until after my wedding in case there was anything in it that would stress me out. I think I probably also should have waited to read this until after I have kids. Her story has me a bit freaked out for what’s to come in the future, but I still loved it! It was a fun mix of memoir and pregnancy facts, and I loved that she included photographs as well. 

Bonding moment: She signed a book for me at Book Con 2016 while very pregnant (month before she had “Pal”).
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Kid Gloves looks like another cutesy book about pregnancy, but it's a lot more than that. It also features myths and facts about pregnancy, some interesting history regarding how far obstetric medicine has come, tidbits about medical struggles, and most notably, a long section on infertility and miscarriages.

There's a point Lucy makes at one point that really resonated with me, as a fellow miscarriage survivor: If 1 in 4 pregnancies end in miscarriage, why aren't 25% of media portrayals of pregnancies acknowledging that? Instead, we live in a world where people are made to feel guilty, ashamed, and/or tragically alone after a miscarriage, and we have to do better. It isn't fair for anyone to suffer these traumas alone.

While it got a bit boring at times, overall, I thought Kid Gloves was an interesting pregnancy memoir. I'm not sure I would give it to an expectant mother, because I think it would have terrified me to read about Lucy's emergency c-section and pre-eclampsia in such vivid details, but it was still fascinating to read about and heart-warming to know that everything turned out okay for Lucy and her little family in the end.

Thank you so much to the publisher for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!
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What a unique way to show an undiscussed topic! I've never read a whole graphic novel before, but this was a nice shift in my normal.

I, too, realized the truth that fertility is a privilege and gift, rather than a guarantee. I could relate with the author's story and the hilarious takes on the little lessons along the way.

Well done! I'll look for more!
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I reviewed this on my blog and will provide details in the next stage when I can give my opinion directly to the publisher.
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Having read and enjoyed Lucy Knisley's previous work, I shouldn't be surprised by how much I loved this book but I have to say that she is just getting better with each book she writes!

Kid Gloves is all about Knisley's pregnancy journey but it also focuses on all of the facts and fictions that surround pregnancy. It's pretty mind-boggling that we are all here because someone carried us for 9 months and gave birth to us and yet so many of us are still completely in the dark about everything that goes into getting pregnant, being pregnant, and giving birth. I have yet to get pregnant but I hope to one day, and I have to admit I'm glad that I read this before heading down that road because it both taught me some great info and inspired me to seek out even more.

Not everyone will have a complicated pregnancy story like Lucy Knisley, but then again, how do I know since so many people are quiet about the complications and fears that come with being pregnant and giving birth? I thought this book was inspiring and eye-opening and funny and I cannot wait to see what Knisley has up her sleeves next because her books just keep getting better!
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This was an honest and moving account of the author’s experiences while trying to conceive and while pregnant. Punctuated with bits of pregnancy research (some reassuring and some quite frightening practises from years ago) Knisley shares her own story of grief, illness, loss and joy in the way she best knows how, through pictures and illustrations. I really enjoyed this account and smiled and cried along with her, though if I was pregant or trying to conceive it may have terrified me a little! 

Many thanks to the publishers for allowing me access to a preview copy of this book via NetGalley.
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Having lost children through miscarriage (early and late in the pregnancy), Lucy Knisley's story hits too close to home. While she writes about a very serious and heartbreaking time in her life, she is able to do so with a very clear lens and even some humor. What makes her books so appealing is that she brings in the world around us to make her story a part of the bigger picture. The facts about fertility, pregnancy, women's issues aren't just sidebars, They're there to make us aware that she's not the only one, it's not just about her, it's about all of us.
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Lucy Knisley is one of my favourite graphic novelists out there. I have read and re-read all of her other books, so when I was given an ARC from Netgalley of her soon-to-be released book, Kid Gloves, I was extremely excited.  This instalment of Knisley's autobiographical series follows Lucy as she embarks on a challenging journey into parenthood, rife with miscarriages, health problems and a near-death experience. It is a fascinating and heart-rending read.

A Perfect Blend of Narrative & Science

What I love about Knisley's books is that woven throughout her personal stories are facts and histories relating to the topic that she is covering. In Kid Gloves, she examines not only her own struggles as a young woman trying to conceive and carry a child to term, but she also delves into the complex history and science of reproduction. I think that this connection between autobiographical stories and the wider history acts to draw the reader in. Even though Knisley's narrative is personal, it begins to feel personal to the reader in this way too.

A Light Touch

There are moments in this narrative that will smash your heart, but there are also some hilarious episodes too. I liked reading the lighter anecdotes such as the one about crazy morning sickness (i.e. learning that Charlotte Bronte died from morning sickness! What?!?) This kept the tone of the narrative light, which balanced out the heartbreaking stories about her early miscarriages and the many other hardships that she faced. Reading Lucy Knisley's books feels like talking to a good friend that you haven't seen in a while and I think it is because  her writing is accessible. This is especially important if you consider that the message of her book--that health care for women isn't necessarily in line with their needs--is an important one.

Read this Book! Read it! Why? Because it will change the way you view pregnancy and childbirth along with a million other fascinating ideas. Read it because her story will make you cry. Read it to fall in love with her art (it is beautiful). Read it to feel like you've just discovered your book best friend, because seriously, if you haven't yet discovered Knisley, it's time. Okay, good talk. Now go pickup a copy of Kid Gloves on February 26, 2019.
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