Theodore Roosevelt for the Defense

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 21 Jun 2019

Member Reviews

Insightful description of the libel trial of Teddy Roosevelt. Fascinating to see the larger than life ex-president who seemingly could sell ice to Eskimos. In the run up to the first world war Roosevelt is is sued for libel by the party boss of the New York state Republicans. Roosevelt, the boisterous and legendary American hero, had continued to support the progressive wing of the party after leaving the presidency. One of his endorsements accused a former friend and ally, William Barnes of political corruption. Barnes responded by suing for an enormous sum that could have bankrupted Roosevelt. Roosevelt defends himself on the stands and the nation follows along in the papers. Interesting insight in to the politics, media, and law of the time along with fascinating characters.
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This is a brilliant book about Teddy Roosevelt's little heard about liable trial where he defended himself in court.  Dan Abrams and David Fisher captured the essence of this trial.  This was an enjoyable read that I highly recommend!
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5 stars!

An intriguing look into a fascinating individual who made a huge impact in the history of the US.

I voluntarily read an advanced copy.
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I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  														
														
From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it.														
							
					

“This trial and Roosevelt’s defence of his reputation on the stand, often under fierce questioning, is truly mesmerizing.” —Brian Kilmeade 

The New York Times bestselling authors of Lincoln’s Last Trial take readers inside the courtroom to witness the epic 1915 case in which Theodore Roosevelt, weighing one last presidential run, defended his integrity and challenged the political system. 

“No more dramatic courtroom scene has ever been enacted,” reported the Syracuse Herald on May 22, 1915, as it covered “the greatest libel suit in history,” a battle fought between former President Theodore Roosevelt and the leader of the Republican party. 

Roosevelt, the boisterous and mostly beloved legendary American hero, had accused his former friend and ally, now turned rival, William Barnes of political corruption. The furious Barnes responded by suing Roosevelt for an enormous sum that could have financially devastated him. The spectacle of Roosevelt defending himself in a lawsuit captured the imagination of the nation, and more than fifty newspapers sent reporters to cover the trial. Accounts from inside and outside the courtroom combined with excerpts from the trial transcript give us Roosevelt in his own words and serve as the heart of Theodore Roosevelt for the Defense. 

This was Roosevelt’s final fight to defend his political legacy and perhaps regain his fading stature. He spent more than a week on the witness stand, revealing hidden secrets of the American political system, and then endured a merciless cross-examination. Witnesses including a young Franklin D. Roosevelt and a host of well-known political leaders were questioned by two of the most brilliant attorneys in the country. 

Following the case through court transcripts, news reports, and other primary sources, Dan Abrams and David Fisher present a high-definition picture of the American legal system in a nation standing on the precipice of the Great War, with its former president fighting for the ideals he held dear.

The only great thing about chicken pox at age 52 (and being a super- speed reader) is you can easily read and review four+++ books a day..and this was an excellent book to have spent an hour or two (or many more on your side) with.

I love Teddy Roosevelt and this case was one that we studied at university - the fact that Dan Abrams is a lawyer 9and Legal analyst for ABC news) makes it extra inciteful and interesting. The case is well presented and the writing style clear and concise. (Dang I wish that I had had this book when I was in that class). To see the great Teddy Roosevelt defending and fighting for his honour (all while the looming shadow of WWI is in the background) is an excellent read for any lover of non-fiction and courtroom fiction books.  (Teddy Roosevelt is on Mount Rushmore for a reason, people!)

As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use on Instagram and Twitter) so let's give it ⚖️⚖️⚖️⚖️⚖️
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