Cover Image: How to Treat People

How to Treat People

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Member Reviews

This was a great book. I loved all the different stories from her career and following the journey. It was great getting a perspective from the eyes of a student as well as stories from other areas of her career.

A great read for both people in the healthcare industry and those who aren't.
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This book is different to what I was expecting – it’s part memoir and part science. Molly Case talks about her own life, and her work life as a nurse but interspersed with those chapters are more scientific chapters about particular medical issues or the history of a condition. I have to be honest and say that while I appreciated this book it just wasn’t fully for me. I do still recommend it though because it is well written and interesting.
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Lately there is a lot of books based on life within the medical profession. This offers that plus something a bit extra, it offers an insight into like as a nurse but with so much more. 
This is a must read. I found this book fascinating to read. It certainly opened my eyes as to the work that our nurses do. 
A must read
Highly recommend this
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This book is much more focused on the medical side of nursing than other titles such as The Language of Kindness. It took me a bit of time to get into it but when I did I loved it. Molly Case uses ABCDE (Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Disability and Exposure) to structure the book. Each section has stories related to that theme eg around keeping airways open and also takes you into the patient's life. Not only is this a story of Molly's career, medicine, and what an incredible job nurses do for us but it is also the story of Molly's relationship with her father and his issues with his heart and his own heart surgery. Read it!
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So I must start by saying the author is a beautiful writer and the words flow wonderfully, you can imagine exactly what she’s describing and I think it’s a very direct approach to what she has to say. 
However I must say it feels lifeless, almost as if the author wasn’t the nurse, it I have to say I don’t think the title matches the contense in the slightest. Although I didn’t dislike the book, I didn’t like it either, too flat for me and I’m not sure why such reference to her father when I was imaging (as per the title) how patients were treated. 
However it is beautifuly written and may be best of read by those in the profession
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Some interesting insights in a nurse’s duties. Some interesting tidbits of medical history. Veers from semi-poetic descriptions to memoir to technical explanations to medical history and back again and thus left me a bit giddy and confused.
In some case histories, details are given right down to the name of a faulty gene and then the flow of the story stops abruptly for something unrelated to begin. This stop-and-go style together with a constant change of register was exhausting. My main bugbear, however, were the “creative-writing class” similes,  e.g. likening the heart to a “carnelian sun beating a holy sequence of notes”. And then a FIVE-page description of the removal of a penis piercing during the pre-OP of an elderly patient. Really?
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Another great addition to the medical memoir, and this time the poignancy of out of work life following a nursing career was very effective.
I definitely recognised all of the hospital characters Case shares with us from my recent (fortunately short) brushes with hospital life.

Should be essential reading for anyone in government responsible for the NHS - it is as important as Adam Kay's book
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3.5 rounded down

A solid addition to the medical memoir sub-genre, How to Treat People offers a slightly different perspective compared to the previous books I've read in this genre - that of a nurse. What I took away from this was that nurses have a slightly different relationship with patients than that of surgeons and doctors/GPs, and Case's book is written with true compassion for her patients in their time of need. Her experiences at work are interwoven with her father's and her own medical background, along with snippets of history of medicine and specific illnesses. Fans of This is Going to Hurt and Do No Harm are sure to find something to enjoy here.
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Read and reviewed in exchange for a free copy from NetGalley. I generally enjoy medical memoirs, and this one was no exception. Case gives an insightful look into nursing whilst also sharing her own family history and incorporating aspects of medical history and etymology, which I found really interesting.
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The modern day “Call the Midwife” of nursing, a sensitive read from both the professional side and the side of a caring daughter
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I love all of these books that are suddenly becoming popular- true life memoirs that give us an insight into our emergency services, into life and death and everything in between. I wonder is it because we are becoming ever more distant from one another that we seek out this empathy in book form and other media instead? This book is full of empathy, whilst showing the trials and tribulations of healthcare. I couldn’t put it down and finished in record time. The love, passion, care and empathy that sang out from the pages was so powerful.
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