Queen of the World

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 31 Dec 2018

Member Reviews

One of my fave bios of Elizabeth II, rich with detail I’d not read elsewhere. A fascinating look at England’s longest reigning monarch. 5 of 5 stars

Thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for the ARC. Opinions are mine. Pub Date 01 Jan 2019. #QueenOfTheWorld #NetGalley
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This book was way too long.  The author seems to have decided to try and add every positive item about the Queen.  No matter what the situation is she is never to blame.  The premise of the book was interesting that she is not just the Queen of England but Queen of the World through her commonwealth. I expected a balanced book.  The book could have used an editor.  The author bounces  from one time frame to another. I am sure there are other better more even handed books about the Queen.
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I have many biographies on Queen Elizabeth and this is the most detailed biography of her. This book shows how Elizabeth has made an impact on the world and history. While it is a long book, the biography is very comprehensive and easy to read. I recommend this for those who love the Windsors.
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What a knowledgeable book about the British monarchy and their role of being “Head of the Commonwealth.” I did enjoy how this went into detail about all of Queen Elizabeth’s countries and territories, both past and current, and just how much work goes into keeping their relationships running smoothly, even during times of trouble within the country. Definitely a read if you want to learn more about the history of the Commonwealth as well as some of the history of the Windsor monarchy.
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`Queen of the World is a look at the Queen as not just the head of England but the Head of the Commonwealth of 53 countries. The book explores her travels and the guests that she has entertained.  It was a very interesting look at some behind the scenes scoops and opinions of her guests, especially all the U.S. Presidents, how she handled difficult dictators and demanding visitors, and her relationships with all her prime ministers. The book peaked my interest so much I followed up this book with additional readings and videos. The writer also clarifies some of the falsehoods the readers may have seen on the Netflix series “The Crown”. I definitely would recommend this comprehensive review of the Queen and her relationship with her Commonwealth.
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i thank you for offering this wonderful book but it is not compatible with Kindle and the PDF does not work.
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At over 500 pages, this is a comprehensive biography of Queen Elizabeth II.  It refreshingly focuses on the geopolitical influence she has had over the years, rather than on tabloid-type gossip.  These are stories you've probably not heard in the news or in other publications, based on interviews with aides and political figures.  I found the stories quite interesting, and they gave me a new perspective on the intricacies of the commonwealth and a new respect for the Queen.
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While most works detailing Queen Elizabeth II focus on her role within the United Kingdom, she also serves as Head of the Commonwealth, a collective of fifty-three sovereign states ranging from Australia to Zambia. In this capacity, while having no direct authority over the states, she regularly flexes her diplomatic soft power. Traveling the world, hosting dinners, receiving guests, her appearance at opportune times alone is sometimes enough to spur negotiations or further an agenda. By visiting over 130 countries throughout her reign, Elizabeth II has become a true Queen of the World.

The best part of this book is Robert Hardman’s access to the Royal Archives as well as individuals close the Queen. This adds authority to the many stories and anecdotes he has amassed, and the sheer heft of the detail he provides feels all-encompassing. It obviously isn’t, considering a rule of over sixty years would be an impossible task. However, readers can walk away with a grasp on what it’s like to navigate as a global diplomat in an ever-changing world.

And what stories he tells.

How do you select gifts for world leaders when one wrong could completely tarnish international relations? The Royal Yacht Brittannia Yacht Britannia served beyond transportation— acting as a vessel for diplomatic meetings. Even the Queen’s fashion has its own tales, with her numerous embellishments depending on her mission receiving plenty of attention. All of this, and more, is described in detail by individuals who were present through it all, and it’s riveting reading about their service in the name of the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth, and the Queen herself.

If there is one fault in Hardman’s work, it’s the exceedingly rosy picture he paints of the royal family. He doesn’t necessarily avoid dust-ups and gaffes, but they are brushed aside easily. This was especially the case with the Duke of Edinburgh on his trip to China in 1986 where he made a racist remark to a group of students. Hardman, rather than offering even minor admonishment, instead focuses on the press’s handling of the story, lamenting that it’s a continually repeated whenever writing about the Duke. This is the most extreme example of needless defense, but it’s common. The royals appear to do no wrong, or it’s always someone else’s fault.

Still, the overall portrait of Queen Elizabeth II as a statesman is stunning, if a bit protected. As a piece of archival research alone, this book is an incredible feat—picking a page at random, most will be impressed by the care and attention paid to the subject. Fortunately, Hardman’s readable style keeps this work both endearing and accessible.

Note: This review will be posted to my blog, Plucked from the Stacks, on 12/20/2018.
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I went into reading “The Queen of the World” with little to no knowledge about Queen Elizabeth II. I have always been interested in the English monarchy but my interest has always lied with her much early ancestors. Upon reading “The Queen of the World”, however, I found myself fascinated by the current Queen. Queen Elizabeth has truly lived a remarkable and long life and I think the book does a good job of telling this tale. I also felt that the book provided a good contrast between the woman and the title itself. The Queen, for instance has seen more of the world then any other world leader yet dislikes air travel and enjoys being at home. 

 One of the particularly interesting aspects of Royal Life that the book touches on deals with the logistics of hosting state dinners and visiting other nations. There’s a whole set of formalities to consider before she can visit a nation or allow another nation’s leader to visit her. Once an invitation is extended from either side there is also a lot of planning involved, from who should be seated where to what sort of gifts should be given. 

I feel that this book provides a good overview of the Queen and glimpse into palace life and while the book is rather long most of the information is rather interesting and able to keep ones attention.
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This book was loaded with lots of names, royal protocol, rules and yet was fascinating! I assumed the Queen was able to do as she pleased, but she is held to a set of standards dictated to her from those running her schedule. I found that she is a very interesting lady with a personality that many never really see. I think my favorite chapter showcases some of the gifts that she has received from around the world and how the gift makes it's way to London.
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I'm new to reading about the life of this Queen - I have usually focused on the life of deceased ones! - so I cannot speak to any historical accuracy. However, I teach leadership and use women leaders as examples and this well constructed book provided me a lot of fodder with which to do that.
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